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551.05 

UNN 
\ft97-l90O 



Nh/ 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. 



RETORT FOR AUGUST. 1897. 



NEBRASKA SECTION 



OF THE 



LIMATE AND CROP SERVICE 



OF THE 



WEATHER BUREAU. 



PUBLISHED BY AUTHORITY OF THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE. 



UNDER DIRECTION OP 

WILLIS L. MOORE 

CHIEF OP WEATHER BUREAU 



BY 



G. A. LOVEbAjMD, 

OBSERVEB AND SECTION DIRECTOR. 

Office, University of Nebraska, Lrincolp. 




PTatural History 
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August, 1897. 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, 

CLIMATE AND CROP SERVICE 



WEATHER BUREAU. 



Central Office, [ 
Washington, I). C. ) 



( wlLIilS Ii. MOORE, 
J Chief. 



NEBRASKA SECTION. 

G. A LOVELAND, Section Director, 

LINCOLN, NEBR. 



Vol. II. 



LINCOLN, NEBR. 



No. 8. 



THUNDERSTORMS.* 

(From Davis's Elementary Meteorology.) 

Observations at single stations serve to give the hours 
d seasons when thunderstorms are most frequent; audit 
» thus found that a decided excess of storms occurs during 
the warmer spells of the warm season and in the afternoon 
or early evening hours ; but this kind of observation does 
not suffice for the determination of their larger features. 
For this reason, the systematic study of thunderstorms by 
numerous volunteer observers, all working on a uniform 
plan, has been attempted in the various countries of Europe 
and in different parts of the United States, with the most 
interesting results. The arrival of the squall wind, the 
beginning and ending of the rain, and the time of heaviest 
thunder, serve to mark the arrival and passage of the storm 
with much accuracy. The accounts of local storms, when 
reported for newspapers, should give at least some of these 
data, as well as a statement of the damage done by wind, 
rain, or lightning. When the records from many stations 
are charted, and lines are drawn to indicate the place of the 
storm front at successive half hours or hours, a number of 
isolated storms of moderate size may be detected, all moving 
in a common direction ; or a single large thunderstorm may 
be found, advancing broadside or obliquely, with a belt of 
clouds 50 or a hundred or more miles in length and from 10 
to 30 miles in breadth, exclusive of the cirro-stratus cover 
which in large storms spi'eads out many miles in advance of 
the rain-cloud belt. The height of the cloud tops certainly 
reaches 5 miles in our stronger summer thunderstorms, the 
upper clouds being then of ice crystals in spite of the high 
temperature at the bottom of the atmosphere. 

"All the features of thunderstorms point to their depend- 
ence on a convectional overturning of the atmosphere. They 
occur in warm regions and in the warm season, when the 
vertical gradient is stronger than in cold regions or in win- 
ter. They are most common and most violent in spells of 
warm summer weather, and at or shortly after the hour of 
the day when convectional movements are most active. 
They receive great assistance from the latent heat liberated 
from their abundant condensation of vapor at relatively 
high temperatures. Their early stages may be traced hack 



* Begun in Report for July, 1897. 



to a beginning in ordinary cumulus clouds, in which the 
misty filaments are seen ascending and inflowing at the 
base, but rolling out and dissolving at the top on the side 
where the general motion of the air currents brushes them 
forward. Many such clouds may be watched during a sum- 
mer morning from their first appearance, through their later 
growth to a large size, and then to their fading away ; all 
these changes often requiring but a fraction of an hour, in 
which the cloud remains clearly in sight as it floats from 
west to east. The warmer the day, the larger the clouds and 
the longer their life. About noon, or soon after it, the 
attentive observer may sometimes notice that some of these 
towering cumulus clouds reach a greater size than the rest, 
their ragged lower edges still showing inflowing wisps, while 
the sharp-cut convex summits mount higher and higher, and 
at last manifest the initial stages of cirro-stratus overflow. 
The cloud then assumes the familiar anvil form, so com- 
monly associated with distant thunderstorms. 

" Even after the first cirrus overflow takes place, the cloud 
may fail to produce much rain, unless the process of growth 
is actively continued ; but if the air be especially hot and 
sultry, a full development is likely to follow such a begin- 
ning. If an overflowing cloud of this kind comes in sight 
over the western horizon shortly after noon, floating east- 
ward in the upper winds, its further increase to mature size 
and strength may generally be seen as it passes the observer. 
The inflow at the forward lower edge is easily recognized by 
the movement of the cloud wisps ; the ascent of the currents 
within the great cloud mass is clearly demonstrated by the 
upward expansion of the lofty thunder-heads ; the outflow 
at the summit is manifested in the cirro-stratus sheet, pre- 
sumably beginning at an altitude where the ascending air is 
cooled to the temperature of the air around it. Sometimes 
one part of the cloud may reach a somewhat greater height 
than the rest, as if supplied by a rather warmer or moister 
indraft at the base. When the summit outflow is well estab- 
lished, it flows forward in the faster-moving upper currents ; 
sometimes toppling over tumultuously, and dissolving away 
as it settles to lower levels; sometimes spreading evenly 
eastward in a broad sheet, more or less distinctly festooned 
on its under surface. 

(To be continued.) 



CROP CONDITIONS. 



All crops suffered somewhat from the extreme heat and 
south wind that prevailed during the last week in July, and 
the month of August opened with rather unfavorable crop 
conditions. The first half of August was cool, with general 
showers. The last half of the month was very dry in most 
counties, with the temperature below normal, except during 
the last week, when it was about normal. These conditions 
explain crop development during the month, and naturally 
divide it into two parts. 

The first half: Thrashing and haymaking were retarded 
by wet weather, and all growing crops were improved in con- 
dition. A small amount of wheat was injured in shock by 
growing, but generallv the amount of grain damaged in Jive- 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



August, 1897. 



shock was less than usual. Corn recovered rapidly from the 
effects of the hot weather in July, but did not grow rapidly 
because of the low temperature. Corn was from one to two 
weeks behind the usual development on the 15th, but, with 
this exception, was in exceptionally good condition. Plow- 
ing for winter wheat was started, with prospect of a large 
acreage to be sown. 

The last half: Thrashing and haymaking were pushed 
rapidly forward, the results being a good crop of wheat, 
oats, and hay. Corn suffered somewhat from dry weather, 
but continued to make fair progress until the last week, 
when the high temperature and continued dry weather 
began to show in the rapid advancement toward maturity 
of the entire crop. Early planted corn ripened up without 
injury. The premature ripening of the late planted will 
shorten the yield in most all counties. Fall plowing prac- 
tically ceased, and at the close of the month very little fall 
grain had been sown. 



COMPARISON OF PAST AUGUSTS. 

The monthly maximum and minimum temperatures for 
several stations have been obtained for the years 1876 to 
1888, and the following table has been revised. The addi- 
tional data included makes this a much more reliable table 
of extremes of temperature for the State than has been 
previously published, and also accounts for the difference 
between this and former tables : 



^Temperature.^ 
Mean. Max. Min. Prec. 



/—Temperature.^ 
Mean. Max. Min. Prec. 



1876 73-5 97 

1877 72.8 102 

1878 74-4 i°3 

1879 72.9 100 

1880 73.2 102 

1881 78.8 102 

1882 73.4 106 

1883 71.3 102 

1884 70.3 97 

1885 69.8 96 

1886 75.4 108 



51 
46 
34 
52 
42 
40 
42 



3-25 
2.04 
2.16 
1-54 
3-87 
1. 18 
l-3» 
3-21 
2.97 
3-96 

3-22 



1887 70.9 

1888 70.2 

I889 72.9 

1890 7I.7 

189I 70.6 

I892 73.2 

1893...' 7»-3 

1894 75-8 

1895 73-° 

1896 73-3 

1897 70.8 



104 
103 
i°5 
108 
106 
113 
no 
108 
106 
107 
107 



3° 
34 
40 
34 
30 
3° 
35 
36 
39 
34 
37 



4.13 
3-'i 
2.40 
2.24 
2.92 
3.20 

2 -33 
0.74 
3-°4 
1. 81 
2.60 



CLIMATOLOGY OF THE MONTH. 

General characteristics: The temperature and precipitation 
for August were slightly below the normal. The maximum 
temperatures ranged from 90° to 107°, but at about three- 
fourths of the stations they ranged from 96° to 100°. The 
rainfall was very near the normal, and the greater portion 
fell during the rainy period extending from the 1st to the 
9th. There was but one comparatively general rain during 
the latter half of the month, and that fell on the 29th. 
Thunderstorms occurred somewhere in the State on almost 
every day during the first half of the month, and also from 
the 27th to the 30th. Light hail was reported at a few 
stations on the 16th. No auroras were observed. 

Atmospheric pressure: The mean pressure was 29.99 inches, 
which is 0.03 of an inch above the normal for August. The 
highest during the month was 30.28 inches, at Omaha on 
the 5th, and the lowest, 29.68 inches, at North Platte on 
the 31st. 

Temperature: The mean temperature for the State was 
70.8°, which is 1.7° below the normal. The highest temper- 



ature reported from the State was 107°, at Imperial on the 
1st, and the lowest, 37°, at Nebraska City on the 20th. 

Wind: The prevailing direction of the wind was from the 
southeast; the average velocity was 7.6 miles an hour; the 
highest velocity was 48 miles an hour, at Lincoln on the 
17th, from the northwest. 

Precipitation: The average precipitation for the State was 
2.60 inches, which is 0.02 of an inch below the normal for 
August. The largest rainfall reported at any one station 
was 7.75 inches, at Loup, and the leant, trace, at Fort Rob- 
inson. The total deficiency for the li.-st eight months of 
1897 for the State as a whole was 1.59 inch «a. 

Wind and Humidity Table. 



Stations. 



Lincoln 

North Platte 
Omaha 



Wind. 



Miles. Mean. Max. Dir. Date 



6,406 
5.457 
5.039 



8.7 
7-3 
6.8 



nw. 
nw. 
nw. 



Huii.ldity. 



Mean. 



73-0 
68.5 
68.9 



Low- 
est. 



Dat 



Means for the Six Equal Sections of the State. 





Temperature. 


Precipitation. 


Number of days- 


Sections. 


Mean. 


Depart- 
ure.* 


Mean. 


Depart- 
ure.! 


Rainy. 


Clear. 


Partly 
cloudy. 


Cloudy 


Southeastern . . . 
Northeastern... 


72-4 
69.4 
7i-7 
72.6 
69. 1 
69.4 
70.8 


—1.5 
-2.8 
— 1. 1 
-1.4 
—2.4 

— 1.2 

— i-7 


3-°3 
2.25 
2.90 
3.08 
2.38 
i-97 
2.60 


— 0.40 
—0.88 
+0-45 
+0.26 
+0.17 
+0.3' 
— 0.02 


6.1 
6.6 
6.8 
6.0 
6.8 
5-2 
6.2 


17.6 
16.2 
19. i 
15-8 
15-6 
17.7 

17.0 


8.6 
10. 1 

7-5 
10.4 
n. 4 

7.8 

9-3 


4.8 
4.6 
4-4 
4.8 
4.0 
5-5 
4-7 


Southwestern . . 

Northwestern . . 
State 



* From 1 o-year normal. + From 20-year normal. 

Supplemental Precipitation Table. 



Stations. 



Arcadia 

Benedict 

liurchard 

Cornlea 

Culbertson . . 

Dawson 

Divide 

Eden 

Elba 

Ewing 

Fairmont 

Filley 

Haigler 

Hayes Center 

Hickman 

Lyons 

McC'oolJunct 
Marquette ... 

M onroe 

Nemaha 

Norman 

Ord 

Osceola 

Ough 

Palmer 

St.Libory 

Salem 

Sargent 

Schuyler 

Sioux City, Iowa 

Stockham 

Strang 

Stratton 

Stromsburg 

Sutton 

Syracuse 

Valparaiso 

Wallace 

Wilber 

Willard; 

Wilsonville 

Wisner 

Woodlawn 

Yankton, S. Dak 



Counties. 



Valley 

York 

Pawnee — 

Platte 

Hitchcock . 
Richardson 
Sherman . .. 
Nemaha . .. 
Howard — 

Holt 

Fillmore... 

Gage 

Dundy 

Hayes 

Lancaster . 

Burt 

York 

Hamilton . . 

Platte 

Nemaha ... 
Kearney . . . 

Valley 

Polk 

Dundy 

Merrick — 
Howard . . . 
Richardson 

Custer 

Colfax . . .. 



Hamilton 
Fillmore . 
Hitchcock 

Polk 

Clay 

Otoe 

Saunders.. 
Lincoln . . . 

Saline 

Lincoln . . . 
Furnas — 
Cuming ... 
Lancaster 



Length 
of rec- 
orders 



Total. 



2. 11 

2. 11 
4.42 
3-46 
2.95 
5-9° 
2-74 
6. 11 
2.38 
1.90 



4-15 
2.32 

3-'3 
2-5' 
1. 61 
1.72 
2.58 
2.76 
4-55 
3-33 
2.29 

5.78 
3-49 
3-°4 
4.10 

3-°3 
4.20 
2.51 
2.00 
4.60 
2.97 
2.90 
2.85 
..65 
1.60 



3-77 
1-39 
4-63 



Depart- 
ure from 
normal. 



+0.43 
— 0.24 



+ 1.80 



+4-09 
+ i.'5 



+ 0.08 
— i.26 



+ 0. 10 
— 1. 13 



No. 
rainy 
days. 



Observers. 



W.B.Reynolds. 

R. B. Brabham. 

J. A.Kinsey. 

E.J. Couch. 

Mrs.L. A. Wibley. 

M.L.Llbbec. 

M.H.Smith. 

D.J.Wood. 

Mark Holm. 

G.H.Benson. 

G.H.Borden. 

Elijah Filley. 

T.P.F.Haine. 

R.C.Orr. 

N.J.Kuhlman. 

N.R.Kellam. 

F.S.Morris. 

John Ellis. 

Wm. Webster. 

R.J. Duff. 

J.F.Barnes. 

.las. Mi If ord. 

G.W.Murbarger. 

Wm.Ough. 

W.S.Green. 

W.I.Meader. 

W.W.McDermet. 

J.S.Spooner. 

L.N.Dickman. 

Weather Bureau. 

J.W.Gray. 

S.Diller. 

C.W.Shurtliff. 

G.G.Green. 

l)T.f M.Birkner. 

L.Howell. 

W. J.Craven. 

A.E.Yocum. 

S.E.Davis. 

Wesley W.Lewis. 

D.M.Knapp. 

Chas. Richardson. 

N.B.Kendall. 

Weather Bureau. 



August, 1897. 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



Climatological data for Nebraska, August, 1897. 



Stations. 



Northeastern Sec. 

Agee * 

Columbus 

Creighton 

Fremont 

Hartington 

Lynch* 

Madison* 

Norfolk 

Oakdale 

Omaha 

O'Neill 

Santee Agency 

Springfield* 

Stanton * 

'■kamah 

kefield 

f "oint 

eastern Sec. 

SUe* 

id 

rn* 

jra* 

.trice 

.ester* 

ete 

Javid City* 

Edgar* 

Fairbury 

Geneva 

Harvard* 

Hebron 

Lincoln 

Nebraska City 

Odell* 

Kulo* 

Seward * 

Superior* 

Tecumseh a 

Turlington 

Weepingwater* 

York* 

Central Sec. 

Albion 

Ansley 

Ashton* 

Urokenbow* 

liurwell* 

Callaway 

Central City* 

Dunning* 

Kricson * 

Genoa 

Gothenburg 

Grand Island 

Greeley * 

Kearney* 

Lexington 

Loup* 

North Loup 

Kavenna 

St. Paul * 

Southwestern Sec 

Arapahoe * 

Heaver City 

Henkleman* 

lilue Hill* 

Curtis 

Franklin 

Harrison Precinct*... 

Hastings* 

Holdrege* 

Imperial 

McCook* 

Madrid* 

Minden 

Red Cloud* 

Republican* 

Western Sec 

Camp Clark 

Gering 

Kimball 

Lodgepole 

Nesbit 

North Platte 

Seneca* 

Thedford* 

Whitman* 

Northwestern Sec 

Alliance *b 

liassett 

F'ort Robinson 

Hay Springs 

Kennedy 

Kirk wood* 

Springview 

Valentine 



Counties. 



Holt 

Platte 

Knox 

Dodge — 
Cedar — 

Boyd 

Madison . 

...do 

Antelope. 
Douglas.. 

Holt 

Knox 

Sarpy — 
Stanton . . 

Burt 

Dixon — 
Cuming . . 



York 

Saunders 

Nemaha 

Hamilton — 

Cage 

Thayer 

Saline 

Butler 

Clay 

Jefferson 

Fillmore 

Clay 

Thayer 

Lancaster — 

Otoe 

Cage 

Richardson .. 

Seward 

Nuckolls 

Johnson 

Otoe 

Cass 

York 



Boone 

Custer . . . 
Sherman . 
Custer . . . 
Garfield . . 
Custer . . . 
Merrick .. 
Blaine — 
Wheeler. , 
Platte.... 
Dawson .. 

Hall 

Greeley .. 
Buffalo... 
Dawson . . 
Sherman . 
Valley ... 
Buffalo... 
Howard.. 



Furnas 

...do 

Dundy 

Webster — 
Frontier — 
Franklin 

Frontier 

Adams 

Phelps 

Chase 

Red Willow. 

Perkins 

Kearney 

Webster 

Harlan 



Cheyenne ... 
Scotts Bluff. 

Kimball 

Cheyenne . . . 

Logan 

Lincoln 

Thomas 

...do 

Grant 



Box Butte . 

Rock 

Dawes 

Sheridan . . . 

Cherry 

Rock 

Key a Paha. 
Cherry 



1,442 
i, 600 

1.309 



1,585 
1.532 
1,722 
1, 103 

1,975 



1,472 
1,060 



1,100 
1,051 
1,792 
1,235 
1,618 
1,368 
1,619 
1,722 
1,316 
1,633 
1,812 

',458 
1,199 

941 
1,278 

842 
1,435 
1,574 
I,H3 
1,214 
1,080 
1,642 

1.747 
2,307 
2,061 

2,477 
2,180 

2,555 
1,708 
2,621 
2,029 
1,584 
2,557 
1,860 



2, 146 
2,385 
2,067 
1,961 
2,028 
1,796 

2,173 
2,147 
2,968 
1,967 
2,553 
1,820 



1,932 
2,324 
3,278 
2,506 
3,294 
2, 169 
1,687 
1,939 



4,697 
3,820 



2,841 
2,971 
2,842 
3,588 

3,968 
2,323 
3,764 
3,821 



2,613 



Temperature, in degrees Fahrenheit. 



Oh 



70.2 
69.6 
69.8 
69.7 
67.8 
69.4 
67.. s 
70.6 
67.6 
71.8 
67.2 
71-4 
71.2 
68.7 
69.8 
68.0 
69-3 

72.3 
72.4 
74-5 
77-4 
71.6 
73-5 
71-3 
67.4 
73-8 
73- o 
71-4 
71.8 
72.0 
71.7 
71.8 
74.0 
74.6 
71.6 
74-7 
71.6 
69.4 
68.0 
74-3 

68.7 
67.9 
72.1 
71.6 
71.7 
68.9 
76.6 
75-2 
73-1 
70.6 
71-7 
71.2 

74-3 
76.1 
70.4 
69-3 
69.4 
70.6 
73-2 

73-6 
73-9 
72.2 
73-4 
72.2 
73.4 
72.2 
71.0 
72.6 
73-5 
73-7 
72.3 
71-4 
71.6 
72.6 

70.1 
70.2 
69.7 
68.5 
70.4 
70.2 
68.0 
69.7 
65.2 

71.0 
67.6 
68.8 
67.7 
69.2 

7o.5 
71.0 
69-3 



s 2 



0.0 

-2.8 



-1-3 
-3-6 
-1.9 



— 1.8 



-2.3 
-2.0 



-1.0 

"2-7 



—2.3 



-1-5 

-2.1 



+0.7 



1-5 



-1-3 
-0.6 



"3-5 
-1.4 
-0.8 
-2.5 



+0.2 



50 

46 

42 

41 
42 
46 
38 

45 

41 
51 
41 

45 
49 

38 
42 
42 
39 

46 

45 
45 
58 
46 
54 
48 
54 
53 
46 
44 
54 
45 
48 
37 
58 
58 
53 
58 
45 
47 
42 
44 

44 
41 
45 
40 
52 
42 
65 
55 
56 
45 
47 
46 
57 
56 
43 
44 
43 
41 
SO 

52 
47 
56 
58 
4u 
41 
54 
53 
5° 
48 
58 
45 
43 
54 
54 

42 
41 
45 
42 
45 
47 
44 

15 
42 1 23 



■^ c 



Precipitation, in inches. 





5 


42 


7 


38 




45 


8 




5 


43 


14 






45 


7 


38 


1.3 




8 




13 


44 


6 




8 


44 


11 


39 


18 


42 


21 








6 




13 


45 


■9 


34 






19 




6 


46 




47 


7 








5 


47 






9 




6 


35 


20 


42 




41 


4 




9 


4b 


7 


45 


8 


44 


19 


47 


5 






43 




54 


6 




7 




6 


44 


7 






45 


IQ 




6 


56 




49 


8 


44 


9 


47 




45 




43 


23 








5 



0.43 

3-H 
1.69 
2.27 
1.60 
1.31 
3-26 
2.67 
3-38 
1.92 
2.26 
1.28 
2.16 
1.97 
3-06 
1-59 
1.86 

1.60 
1.44 
3.74 
2.94 
5-12 
2.50 
3-50 
3-30 
4.17 
3-37 
3-°4 
2.56 
2.63 
2.69 
2.36 
2.83 
5-23 
2.05 
1-39 
4.84 
2.60 

2-95 
1.68 

2.30 

4-55 
2-35 
1.36 
1. 41 
1. 7 S 
2.07 
1. 91 
2.61 
2.93 
3- 10 
2.40 
2.60 
1.60 
1-57 
7-75 
2-54 
6.54 
3-23 

1-35 
1-50 
3-78 
2.52 
3.26 
3-53 
0.82 
2.91 
o.95 
6.03 
1. 81 
2. 19 
2.27 
0.99 
6.41 

3- 88 
1.96 
1.66 
3.61 
1.99 
3-05 
1.80 
2,90 
o.57 

2- 15 

I.24 

T. 
3-ro 
3.61 
1. 41 
2.14 
2.09 



s 



-1.25 



— o. 27 

—1.19 

—1.51 



—1.30 
+1-03 
—1.42 

+0. 10 
—0.61 



—0.59 

— 0. 19 



— 1.73 
— 2.96 



+1.46 



+0.27 
+0.54 



+0.18 
—0.38 
—0.36 
—0.80 

—0.39 
—0.98 



— 0.91 

—1.80 
+0.80 



—0.69 
— 0.40 



+2.75 



—0.87 
+0.14 



+0.69 
+0.14 



-0.23 



—0.86 
—0.75 



+0.24 

+3-88 



+0.27 



— 0.42 
— 1-57 
+3-56 



-1.36 
-1.58 



+0.64 
+0.17 



+0.63 



-2.52 



—0.66 
— 1-59 
+ 1.31 
+ 2.24 



+ 0.08 
+0.01 



0.26 
0.78 
0.72 
1.08 
0.33 
0.55 
0.96 
1. 10 
1-33 
0.58 
1.68 
0.36 
0.78 

I-I5 

1.20 

0.53 
1. 18 

0.39 
0.50 

1-33 
1.29 

3-30 
0.90 

1-33 
1 .00 

3-25 
2.56 
2-37 
1.07 
2. 12 
■■32 
1.05 
1-54 
2.05 
0.92 
1.02 
2.20 
0.87 
0.97 
1.20 

0.74 
1-37 
0.76 
0.90 
o.34 
0.80 
0.68 
0.72 
1.36 
1.02 
2.25 

0-55 
1.40 

0-75 
o-75 
4.05 
I- 15 
2.25 
0-73 

0.70 

o.79 
2.64 
2.00 
2.34 
1. 21 
o.47 
1.76 
0-55 
■•39 
0.38 
0.56 
0.81 
0.32 
2.40 

I-5I 
1. 00 
0.78 
1.85 
o. so 
1.86 
0.85 
0.80 
0.50 

1.20 

0-35 
T. 

0.95 
1.66 

0.93 
1.20 
1.38 



6" 



Sky. 



2 5 



II 






st 

~ o 



nw. 

se. 

s. 



uw. 
se. 



nw. 
ne. 
nw. 



ne. 

ne. 

ne. 

ne. 

se. 

se. 

s. 

ne. 

s. 

se. 

sw. 

se. 

ne. 



ne. 
ne. 



nw. 
nw. 
sw. 
sw. 
ne. 



se. 

nw. 

se. 



nw. 

s. 

ne. 

sw. 

se. 

ne. 

se. 



n. 

se. 



se. 
ne. 



ne. 
se. 



se. 
se. 



se. 
se. 



se. 

sw. 

e. 

nw. 

w. 

nw. 

nw. 

ne. 

se. 

nw. 

sw. 

se. 

se. 

ne. 

nw. 



Observers. 



R.E.Bowden. 

C.C.Gray. 

Dr. Geo. Roberts. 

Wm. J. Phillips. 

T. B.A.Watson. 

C.C.Irwin. 

F.A.Long. 

W.H.Barber. 

G.S.C'lingman. 

U. S. Weather Bureau. 

O.M.Collins. 

W.H.Hamlin. 

J.G.Timberlake. 

W.Gerecke. 

Dr. A. D. Nesbit. 

I. II. W r eaver. 

C.J.Kadish. 

E.D.Smith. 

Dr. A. S. v Mansfelde. 

G.D.Carrington. 

H.C.Miller. 

C.Kellam. 

Stephen Forsdick. 

Doane College. 

E.B.Taylor. 

J.W.Hoberg. 

Herman (onerus. 

F.M.Flory. 

Dr. J. T.Fleming. 

Dr.C.M.Easton. 

U. S. Weather Bureau. 

E, Morton. 
W.F.Denton. 
W.F.Gingrich. 
L.E.Ost. 

J. II. Harrington. 
CM.] Miller. 
Wm.N. Hunter. 
G. Treat. 
W.H.Davis. 

F. A.Pettinger. 
Chas.R.Hare. 
F. Rein. 
W.L. Henry. 

F. L. Rector. 

Geo.B.Mair. 

J. A.McRae. 

E.E.Bolejack. 

A.Dahl. 

Geo. S.Truman. 

A.V.Carlson. 

E.Corbin. 

J. A.Pinkerton. 

C.E.Magner. 

IraP.Griswold. 

A.F.Werts. 

E.W. Black. 

Erastus Smith. 

Paul Anderson. 

J F.Edwards. 
C.G.George. 
W.E. Winger. 
C.S. Draper. 
Dr. S.R. Razee. 
F.T.Owen. 
Clara A. Dobson. 
<T. C.S warts. 

C. Engstroin. 
Robert Malcolm. 
C.T.Watson. 
John McKenzie. 
Joel Hull. 

('. E. Winger. 
W.Burdon. 

Robt. H.Willis. 

J.P.Finlev. 

F. I. Bellows. 

A.B.Persinger. 

G.E.Bolkrom. 

U. S. Weather Bureau 

D.McNall. 

O.G.Norton. 

J.L.Crossley. 

J. T. Whitehead. 
A. II. Gale. 
Post surgeon. 
C.A. Waterman. 

D. A.Piercy. 
Mrs.C.A.Arter. 
Miss Kzada Phelps. 
L'.T. Watson. 



* Temperature data from thermometers not self 



a, b, c, etc., indicate number of days missing from observed readings. 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



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CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



August, 1897. 















Daily precipitation for Nebraska, 


August, 1897. 




























Day of month. 




Stations. 


i. 


2. 


3- 


4- 


5- 


6. 


7- 


8. 


9- 


10. 


11. 


12. 


'3- 


14. 


'5- 


16. 


'-• 


18. 


'9- 


20. 


21. 


22. 


23- 


24. 


25- 


26. 


27- 


28. 


29. 


3°- 


3'- 


$ 






.26 








■°3 
•'5 
•03 


t 

•05 
.70 














• 14 








t 






+ 
























0-43 
2.30 

2.'5 
4-55 
'•35 
1.60 




.02 


t 




t 
1. 12 


.08 
.22 
•95 


•74 


t 




.60 


+ 






















•43 




t 








































•56 


.10 


.10 

• 70 

"t" 

.20 

.06 


•09 








.18 














.08 


















'•37 










































•35 








•38 
t 

.12 
1.29 
.02 


•39 
•'3 
•'5 
•52 
• °5 
3-3° 
•79 


.04 
1. 14 


.14 


.04 
•°7 

•32 


.26 
•50 
.60 
• °5 








.08 
•25 

'•33 
•'5 
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1.60 








.07 

• '5 

• °7 








































.02 




























.26 
.08 


.02 




1-44 
3-74 
2.94 
1.24 
5-'2 


























•°5 


















•32 








.06 




















• 4' 

t 




• 35 


•35 










































•03 
• 76 




.22 
































t 






t 
.08 

■°5 
.20 

.04 

"t 

.01 


•03 




■52 


.08 

+ 


■°3 
2.64 




t 


t 


t 






















. 10 










.22 

t 






















1.78 


Blue Hill 






•3° 
•°5 
.07 

•'5 
1. 19 
.82 


2.00 
t 

.18 
• 15 
■'9 
.90 

•59 
.61 
•°9 
.20 
•32 
3-25 












t 
t 


t 
























.22 

.90 








.25 


■3° 




. 11 










































•32 






































•35 


t 




•25 

'•5' 


t 
.16 

t 
.69 

• 07 

• 25 

• 5° 
.20 
.29 














t 






t 
















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.06 






.26 
■78 






•47 








t 


































.18 

• 27 

• 24 


.02 

2.34 
•°5 


• 78 

•92 
'•25 
•'3 


•°5 






.65 

.02 

■65 
.04 








t 

.07 














+ 














.72 

.04 


.02 


.07 

t 






•5° 
'•33 


"t" 




•'3 
. 11 
+ 
.80 


.02 


























.04 










.02 








•°9 








.08 




























■ °7 

1. 00 

■ 14 


.20 
1.36 






.eg 
•25 
. 12 
.72 

.68 
•45 
































David City 




























t 










.80 








•32 


































•72 


























t 


































.22 


.07 








.10 








































•25 








2.56 














.22 




.29 


























t 


. 11 


3- 
2.4 

t 




t 
t 




'•'5 


t 




.02 


.IO 






.88 






























t 










































































t 






















■9 
.16 




.14 

2-37 
.26 
.20 
+ 

.40 
.65 
.03 
•92 
.66 
t 
.40 

2. 12 








• °3 

t 


.10 






1.08 
.27 
.76 








•'5 






•03 
















•55 
.07 






2.27 
3-°4 
2.93 
1.96 
3-'° 
2.40 




.06 
.01 










.02 




.07 
















.04 
1.02 




■°3 
■'5 
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.01 


•59 
2.25 








•27 


























1. 00 
.06 


•50 

t 


+ 
.21 


. 11 
t 
.26 


• '5 
+ 
•44 








































•31 








t 
.48 


t 

• 40 
.24 




t 
.18 


•33 




























































•55 
1.40 

t 

•23 
•30 

t 












































'•57 


1.07 
■19 
•45 
.80 


•05 
"t" 


• 03 


.20 


• 33 

• °3 
















■32 






.16 




















.02 








.08 

t 






















2.56 
2.91 
2.32 
3.10 
2.63 
3-13 
0-95 
1.60 
3.61 
1.66 
'•57 
2.69 
3.61 
7-75 
'•3' 
2.51 
3.26 
2. 19 
1. 81 
1.72 
2.27 
2.36 
2.76 

'•99 

2.67 

2-54 
3-°5 
3-38 
2.83 
1.92 




• 19 




•36 














+ 




























'•34 
.60 

t 


t 










• •7 










t 










t 




■95 




.10 






















t 


•25 










•34 
1. 10 






. 10 


• 07 

•73 




















t 
.20 

t 
•75 
















1. 10 
















































t 


•3° 
■5° 




.10 




+ 


































■35 
























.70 
.12 
.04 
t 
.26 

■25 


• 25 

.78 


1.66 
• 13 




•35 

.12 


t 

•'9 
.20 

.02 

.02 

t 


■75 

.21 
.90 
. 12 

t 
t 


•25 
■5' 
.... 

.60 
2.05 
•05 

t 

.21 
■27 
•47 
.02 








■14 


























•05 


.21 


Kimball .. 












































•32 
.eg 

t 








.08 
.67 






























•'9 










U85 


t 
.07 


t 

• 13 

■ 4' 


.26 
.40 
.10 
.11 
.10 

. II 

.05 
.38 
.40 

.76 
.50 

.'26 

t 

.21 

.04 
.28 

'•54 
■ 04 
•°9 
.22 
.62 






t 
+ 








I.32 


.02 

t 














t 






•'3 


•5° 


t 

.08 




























Lynch 


.28 
.16 
.62 
.96 

't 
.10 
1.05 






























1. 10 
















.09 

•3° 
t 

•25 
•35 
•°5 
.81 
.18 






+ 
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t 


•5° 


•59 

.26 

.22 

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.02 
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t 
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.25 


• 25 
•25 






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t 

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•55 
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t 








t 
















•5° 
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.16 








t 




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t 






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■37 

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.20 
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■34 
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'■54 
• 24 

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.01 

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■'9 
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1.86 


















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1.04 
1-33 


• 03 






.02 








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Norfolk 


1. 10 






+ 


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.02 














t 


t 






•'3 








.56 
.02 
1. 11 
1.06 
.58 
•35 
.61 




















'•'5 


North Platte 


.01 






.01 




.01 


.04 


t 


















.01 












t 

•°5 

t 








t 








•°5 


Udell 














• '5 




























t 

1.68 


"+' 


t 




t 


.16 








■ '4 






.48 
















•52 
.60 






O'Neill 
















.04 








■59 


t 


•'5 
2.05 

. II 
I.85 




















t 








t 






2.29 
5-78 
3-49 
6-54 
0.90 
6.41 
5-23 
3-23 
4. 10 
1 28 








•43 






1.62 
•54 










.86 






















•29 
t 
.06 

.06 

'■75 
.02 

. 12 


'•45 
•73 


•78 
2-25 

•3" 
1.40 

.61 






•14 
.12 






.28 






•°5 
















"•30 
•58 
•'5 
•70 
.20 
.62 








t 




.04 
.16 

'■73 
.66 

t 


•5° 

•30 
•°5 


■'9 

■32 
2.40 
2.0s 

.18 

• '7 
.10 

'.'48 
■'9 
•24 

3-27 












.06 


























































•74 
. 12 
■'5 


.18 
















































I.40 
.72 














.18 




















t 
















■'9 






























1.70 












t 








t 












■27 
•°3 


■ 14 
2.13 








.36 
.02 

t 
•92 






.24 






.08 

t 




t 

f 














t 
t 




.50 


.02 
• 04 


•03 

•S5 
.10 
















+ 








.20 


•63 




3- 03 
4.20 




■59 
..„ 




1.60 
'.'36 




.80 












.16 








*'t* 


■ 05 


•85 


































•23 
























.28 








2.05 
2.14 

'•97 

4.60 




■39 


1.20 
■27 


































•05 




t 




■23 






'•'5 
'•33 














•"3 






































































































































•75 


.ro 
• '5 


2.20 

'.'68 

t 


•°5 
.06 


"t" 

•45 


•52 

.46 
.01 

.08 


•°S 






[.50 

• 45 
87 








■°5 
■5" 
.20 


.20 














.04 














4.84 
3-06 








.10 
■°3 
1.38 










1.20 
















• '3 

.16 








t 
.01 


•35 




















■ 05 


















.06 
■35 




























2.09 

'•59 


Wakefield 
















•53 






•05 










































































.01 




•50 


.01 


.21 


• 24 

t 


t 
.11 


.01 


■47 








•97 
1.18 








• 40 

• '4 












t 




.02 








•34 
.06 






2.95 
1.86 




















t 


.07 












•03 
t 


•50 




.02 
















.OI 




0-57 

3.77 


Wilber 






1. 18 
• °5 




.70 
1. 12 


.07 
.20 
I. 20 








'■52 


. 10 


•3° 






















t 












.21 


2.95 
.08 




































4.63 














■ 40 




































1.68 





























































t Traee, when precipitation is less than o.oi inch 



v.i? 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. 



REPORT FOR MARCH. 1898. 



NEBRASKA SECTION 



OF THE 



CLIMATE AND CROP SERVICE 



OF THE 



WEATHER BUREAU 



PUBLISHED BY AUTHORITY OF THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE. 



UNDER DIRECTION OF 

WILLIS L. MOORE 

CHIEF OF WEATHER BUREAU 



15Y 



G. A. LiOVEbAN'D, 

OBSERVER AND SECTION DIRECTOR. 

Office, University of Nebraska, bincolp. 




00 
C6 

oo 



X 

02 
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Q 
55 






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March, 1898. 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, 

Climate and Crop Service 

OF THE 

WEATHER BUREAU. 



Central Office, ) 
Washington, 1>. C. } 



j WIULIS Jj. MOORE, 
1 Chief. 



NEBRASKA SECTION, 
G. A. LOVELAND, Section Director, 

LINCOLN, NEBR. 



Vol. III. 



LINCOLN, NEBR. 



No. 3. 



THE EXUDATION OF WATER FROM LEAVES. 

By C. E. Bessev, 

Professor of Botany, University of Nebraska. 

Qbservations and experiments made upon many plants in 
the physiological laboratory and the plant houses of the 
University of Nebraska, show that under certain conditions 
water may exude in drops from the surface or margins of 
leaves. It is well known, of course, that water escapes from 
living leaves in the form of vapor whenever the air is not 
saturated with moisture. Thus, when a geranium plant is 
placed upon one of the pans of a pair of scales (after wrap- 
ping the pot with sheet rubber so as to prevent evaporation 
from the soil), it is found that in a little time the loss of 
water vapor from the leaves is great enough to be readily 
measured. If the plant be allowed to remain upon the scale 
pan for a day or two, the amount of water lost will be quite 
considerable in quantity and weight. This kind of water- 
loss has been well-known for a long time, but there is 
another loss of water with which we have not been so famil- 
iar. To show this, experiments were made as follows : 

1. In a box of sandy soil, fifty or more kernels of wheat 
were planted and kept growing vigorously until the plants 
were two or three inches high. They were kept well watered, 
so that the roots were fully supplied with water. The air 
of the laboratory during the experiment was pretty dry, re- 
quiring the roots to be quite active in absorbing water to 
make good the loss of water by evaporation from the leaves. 
The box was then put over a warm radiator, and the soil 
slowly warmed to a temperature of 77° to 78° Fahrenheit. 
After an hour or so, drops of water were observed upon the 
leaves, and these continued to increase in spite of the fact 
that the humidity of the air was shown by observation to be 
only 31 per cent. 

2. Another box, containing vigorously-growing wheat 
plants, was treated as follows : Warm water was slowly 
poured upon the soil, so as to quite considerably raise the 
temperature. The box was then put under a bell-jar and 
the temperature of the air suddenly lowered by sprinkling 
the bell-jar with water, when water was seen to ooze from 
the leaves, usually near the tips. This was repeated again 
and again, always with the same result. 

3. Similar trials were made with small plants of maize 
(Indian corn) with similar results. 

4. In the plant house, small cabbage plants were observed 



to exude drops of water from the projecting points on their 
margins under similar conditions. 

Here we have an exudation of water-drops (known as 
"guttation ") quite resembling the dew which so often wets 
the grass. At first we might suppose it to be nothing more 
than dew, but careful tests, which I need not describe here, 
show it to be an actual exudation. It appears that the roots 
in the warm, moist soil become very active in absorbing 
water to supply the water-loss through leaf-evaporation, and 
when the latter is suddenly checked by the cooling of the 
air, and consequent increase in its humidity, the root-pressure 
forces out the water in the little drops just described. When 
unusually active, the roots may even force out drops in dry, 
warm air, as in one of the experiments described above. 
Exudation may thus take place when the soil is moist and 
warm, especially when, with these conditions, the air is 
quickly changed from a hot and dry to a cooler and more 
humid condition. 



CROP CONDITIONS. 

The warm and pleasant weather the first three weeks of 
March allowed farm work to be pushed rapidly forward, ex- 
cept in the northwestern portion of the State, where very 
little, if any, farm work had been done even at the end of 
the month. Low temperature, accompanied in the eastern 
sections by some sleet and snow, retarded all work during 
the last ten days of the month. 

The soil is in excellent condition in most parts of the 
State; however, in a few of the western counties, it is too 
dry for seed to germinate, and in the extreme southeastern 
corner, it is rather wet to be worked. 

Generally, farm work was further advanced at the end 
of the month than it is usually at this season of the year. 
Seeding of spring wheat was well advanced — about com- 
pleted in many sections — and the acreage for the season 
promises to be above the average in all districts. Oat 
sowing has commenced quite generally. Breaking of corn 
stalks and the preparation of corn ground for the plow is 
well advanced and a little plowing for corn had been done 
in the southern counties. Winter wheat made good prog- 
ress up to the cold weather of the last ten days of the 
month. There is some doubt as to the effect of this unfav- 
orable weather, but the general opinion is that the wheat is 
not injured appreciably. 



COMPARISON OF PAST MARCHES. 

The monthly maximum and minimum temperatures for several sta- 
tions have been obtained for the years 1870 to 1888, and the following 
table has been revised, and differs slightly from the comparative tables 
previously published : 



-—Temperature.^ 

Mean. Max. Min. Prec. 

1876 26.6 66—9 1.85 

r877 32-8 74 — 4 0.76 

1878 44.1 80 19 1.95 

1879 40.1 86 3 0.70 

1880 32.8 80 —2i 0.50 

1881 30.3 81 —10 1. 51 

1882 39.2 77 4 0.51 

1883 33.6 75 — 2 0.50 

1884 33-6 73 — 5 1-96 

1SS5 35.6 70—8 0.46 

1886 30.5 73 — 15 2.01 

1887 37.8 80 —18 0.39 

[888 27.6 80 —15 2.13 



r- Temperature.— , 

Mean. Max. Min. Prec. 

1889 40.4 76 4 1.06 

1890 34.0 75—7 0.84 

1891 26.9 75 —38 1.86 

1892 33.3 82 —19 1.62 

1893 3'- 6 96 — 18 0.32 

1894 38.2 88 — 9 0.90 

1895 35-9 94 —20 0.72 

1896 30.5 90 —24 1.45 

1897 34.2 82 —14 .1.49 

1898 35.0 Sr —14 0.61 

Average for tlie 
State for past 

23 years 34.1 80 — 10 1.1S 



\uuxiyin. x xii i\y\u 



uiiurcs: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



March, 1898. 



SLEET AND HAIL. 

The following extract from "Davis's Elementary Meteor? 
ology," will probably aid voluntary observers in distinguish- 
ing between sleet and hail : "Hail should be distinguished 
from the (dear icy pellets, which sometimes fall in the win- 
ter season, but never in the summer; and also from round 
pellets of snow of loose structure, called soft hail, again a 
product of winter instead of summer. Hail does not fall in 
winter, but is a common accompaniment of thunderstorms." 



CLIMATOLOGY OF THE MONTH. 

General characteristics : The month was characterized by 
normal temperature and deficient precipitation. The cold- 
est weather of the month occurred during the last ten days, 
when the minimum temperatures were below zero in the 
northwestern section and but slightly above zero in other 
sections. A cold wave was felt on the 21st, and the lowest 
temperature was quite generally recorded on the morning of 
the 22d. A few exceptional temperature falls are as follows : 
Crete, 30° in 30 minutes, 40° in 2 hours, and 68° in 12 hours ; 
Geneva, 64° in 8 hours ; Genoa, 40° in 4 hours ; Ravenna, 
52° in 5A. hours and 64° in 16| hours; Beaver City, 66° in 12 
hours. 

The precipitation was below normal throughout the State, 
except a small area in Burt County and a small district in 
the extreme southeastern portion of the State. The 23d was 
the only day without precipitation somewhere in the State. 
The 10th, 11th. 14th, 18th, and 27th were the days of gen- 
eral precipitation. 

Auroras were reported on the 3d, 13th, 14th, 15th, and 
18th. On the 14th and 15th, the aurora was especially bril- 
liant, and was noticed at many stations. Mr. Win. N. Hun- 
ter, at Turlington, reports : 

The aurora of the 15th, from 7.35 to 7.55 p. m., was in form of vertical 
shafts of milk white light extending to the zenith and traveling rapidly 
from northeast to northwest. The shafts were three in number, the 
first being the largest. 

Mr. P. H. Salter writes : 

On afternoon of the 14th, after the wind had been blowing a gale 
from the south, a thunderstorm came up, and it rained hard for a few 
minutes. In the evening, the most beautiful aurora I have ever seen 
was observed. It was red. and very brilliant. The light was so strong 
that one could almost see to read. The aurora on the night of the 15th 
was not so bright. 

Atmospheric pressure: The mean pressure was 30.06 inches, 
which is slightly below the normal for March. The highest 
during the month was 30.55 inches, at Omaha and Ashland 
on the 30th; the lowest, 29.40 inches, at Ashland on the 14th. 

Temperature: The mean temperature for the State was 
35.0°, as determined from the records of 107 stations, which 
is nearly 1° above the normal. The highest temperature 
was 81°, at Curtis on the 8th, and the lowest, 14° below 
zero, at Gering on the 22d. 

Wind: The prevailing direction of the wind was from the 

northwest . The average velocity was 10.0 miles an hour, 

which is about 1.0 mile above the normal. The highest 

velocity was 52 miles an hour, at Lincoln on the 21st, from 

r 



Precipitation: The average precipitation for the State was 
0.61 of an inch, as determined from the records of 134 sta- 
tions, which is only about 52 per cent of the normal. The 
average snowfall (in inches) for the several sections was as 
follows: Southeastern, 4.1 ; northeastern, 4.7 ; central, 2.0; 
southwestern, 1.6; western, 3.4; northwestern, 5.8. The 
average snowfall for the State was 3.6 inches. The largest 
precipitation reported at any one station was 2.25 inches, at 
Burchard, and the least was trace, at several stations in the 
western section. 

Wind and humidity table. 





Wind. 


H 


imidity. 


Stations. 


Miles. 


Mean. 


Max. 


Dir. 


Date. 


Mean. 


Low- 
est. 


Date. 


Lincoln 

North Platte 


9,908 
7,980 
6,848 


13-3 
10.7 
9.2 


5 2 
48 
36 


nw. 
nw. 
se. 


21 
14 
14 


69.8 
64.9 
67.6 


28 
20 
24 


21 
24 
■5 






Means for the six equal sections of the State. 



Sections 



Southeastern . 
Northeastern. 

Central 

Southwestern 

Western 

Northwestern 

State 



Temperature. 



Mean. 



38.9 
35-5 
35-6 
37-6 
31-9 
3°-3 

35-0 



35-9 
32-5 
32.7 
35-2 
33-5 
32.0 

33-6 



Precipitation. 



Mean. 



1. 13 

1.02 
0.32 
0.26 
0.36 
0.56 

0.61 



Aver- 
age.* 



1-52 
■■33 
1.16 
0.91 
0.81 
1.22 

1. 16 



Number of days — 



Rainy. Clear. JJJJSgj. Cloudy. 



3-.S 
4-7 
•■9 
1.8 
2.6 
3-6 
3-° 



12.7 

130 
16.0 

14- 5 
■5-4 
16.4 

14-7 



12.0 
II. 4 

8.6 
11. 1 
9-i 
9-4 
10.3 



6.3 
6.6 

6.4 

5-5 
6.4 

5-2 

6.1 



* For ten years. t For twenty years. 

Supplemental precipitation table. 



Stations. 



Alma 

Benedict 

Burchard 

Cody 

Cornlea 

Culbertson 

Dannebrog 

Dawson 

Divide 

Eden 

Elba 

Ewing 

Fairfield 

Fairmont 

Gordon 

Haigler 

Hayes Center... 

Hickman 

Hooper 

Johnston 

Lyons 

McCoolJunct. . . 

Marquette 

Merriman 

Monroe 

Nemaha 

Norman 

Ord 

Osceola 

Ough 

Palmer 

Plattsmouth — 

St. Libory 

Salem 

Sargent 

Schuyler 

Sioux City, Iowa 

Stockham 

Strang 

Stratton 

Sutton 

Syracuse 

Table Hock 

Valparaiso 

Wallace 

Wilber 

Willard 

Wisner 

Wvmore 

Yankton, S. Dak 



Counties. 



Harlan 

York 

Pawnee — 

Cherry 

Platte 

Hitchcock . 
Howard . .. 
Richardson 
Sherman . . . 
Nemaha . . . 

Howard 

Holt 

Clay 

Fillmore .. . 
Sheridan . . . 

Dundy 

Hayes 

Lancaster . 

Dodge 

Brown 

Burt 

York 

Hamilton .. 

Cherry 

Platte 

Nemaha . . . 
Kearney . . . 

Valley 

Polk 

Dundy 

Merrick 

Cass 

Howard . . 
Richardson 

Custer 

Colfax 



Hamilton . 
Fillmore .. 
Hitchcock 

Clay 

Otoe 

Pawnee . . . 
Saunders.. 
Lincoln . . . 

Saline 

Lincoln . . . 
Cuming ... 
Oage 



Length 
of rec- 
orders 



Total. 



0. 17 

°-95 
2.25 
0.80 

0.77 
o. 24 



2.02 
0.22 
1.69 
0.31 
1. 18 
0.36 
0.30 
o. 10 

0.70 
0.40 

1.85 

1-5" 

0-33 
1.24 
0.70 
0.50 
0.20 
0.47 
1. 61 
0.63 
0.22 
1 .00 
0.4.S 
0.85 
°-95 
0.65 
0.80 



o-73 
0.90 
0.50 
0.60 
0.24 



1.72 
2.05 
0.85 
0.30 
1. 10 
0.07 
1. Si 
I-9.S 
1. 00 



Depart 
ure from 
normal. 



— °-35 
—0.79 



+0. 12 
—0.14 



-0.36 



-0.58 



-0.44 
-0.86 
-1.64 



-o. 14 

-0.45 
-0.32 



-0.07 
-0.97 



No. 
rainy 
days. 



Observers. 



R.E. Pitcher. 

R.B. Brabham. 

J. A.Kinsey. 

C.M.Heinl'y. 

E.J. Couch. 

Mrs.L. A. Wibley. 

W. J.Melson. 

M. L.Libbee. 

M.H.Smith. 

D.J.Wood. 

Mark Holm. 

G. H.Benson. 

M. L.. Tones. 

G.H.Borden. 

Amos Burwell. 

T.P.F. Haine. 

R.C.Orr. 

N.J. Kuhlman. 

T.W.Lyman. 

D.W. Alspaugh. 

N.R.Kellam. 

F.S.Morris. 

John Ellis. 

F. Hussong. 

Wm. Webster. 

R.J. Duff. 

3. F.Barnes. 

Jas. Milford. 

(i. W.Murbarger. 

Wm.Ough. 

W.S.Green. 

W.Z.Pickett. 

W.I.Meader. 

W.W.MeDermet. 

J.S.Spooner. 

L.N.Dickinson. 

Weather Bureau. 

J.W.Gray. 

S.Diller. 

C.W.Shurtliff. 

Dr. J.M. Birkner. 

L. Howell. 

S.H.Dopp. 

W.J.Craven. 

A. E.Yocum. 

S.E.Davis. 

Wesley W.Lewis. 

N-C. Sears. 

L.S.Sage. 

Weather Bureau. 



March, 1898. 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



Climatological data for Nebraska, March, 1898. 



Stations. 



NORTHEASTERN SEC. 

Agee * 

Blair 

Columbus 

Creighton 

Fremont 

Hartington 

Lynch* 

Madison* a 

Norfolk 

Oakdale 

Omaha 

O'Neill 

Santee Agency 

Stanton* 

Tekamah 

Wakefield 

Westpoint 

Southeastern Sec. 

Arborville* 

Ashland 

Auburn * 

Aurora* 

Beatrice 

Chester * 

Crete 

David City* 

Edgar* 

Pairbury 

Geneva 

Harvard* 

Hebron 

Lincoln 

Nebraska City 

Odell* 

Rulo* 

Seward* 

Superior* 

Tecumseh 

Turlington 

Weepingwater* 

York* 

Central Sec 

Albion c 

Ansley 

Ashton* 

Brokenbow* 

Burwell* 

Callaway 

Central City* 

Dunning* 

Ericson * 

Genoa 

Gothenburg 

Grand Island 

Greeley * 

Kearney * 

Lexington 

Loup* 

North Loup 

Ravenna 

St. Paul* 

Southwestern Sec. 

Arapahoe * 

Beaver City 

Benkelman* 

Bluehill* 

Curtis 

Franklin 

Hastings* 

Holdrege * 

Imperial 

Indianola (near) * 

McCook* 

Madrid * 

Minden 

Redcloud * 

Republican * 

Wilsonville 

Western Sec. 

Camp Clarke 

Gering 

Kimball 

Lodgepole 

Nesbit 

North Platte 

Seneca* 

Thedford * 

Whitman* 

Northwestern Sec 

Alliance* 

Fort Robinson 

Hay Springs 

Kennedy 

Kirkwood * 

Springview 

Valentine 



Counties. 



Holt 

Washington. 

Platte 

Knox 

Dodge 

Cedar 

Boyd 

Madison 

...do 

Antelope 

Douglas 

Dolt. 

Knox 

Stanton 

Burt 

Dixon 

Cuming 



York 

Saunders 

Nemaha 

Hamilton . . . 

Gage 

Thayer 

Saline 

Butler 

Clay 

Jefferson — 

Fillmore 

Clay 

Thayer 

Lancaster... 

Otoe 

Gage 

Richardson . 

Seward 

Nuckolls 

Johnson 

Otoe 

Cass 

York 



Boone — 
Custer . . . 
Sherman . 
Custer . . . 
Garfield .. 
Custer . . . 
Merrick .. 

Blaine 

Wheeler.. 
Platte 
Dawson . . 

Hall 

Greeley .. 
Buffalo... 
Dawson . . 
Sherman . 
Valley ... 
Buffalo... 
Howard.. 



Furnas 

...do 

Dundy 

Webster 

Frontier 

Franklin 

Adams 

Phelps 

Chase 

Frontier — 
Red Willow. 

Perkins 

Kearney 

Webster 

Harlan 

Furnas 



Ohevenne .. . 
Seotts Bluff. 

Kimball 

Cheyenne ... 

Logan 

Lincoln 

Thomas 

...do 

Grant 



Box Butte . . . 

Dawes 

Sheridan 

Cherry 

Rock 

Keya Paha . . . 
Cherry 



,472 
,060 
,387 
>3'3 



, 100 
,051 
.792 
-235 
,618 
,3** 
,619 
,722 
,316 
,633 
,812 
,458 
.199 

94' 
,278 

842 
,435 
,574 
,"3 
,214 
,080 
,642 

1,747 
2,307 
2,o6t 

2,477 
2,180 

2, 555 
1 , 708 
2,621 
2,029 
1,584 
2,557 
1,860 
2,010 
2, 146 
2,385 
2,067 
1,961 
2,028 
1.796 

2, '73 
2,147 
2,968 
1,967 
2,553 
1,820 
',932 
2,324 
3,278 



2,506 
3, '294 
2, 169 
1,687 
1,939 



3,70o 



4,697 
3,820 



2,841 
2,97' 
2,842 
3,588 

3,968 
3,764 
3,821 



2,613 



Temperature, in degrees Fahrenheit. 



32.2 
36.7 
37-o 
34-4 
37-6 
33-7 
32.1 
35-6 
36.6 
34-7 
39-2 
32-7 
35-7 
34-4 
37-1 
36.2 
37-0 

34-6 
39-8 
40.6 
37-1 
38.3 
39-8 
39-6 
35-8 
36.2 
39-8 
37-2 
37-2 
39-3 
39-2 
38.5 
39-3 
41.4 
37-8 
39- o 
40.5 
34.o 
35-6 
37- o 

36-3 
36.1 



36.6 
3'.o 
34-8 
36.7 
34-2 
32.5 
37-0 
37-2 
37-o 
33-0 
3'-4 
37-1 
36.1 
36.5 
37-2 
38.6 

36.1 
39-7 
34.1 
38.7 
40. 2 
40.4 
37-7 
34-5 
36.2 
36.8 
40.9 
34-1 
37-5 
40.4 

44-5 
38.0 

33-4 
24-3 
3'-2 
32.4 
33-8 
35-6 
33-4 
32.0 
29.6 

24.7 
28.8 
29.6 
33-2 
3'-6 
3'- 8 
32.5 



s 



+ 1.1 



+5-1 
+4-3 
+3-6 



+5-3 
+4-1 
+4-0 
+2.6 
+4-4 
+ 2.4 
+ 1.6 



+i-3 
+ 3-' 
+ 3-6 



+ 1-3 



+4-3 
+5-3 



+0.4 
+3-7 
+ 1.8 

+ '■3 
+ 2.0 



+ 0.3 

+ 2-7 
+3-5 



+ 2.0 
— °-5 



—2.4 
+ 1.2 
+ '•7 
+ 1.8 
+ 0.6 
+4-5 



+4-3 



+ '■5 
+3^6 



+3-8 
+4-3 
+0.2 
+0.9 



—0.7 
+ 2.1 



-8.3 
— 1.8 



+ 0.4 

+2: 4 ' 



—5-2 

—0.8 
+1.0 



—0.4 

+ '•5 



25 



8t 



7S 



24t 



8t 



8t 



8t 



— 3 

— '4 

— 6 

— 5 

— 4 

— 1 

— 4 

— 4 

— 5 

— 6 

— 6 

— 9 

— 5 

— 1 

— 1 

— 4 



60 



4S 



53 



Precipitation, in inches. 



O& 



0.41 
1.29 
0.82 
I-I3 
i-75 
1-23 
0.52 
0.86 
0.72 
0.69 
'• '5 
0-75 
0.60 

°-75 

2. 10 
1.22 

1.07 

0.63 

i-5> 

1.77 
o.74 
1.88 
o-57 
0.40 

o-75 
0.30 
1.30 
0.25 
0.40 
0.88 
1.40 

I-I5 

2. 11 
2.10 
0.60 
o- 55 
1 ■ 55 
1.3a 
1.36 
o-75 

0.20 
o. 10 



0.05 
0.60 
0.22 
0.26 
0.20 
0.82 
0.50 
0-77 
0.20 
0.04 
o. 10 

0.03 

0.20 

0.23 

0-54 

T. 

o. 16 
0.40 
0.08 
0.25 
0.05 
0.25 
0.03 
0.56 

0.2.S 
0.20 
0.30 
0.32 
O.25 
O.08 

T. 

o-75 
0.30 
o.75 
o. 10 
0.30 
0.64 
o. 10 

0.35 

0.20 

0.30 
I.30 

0.88 
0.64 
0.72 
0.32 
0-57 



s 

= 2 



— 0.96 



—0-35 
— 0.07 
— 0.09 
—0.43 
—0.75 
— 0.26 
—0-33 
— o. 45 
—0-37 
—0.81 
—0.48 
—0.30 
+ 0.59 



—0.49 

—0.99 

+ 0. 11 
—0.76 



+ 0.31 



-1.56 
— 1. 12 



— o. 15 

—0-97 
—0.82 
—0.82 
+ 0.01 
— 0.42 



— 0.27 
—0.31 



-0.04 
-0.72 



— 1.28 
— 0.64 

— 1.19 
—0.52 
— 1.20 
—0.58 



-0.66 



— 1. 00 
-'•23 



—0.82 
— 1. 19 



-0-59 



—0.94 
— 1.28 
— 1. 12 
— 0.62 



— 0.78 
— 1.22 
—0.32 



-0.58 
-0.27 



-0.27 

-O. II 



—0.97 

— '•'3 
+0.06 
—0.82 

— '■'3 



— 0.90 
— 0.96 



o. 19 
0.45 
0.47 
0.60 
0.S5 
0.62 
o. 17 
0.50 
°-35 
0.46 
o-57 
0.36 
0.29 
0.24 
0.80 
0.60 
0-53 

0.30 

0-75 
o-95 
0-39 
0.88 
0.40 
0.30 
0.60 
0.30 
0.61 
o-'5 
0.20 
0.50 

o.45 
0.50 
1.38 
1.05 
0.20 
0-55 
0.85 
0.49 
0.50 
0.50 

o. 12 
o. 10 



0.05 
0.60 
0.20 

O. II 
0.20 
O.3O 

O.50 

0.35 
0.20 
0.O2 
0. 10 

0.03 

O. 20 
O. 18 
O.24 

T. 

O. 12 
0.25 
0.08 
O.25 
0.05 
O.25 
O.O3 
0.20 
O.25 
0.20 
0.30 
O.25 
O.I5 
O.08 



0.60 

o. 10 

0.30 

o. 10 
0.25 

0.50 

o. 10 
0-25 
0.20 



0.20 
0.60 

0.30 

0.26 
0.40 
o. 16 
o. 16 



Eg 



T. 

7.2 
5.0 
4.0 
9.0 

5-5 
2.8 
4.0 
3-o 
'•9 



3-5 
4-5 
3-5 
10. 
5-0 
5-8 

5-o 
9-5 
1.0 

3-5 
3-0 
4-2 
4.0 
7-0 
3-o 
2.0 
1.9 
2-5 
4.0 

8-3 



2.0 
T. 
4.0 
2.0 



5-o 
6-5 

7-5 



T. 

6.0 

2.2 

2.0 
2.0 
3-4 
5-0 
3-6 
2.0 
0.2 
1.0 
T. 
2.0 
1.8 
2.0 



2.5 

1.0 
3-o 
0.5 

2-5 

0-3 
2-5 
2-5 
2.0 

3-o 
2.2 
2.5 
0.8 



7-5 
3-0 
7-5 
1.0 
2.0 



3-5 
2.0 

3-0 
'3-0 
5-6 
4-5 
5-2 
3-2 



S 



Sky. 






©•a 



.ST3 



nw. 

se. 

n. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

sw. 

nw. 

nw. 



se. 
se. 
se. 

s. 

se. 

nw. 

nw. 

s. 

nw. 

nw. 



s. 

nw. 

se. 

nw. 

nw. 

ne. 



nw. 
nw. 
nw. 



nw. 
nw. 
nw. 



nw. 

n. 

nw. 

sw. 

nw. 

n. 

sw. 

nw. 

se. 

n. 



nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

w. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

ne. 

nw. 
nw. 
nw. 
nw. 
nw 
nw 
nw. 



Observers. 



R.E.Bowden. 

E. A. Palmer. 
C.C.Gray. 

Dr. Geo. Roberts. 

Win. J. Phillips. 

T. B.A.Watson. 

C.C.Irwin. 

F.A.Long. 

P.H.Salter. 

G.S.Clingman. 

U. S. Weather Bureau. 

O.M.Collins. 

W.H.Hamlin. 

W.Gerecke. 

Dr. A. D. Nesbit. 

I. H. Weaver. 

C.J.Kadish. 

E.D.Smith. 

Dr. A. S. v Mansfelde. 

G.D.Carrington. 

H.C.Miller. 

C. Kellam. 

Stephen Forsdick. 

Doane College. 

E.B.Taylor. 

J. W. Hoberg. 

Herman Conerus. 

F.M.Flory. 

Dr. J. T.Fleming. 

Dr.C.M.Easton 

U. S. Weather Bureau. 

E.Morton. 

W.F.Denton. 

W.F.Gingrich. 

L.E.Ost. 

J. II. Harrington. 

C.M.Miller. 

Wm.N. Hunter. 

G. Treat. 

J.F. Barnes. 

F. A.Pettinger. 
Chas.R.Hare. 
F. Rein. 

W. L. Henry. 

F.L. Rector. 

Geo.B.Mair. 

J.A.McRae. 

E.E.Bolejack. 

A.Dahl. 

Geo.S. Truman. 

A.V.Carlson. 

E.Corbin. 

J. A. Pinkerton. 

C.E. Magner. 

Ira P.Griswold. 

A.S.Iiayhurst. 

J.E.Goodrich. 

Erastus Smith. 

Paul Anderson. 

J F.Edwards. 
C.G.George. 

W.E. Winger. 
C.S. Draper. 
Dr. S.R. Razee. 
F.T.Owen. 
J.C.Swarts. 
C. Engstrom. 
Robert Malcolm. 
Clara A. Dobson. 
C.T.Watson. 
John McKenzie. 
Joel Hull. 
W.K.Hayes. 
W. Burdon. 
I). M. Knapp. 

Robt. H.Willis. 
J.P.Pinley. 

F.J. Bellows. 

A.B.Persinger. 

O.E.Bolkrom. 

U. S. Weather Bureau. 

D.McNall. 

O.G.Norton. 

J.L.Crossley. 

J.W.Wollick. 
Post surgeon. 
C. A. Waterman. 
1> A.Piercy. 
Mrs.C.A.Arter. 
Miss Ezada Phelps. 
1 T. Watsoi 



* Temperature data 
411 rppords are used 



from thermometers not self registering I Occurred on more than ne day. a, h, c, etc., indicate number of days mi"sUie from observed readings, 
in determinin? State or district means, but State and district do narr urns are determined bv conn, -'-;„:: of current data of only stations with normals. 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



March, 1898. 



g =• 

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Ul IV 



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no CM co o ro 
cm oco* ■* <0 

CM CN w CM CM 



o no 



\T?IV 



00 oo' CTvO 



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On'O OO OC Ov 
■- t^OO 00 00 



to rC u~; a> 



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t-^ o-oo" 



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SO (>*£>' 6 oo' 



.t K,o0 O* (^ 
N ■* C7\ rh <n 



00 oo' 



UIJV 



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xi:jv 



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uijv 



xhjv 



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if ; ■* ■* CM "O 



j co i-^ in cm cm cm co *o 



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r*l -^- c*1nQ rp 



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no "", < r . i^- r^- 



vo c-^no *f) ^* no t^.«o no no no r— NO NO NO 



If; t"»>0 *0 NO 



if) i>- u", o no t^. « r>. i 

nC nO no t^-vo \D NO no N, 



[*",nO io On O »f) O 



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f.NO Of, no O 



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CN u-,nO O •- CO ^3" O OC ■ 



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cm o «*: if) o 



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0*000 it no — 00 NO 



OC I-» - NO CM 



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\C \c r-~ if . t^ 



r* r*3 Lf.NO i 



it cm no r--co 



NO+N O 



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CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



March, 1898. 















Daily precipitation 


for 


Nebraska 


, March, 1898 




























Stations. 


Day of month. 




i. 


2. 


3- 


4- 


5- 


6. 


7- 


8. 


9- 


10. 


11. 


12. 


>3- 


14- 


15- 


16. 


17- 


18. 


'9- 


20. 


21. 


22. 


23- 


24- 


25- 


26. 


27- 


28. 


29. 


3°- 


' 


O 
Eh 






t 


t 








+ 


•19 








■ 17 








■05 




t 


t 


t 








t 


+ 




t 




t 






















































.20 

. 10 

+ 
•3° 






















.10 






















0.30 


















t 
























t 


















t 
























































t 




t 








t 
















.08 

.28 
.40 

■39 
.40 








•05 
.12 

t 


















.20 

• 75 

• 17 








t 
t 




















.36 


















+ 
t 
t 






































•95 

•3° 
.88 
.12 
•25 
.08 


























t 
























■05 








































•3" 














•3° 








1.88 


































.04 






















+ 
















•15 




























t 




































































t 










0.08 






















































































•°5 
t 
. 10 






















t 

1 

•05 

t 










t 
































.60 
t 
.40 














t 

t 

.11 




































t 






t 








.60 
. to 






















t 
.02 

+ 










0.75 












•°5 




•°s 


.02 






















0.57 












t 




. 12 

t 






•47 
.05 














.05 








0.82 
















.40 
.30 
• 24 
•25 




.60 
















.08 








i-'3 
















t 
























.05 








































t 


















0.24 
0.2^ 

o-75 
0.26 


















t 










t 
t 












































t 






.60 












t 


















•15 








t 
















. 11 


. 10 


.05 
• 3° 
.20 
.61 

t 












t 










































































0.30 




































t 

t 
t 
+ 




















t 


t 




.22 

t 


0.20 




























t 

t 






.40 
















t 


•07 

t 

+ 

+ 

■3° 
•15 
.04 


1.30 






















•3° 


t 






























t 






t 




.40 






.60 










t 






•30 






+ 




.... 


1.30 










■ °5 
.85 

■ 04 
• 3° 




0.05 

1.75 




























.40 








.20 
+ 
.11 
























t 
t 
■ 19 






























.06 








t 
















t 


0.25 




























•13 

. 10 












• 05 




r , ■ 




















. 10 
t 
.28 














■o.s 


•°5 
















0.30 
0.50 
0-77 




















t 


• 5° 


t 
t 










t 

t 








t 
.07 
























•35 








.c8 










































.20 








t 
t 








































.40 








.62 






•03 
+ 
+ 
















•°3 
•05 


t 


•15 




•'5 


'• 2 3 
0.40 
0.25 
0.40 
88 






















.20 






+ 




































•25 
• 40 




























t 








































































•■5 


t 






. 11. 


. 10 


t 






■30 














■ 15 


t 








t 










.c8 






















• 27 
■63 

+ 

.02 












. 11 
. 10 








88 






















■ 03 
.18 
















■*5 








































t 


0.03 
o.=6 
0.04 
0.64 
0-75 
0.72 












.20 






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U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. 



REPORT FOR JULY. 1898. 



NEBRASKA SECTION 



OF THE 



CLIMATE AND CROP SERVICE 



OF THE 



WEATHER BUREAU. 



PUBLISHED BY AUTHORITY OF THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE. 



UNDER DIRECTION OF 

WILLIS L. MOORE 

CHIEF OF WEATHER BUREAU 



BY 



G. A. bOVELifl^D, 

OBSERVER AND SECTION DIRECTOR. 

Office, University of Nebraska, bincolo. 




CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



July, 1808. 



CROP CONDITIONS. 
The first ten days of the month were very favorable for 
all crops. The rainfall was below normal, but was sufficient 
tor crop needs. The harvest of winter wheat and rye, which 
was commenced the last week in June, was pushed rapidly 
forward. All small grain ripened rapidly — a little too rap- 
idly for the best yield. The next two weeks were dry and 
hot, exceedingly favorable for harvesting, and most of the 
small grain crop was secured in exceptionally fine condition, 
although the harvest was not completed in the northern 
counties at the end of the month. Except in the northern 
counties, corn was considerably damaged by drought during 
this period. Light rains were general during the last week 
<>f the month, somewhat relieving the droughty conditions. 



COMPARISON OF PAST JULYS. 
The monthly maximum and minimum temperatures for several sta- 
tions have been obtained for the years 1876 to 1888, and the following 
table has been revised, and differs slightly from the comparative tallies 
previously published : 

.—Temperature.^ 



Mean. Max. Mill. 

1S76 75.9 103 48 

1S77 75-2 107 45 

187S 75.5 100 52 

1879 75-2 99 

1880 73.4 105 

1881 75.8 104 

1882 70.8 99 

(■883 74.0 109 

1884 74.7 101 

1SS5 75.1 100 

1886 75.2 110 

1887 75.6 106 

188R 77.0 105 



53 
45 
58 
45 
40 
40 
48 
55 
38 
42 



Pree. 

4.28 
'•45 
5-71 
5-92 
3-36 
3-38 
3-40 
2.81 
5-79 
4-32 
1.84 
3.10 
3.10 



—Temperature.^ 

Mean. Max. Min. 

1889 73.4 in 38 

1890 78.8 112 40 

1891 70.1 102 37 

1892 75.0 113 40 

1893 75.7 110 41 

1894 76.4 >I4 43 

1895 72.7 "° 36 

1896 74.3 109 44 

1897 75-9 i'2 34 

1898 74.8 108 35 

Average for the 

State for past 

23 years 74.8 106 43 



Prec. 

5-77 
2. 10 
5-47 
2-57 
2.62 
'■43 
i-73 
3.87 
2-57 

2. 12 



CLIMATOLOGY OF THE MONTH. 

General characteristics: The month was characterized by 
low temperature and deficient precipitation. The hottest 
period was from the 18th to the 27th, when the temperature 
was normal or slightly above; during the other portions of 
the month it was below normal on most days. The precip- 
itation was above normal in the extreme northern counties 
and below normal elsewhere. The greatest deficiency was in 
Colfax, Butler, Polk, York, Fillmore, Thayer, and Jefferson 
counties, where it ranged from 3 to 4 inches. The actual 
rainfall in a considerable portion of that district was less 
than half an inch. 

Atmospheric pressure: The mean pressure was 29.95 inches, 
which is about the normal for July. The highest during 
the month was 30.28 inches, at Lincoln on the 3d, and the 
lowest, 29.52 inches, at North Platte on the 17th. 

Temperature: The mean temperature for the State was 
74.0°, as determined from the records of 88 stations, which, 
is slightly more than 1° below the normal. The highest 
temperature was 108°, at Bluehill on the 24th. and the low- 
est, 35°, at Gering on the 5th. 

Wind: The prevailing direction of the wind was from the 
southeast. The average velocity was 8.1 miles an hour, 
which is about 0.4 of a mile above the normal. The highest 
velocity was 30 miles an hour, at Lincoln on the 29th, from 
the northwest. 

Precipitation: The average precipitation for the State was 
2.12 inches, as determined from the records of 132 stations, 
which is about GO per cent of the normal. The largest pre- 



cipitation reported at any one station was 11.53 inches, at 
Plattsmouth, and the least, trace, at Fairmont and Valpa- 
raiso. The precipitation for the first seven months of the 
year was 90 per cent of the normal, and for the first five 
months of the crop season (March, April, May, June, and 
July) it was 90 per cent of the normal. 

Hail: Hail fell on the 3d, 19th, 25th, 28th, 29th, and 30th. 

Thunderstorms: Thunderstorms occurred on the 1st, 2d, 
6th, 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th, 11th, 13th, 18th, 19th, 20th, 21st, 
23d, 24th, 25th, 26th, 27th, 28th, 29th, and 30th. 

Wind and humidity table. 



Stations. 



Lincoln 

North Platte 
Omaha 



Wind. 



Miles. Mean. Max. Dir. Date 



7,174 
6,59° 
5.399 



9.6 
8.9 
7-3 



Humidity. 



66.8 
66.1 
64.8 



Low- 



Means for the six equal sections of the State. 



Sections. 



Southeastern . . 
Northeastern., 

Central 

Southwestern , 

Western 

Northwestern 



State. 



Temperature. 



76.1 
73-6 
73-9 
76.2 
71. 1 
72.8 

74-o 



Aver- 



76.7 
75-4 
75-4 
77-5 
73-8 
73-i 
75-3 



Precipitation. 



Mean. 



i-79 
2.30 
1.44 
1.83 
2.38 
3-°i 
2. 12 



Aver- 
age.t 



4.27 
3-86 
4.06 

3-79 
2.46 
2-55 
3-5° 



Number of days- 



Rainy. Clear. ( ^ u ^ Cloudy. 



16.9 
17-5 
21.6 
16.9 

19. 5 
20.4 

18.8 



11. 8 

11. 2 
7.0 

11. 8 
8.3 
7-4 
9-6 



2-3 
2.2 
2.4 
2-3 
3-2 
3-2 

2.6 



* For ten years. t For twenty years. 

Supplemental precipitation table. 



Stations 



Bassett 

Bellevue 

Benedict 

Burchard 

Cody 

Corn lea 

Culbertson . . . 
Dannebrog — 

Divide 

Eden 

Elba 

Ewing 

Fairfield 

Fairmont 

Gordon 

Haigler 

Hayes Center. 

Hickman 

Hooper 

Johnstown . . . 

Lyons 

McCoolJunct. 

Marquette 

Merriman 

Monroe 

Nemaha 

Norden 

Norman 

Ord 

Osceola 

Ough 

Palmer 

Plattsmouth .. 

St.Libory 

Salem 

Sargent 

Schuyler 

Sioux City, Iowa 

Stockham 

Strang 

Stratton 

Syracuse 

Table Bock 

Valparaiso 

Wauneta 

Wilber 

Willard 

Wisner 

Wymore 

Yankton, S. Dak 



Rock 

Sarpy 

York 

Pawnee — 

Cherry 

Platte 

Hitchcock . 
Howard . . 
Sherman . . . 
Nemaha . .. 

Howard 

Holt 

Clay 

Fillmore . . . 
Sheridan . . . 

Dundy 

Hayes 

Lancaster . 

Dodge 

Brown 

Burt 

York 

Hamilton . . 

Cherry 

Platte 

Nemaha . .. 
Keya Paha. 
Kearney . . . 

Valley 

Polk 

, Dundy 

Merrick — 

Gass 

Howard ... 
Richardson 

Custer 

Colfax 



Hamilton . . 
Fillmore . . . 
Hitchcock . 

Otoe 

Pawnee 

Saunders. . . 

Chase 

Saline 

Linooln — 
Cuming — 
Gage 



Length 
of rec- 
orders 



Total. 



4.12 
3-25 
0.30 

i-95 
2.90 



1.44 



1.06 
3-24 
1. 10 
3-3° 
0.60 
T. 
2.26 
1.20 
1.85 
1-25 
0.64 
4.19 
0.46 
0.25 
0.62 
0.80 
1-25 
4-5 6 



2.35 
0.91 
0.40 
1.28 
0.97 
11-53 
1.49 
2.13 
1.83 
0.27 
2.78 
0.80 
0.80 
2.52 
2.83 

2-35 
0.00 
2.81 
1-55 
1.60 



1.78 
4-35 



Depart- 
ure from 
normal. 



+0.82 



— 0. 11 
+0.16 



— 0.9S 
—2.37 
+6.33 



—'•52 
—2.87 
-0.3S 
—3.66 



+0.82 



No. 
rainy 
days. 



Observers. 



A. H. Gale. 

E.F.Stouffer. 

R.B. Brabham. 

.1. A.Kinscy. 

C.M.Heinlv. 

E.J. Couch. 

Mrs.L.A.Wibley. 

W.J.Melson. 

M.H.Smith. 

D.J.Wood. 

S.M.Wellman. 

G.H.Benson. 

M. L.Jones. 

G.H.Borden. 

Amos Burwell. 

T.P.F. Haine. 

R.C'.Orr. 

N.J.Kuhlman. 

T.W.Lyman. 

D. W. Alspaugh. 

N.R.Kellam. 

F.S.Morris. 

John Ellis. 

F. Hussong. 
Wm. Webster. 
R.J. Duff. 
O.P.Billings. 
J. F.Barnes, 
•las. Milford. 

G. W.Murharger. 
Wm.Ough. 
W.S.Green. 
W.Z.Pickett. 
W.l.Meader. 
W.W.McDermet. 
J.S.Spooner. 
L.N. Dickinson. 
Weather Bureau. 
J.W.Gray. 
S.Diller. 
C.W.Shurtliff. 
L.Howell. 
S.H.Dopp. 
W.J.Craven. 
J.W.Hann. 
S.E.Davis. 
Wesley W.Lewis. 
N.C. Sears. 
L.S.Sage. 
Weather Bureau. 



July, 1898. 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



Climatological data for Nebraska, July, 1898. 



Stations. 



NORTHEASTERN SEC. 

Agee * 

Blair 

Columbus 

Creighton 

Fremont 

Hartington 

Lynch* 

Madison 

Norfolk 

Oakdale 

Omaha 

O'Neill 

Santee Agency 

Stanton * 

Tekamah 

Wakefield 

Westpoint 

Southeastern Sec. 

Arborville* 

Ashland 

Aulmrn * 

Aurora* 

Beatrice 

Crete 

David City 

Dawson * 

Edgar * 

Fairbury 

Geneva 

Harvard 

Hebron 

Lincoln , 

Nebraska City 

Odell* 

Kulo * 

Seward * 

Superior* 

Tecumseh 

Turlington 

VVeepingwater * 

York* 

Central Sec 

Albion 

Ansley 

Ashton* 

Broken bow* 

Burvvell* 

Callaway 

Central City * 

Dunning* 

F.ricson * 

Genoa 

Gothenburg 

Grand Island 

Greeley * 

Kearney * 

Lexington 

Loup* 

North Loup 

Kavenna 

St. Paul* 

Southwestern Sec. 

Alma* . ..^ 

Arapahoe* 

Beaver City 

Benkelman* 

Bluehill* 

Curtis 

Franklin 

Hastings* 

Holdrege* 

Imperial 

McCook* 

.Madrid* , 

Miiuleu 

Redeloud * 

Republican* 

Wilsonville 

Western Skc. 

Camp Clarke 

Gering 

Kimball 

Lodgepole 

Nesbit 

North Platte 

Seneca* 

Thedford* 

Whitman* 

Northwestern Sec. 

Alliance * 

Fort Robinson 

Hay Springs , 

Kennedy 

Kirkwood * 

Springview 

Valentine 



Counties. 



Holt 

Washington. 

Platte 

Knox 

Dodge 

Cedar 

Boyd 

Madison 

...do 

Antelope 

Douglas 

Holt 

Knox 

Stanton 

Burt 

Dixon 

Cuming 



York 

Saunders 

Nemaha 

Hamilton ... 

Cage 

Saline 

Butler 

Richardson . 

Clay 

Jefferson 

Fillmore 

Clay 

Thayer 

Lancaster. .. 

Otoe 

Gage 

Richardson . 

Seward 

Nuckolls 

Johnson 

Otoe 

Cass 

York 



Boone — 
Custer . . , 
Sherman , 
Custer . . . 
Garfield 
Caster . . , 
Merrick ., 
Blaine — 
Wheeler. 
Platte.... 
Dawson . . 

Hall 

Greelev • 
Buffalo... 
Dawson . , 
Sherman . 
Valley . . . 
Buffalo.., 
Howard.. 



Harlan 

Furnas 

...do 

Dundy 

Webster 

Frontier 

Franklin 

Adams 

Phelps 

Chase 

Red Willow. 

Perkins 

Kearney 

Webster 

Harlan 

Furnas 



Chevenne ... 
Scotts Bluff. 

Kimball 

Cheyenne ... 

Logan 

Lincoln 

Thomas 

...do 

Grant 



Box Butte . 

Dawes 

Sheridan . . . 

Cherry 

Rock 

Keya Paha . 
Cherrv 



,442 
,600 
,203 
1 3°9 



,585 
,532 
1 722 
i°3 
,975 



472 
060 

3<3 



, 100 
,051 
,792 
- 2 35 
,36S 
,619 

945 
,722 
,3'6 
, 6 33 
,812 
,458 
,■99 

941 
,278 

842 
,435 
,574 
,"3 
,214 
,080 
,642 

1,747 
2,307 
2,061 
2,477 
2,180 

2,555 
1,708 
2,621 
2,029 
•,584 
2,557 
1,860 
2,010 
2, 146 
2,385 
2,067 
1,961 
2,028 
1.796 

1,939 
2,173 
2,147 
2,968 
1,967 
2,553 
1,820 
1,932 
2,324 
3,278 
2,506 

3,294 
2, 169 
1,687 
i,939 



3,700 



4,697 
3,820 



2,841 

2,971 
2,842 
3,58S 

3,968 
3, 764 
3.821 



2,613 



Temperature, in degrees Fahrenheit. 



73-5 

73-9 

72.0 

73- 8 

74.6 

73-4 

72.5 

72.9 

73. o°> 

74-4 

75-3 

69.9 

76.0 

74.2 

73-9 
72.8 
75-2 

74.6 
76.4 
75- o 
82. 2 



75- o 
74-4 
75-0 
79-4 
75-2 
74-6 
74-4 
76.5 
74-8 
73-9 
76.8 
80.4 
75-4 
76.4 
77.8 
76.8 
71.0 
76.6 

71.9 
72.8 
74.8 
73-o 



76.2 



79.6 
75-3 
75-3 
73-8 



76.3 
71.6 

73-9 
74-5 
74-2 
76.8 

72.5 
76.4 
75-2 
74-9 
77-0 
74-7 



75- o 



75-7 
78.2 
76.4 
74.6 
78.3 
79-7 



72.0 



71.7 
71.2 
71.6 
72.4 
70.8 
70.4 
68.8' 

73-8 
71.8 
70.9 
72.5 
72.4 
74-9 
73-4 



S 



—1.7 



— 0. 1 
—0.6 
—0.3 



—0.5 
+0.8 



-3-6 
-0.6 



— '■5 

— 1. 1 
+3-2 



—o-3 
+ '•7 



—1.8 



-1.0 

-2.4 



-1.7 

-i-5 
-0.6 



-2.0 
-2.4 



—0.8 
— 1.0 



+ 2.6 



+ 1.4 
+0.3 



-0.6 
0.0 



0.0 
-0.6 



+0.4 
—0.8 



-0.3 



—0-3 
—0-3 
—0.9 



+ 0.1 
0.0 



3"+ 



3° 



36 



46 



Precipitation, in inches. 



o >, 



3-0.5 
1.38 
0.82 
2.96 
2.56 
3-84 
4-85 
0.90 
1.60 

2.15 

4.20 
3.87 
6.16 
1-32 
1.99 
2.08 
0.80 

0.46 
1. 18 
3-70 
0.69 
2.38 
1.84 
0.70 
2.30 
o.79 
0.80 
0.35 
0.77 
0.7. 
3-93 
2.65 
1.08 
3.22 
0.92 
1. 15 
1-45 
3-09 
2.92 
0.28 



1. 11 
1.42 
0.88 
2.03 

2-33 
2.60 
0.40 



1. 91 
1.36 
1.48 

1-39 
0.90 
1.76 
1.29 
1-93 
0.99 

2. 19 
1.38 

2.09 

I.85 
I.60 
-'.85 
O.87 
2.56 



0- 55 
1.85 
3-37 
1.68 
0.63 
1.50 
1.63 
1.80 
1.92 

2.13 
1.65 
2.26 
1.60 
2.25 
1.29 
5.00 

5-5° 
2.00 

4-47 
2. 19 
2-74 
3-70 
4.31 
2.14 
2.28 



a 

3; o 



+0.89 



-1.38 
—1.07 
—1.74 
+1.16 
+1.69 
—1.09 
—2.45 

— 1.27 
— 0.42 

+1.85 

+3-5° 
— 2.29 
—1.62 



—3- '9 

—1. 91 
—3-51 
— 1. 16 



— 2.07 
—3-15 
-1.38 



—4.15 
—2.47 
—1-75 
—3-44 
+o-59 
—0.87 



—2.42 

-3-78 
-2.85 
— 0.04 

—1.05 
-3.61 



-1.06 
-2.40 



-2.68 
-0.79 



-2.58 
-1.94 



—0.87 
+ 1.15 



-o. 56 
-3-5i 
-2.04 



— 0. 30 
—0.26 



+ 0.37 
—1-3" 



+ 2-55 
— o-53 

+ 2. II 

+ 0.22 

+0-43 

+1.20 



+0.18 

— 0.76 



1.05 
• 52 

0-37 
0.90 
1.25 
1.03 
1-43 
0-47 
0.57 
0.95 
3-55 
2.00 
2.62 
0.58 
0.65 
0.52 
o. 44 

0.40 
0.36 
1.09 

o.45 
0.90 
1.42 
0.40 
0-73 
0.43 
0-59 
o. 14 
0.31 
0.36 
3-52 
1.06 
0.88 
1. 10 
0.49 
0.80 
0.70 
1.20 
2.24 
0.28 

0-54 
0.77 
0.30 
1.26 
1.40 

2.35 
0.40 



1. 01 

0.83 

1. 10 

°-95 
0.35 
0.80 

0.47 
o.93 
0.42 
1. 10 
0.63 

0.96 
0.85 
0.92 
1.65 
0.37 
1-15 



0.40 
1.60 
i-55 
0.50 

o.33 
0.66 
0.65 
1.05 
0-95 

0. S3 

0.60 
0.S1 
0.60 
o-75 
o-54 
2.50 
1.70 
1.90 

1.49 
0.65 
1. 10 
1.06 
1.94 
0.65 



II 



Sky. 



E 



S 



5 

7 
4 
5 
4 
5 
6 



"■a 

1° 



■o-e 



Js-e 



se. 

se. 

se. 

sw. 

nw. 

se. 

nw. 

se. 



se. 
se. 
se. 



se. 
se. 



sw. 
se. 



se. 
se. 

s. 



se. 

nw. 

ne. 



Observers. 



R.E.Bowden. 

E. A. Palmer. 
C.C.Gray. 

Dr. Geo. Roberts. 

Wm. J. Phillips. 

T. B.A.Watson. 

C.C.Irwin. 

Dr. F.A.Long. 

Dr. P. II. Salter. 

6. S. Clingman. 

U. S. Weather Bureau. 

O.M.Collins. 

W.H.Hamlin. 

W.Gerecke. 

Dr. A. D. Nesbit. 

I. H. Weaver. 

C.J.Kadish. 

E.D. Smith. 

Dr.A.S. v Mansfelde. 

G.D.Carrington. 

H.C.Miller. 

C.Kellam. 

Doane College. 

E.B.Taylor. 

M.L.Libbee. 

J. W. Hoberg. 

Herman Conerus. 

F.M.Flory. 

Dr. J. T.Fleming. 

Dr. CM. East on. 

U. S. Weather Bureau. 

E.Morton. 

W.F.Denton. 

W.F.Gingrich. 

L.E.Ost. 

J. H. Harrington. 

CM. Miller. 

Wm.N. Hunter. 

G. Treat. 

O.P. Lowry. 

F.A.Pettinger. 
Chas.R.Hare. 

F. Rein. 
H.L.Ormsby. 
W.S.Green. 
Geo.B. Mair. 
J.A.McRae. 
E.E.Bole.iack. 
A.Dahl. 

Geo. S.Truman. 

A. V.Carlson. 

E.Corbin. 

J. A.Pinkerton. 

C.E.Magner. 

Ira P.Griswold. 

E.S.Hayhurst. 

J.E.Goodrich. 

Erastus Smith. 

Paul Anderson. 

R.E. Pitcher. 
J F.Edwards. 
C.G.George. 
W. E. Winger. 
C.S. Draper. 
Dr. S.R. Razee. 
F.T.Owen. 
J. C.S warts. 
C. Engstrom. 
Robert Malcolm. 
C.T.Watson. 
John McKenzie. 
Joel Hull. 
W.K.Hayes. 
W. Bunion. 
D.M. Knapp. 

Robt. H.Willis. 

J. P. Finley. 

F.J. Bellows. 

A.B.Persinger. 

G.E.Bolkrom. 

U. S. Weather Bureau. 

D.McNall. 

O.G.Norton. 

J.L.Crossley. 

J.W.Wollick. 
Post surgeon. 

C. A. Waterman. 

D. A.Piercy. 
Mrs.C. A.Arter. 
Miss Ezada Phelps. 
C.T.Watson. 



* Temperature data from thermometers not self registering t Occurred on more than one day. •, '', c . etc., indicate number of days missing from observed readings. 
All records are use! in determining State or district means, but State and district departures are determined by comparison of current data of only stations with normal. 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



July, 1898. 



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CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



July, 1898. 



Daily precipitation for Nebraska, July, 1898. 





Day of month. 




Stations. 


i. 


2. 


3- 


4- 


5- 


6. 


7- 


8. 


9- 


10. 


11. 


12. 


'3- 


14. 


15- 


16. 


17- 


18. 


19- 


20. 


21. 


22. 


23- 


24. 


25- 


26. 

t 
.09 


27. 


28. 


29. 

.67 
.20 


3°. 

'.'96 

•42 
t 
.06 

•■5 


31. 

. 11 
.06 
•5° 

.06 







I.OO 


■•°5 










•°5 


1.50 


■'7 

.02 

t 


































3-°5 












•°3 
1.49 


















■°5 










■ 14 




























4-47 
1.42 
1.85 
0.46 
1. 18 






•77 
.80 
.40 










.02 


















.06 










■'5 




















.20 




















































t 
■°5 


































t 
.36 


.04 
1.09 






• 05 






.28 
•83 

t 


■34 








t 
















t 




















.64 
•45 














•58 














.56 


3-70 
0.69 
















•09 














t 
















t 
















































.92 

•65 






•45 
'■65 

••5 


'+' 


I 
•15 

•'7 


1 

'V 






















t 










•19 












t 

.12 
•05 
■•5 
. 11 

t 


.04 
•42 


1.60 






• 27 




.28 






































2.85 






• °3 




•33 
















.01 
















t 


■52 


1.38 






•37 
[.26 
1.40 








t 






t 
.08 

.04 








.20 








0.87 












.06 


. 10 
•59 




































. 10 












































.07 


■■3 






2-35 








t 




■25 
































































































■35 








t 

■15 
•°3 


•°9 




t 




. 10 


























t 








•37 
.85 


.... 


.90 


0.82 






.70 
.29 
•57 
i- '5 
•3° 
















• 14 


.01 














. 12 




.01 








.02 




•5' 


1.42 

• 77 




.04 
. 10 














•°3 














1.84 


Culbertson 


.29 




























t 
t 


































. 12 
















.IS 


• 34 

t 






t 




t 


t 




















t 
















.40 
























































.06 

■45 
•59 

t 


•43 




'.'06 


.20 

•'5 
t 




































t 












t 


. 10 






■15 








•30 


















t 
t 


















1. 01 


1-9' 

0.80 
















































t 
•3° 














t 




























t 




• °5 










. 12 
• 72 


•77 




.02 


• 65 

• 36 
































•55 


•50 








1.00 


•3° 








•°5 




















•39 












3-59 






.26 
. 12 
.09 




■•25 
t 






t 












.08 


















•92 


•05 


•05 
t 




.14 


•74 




.04 


















f 














t 




















.02 


































•5> 

t 
+ 


1.36 














.16 






•5° 


•39 






























t 


.60 

.36 
.20 


.08 


1.65 




1. 10 


.01 
•95 
•°5 
•°5 

■3' 
.40 








.01 






































1.48 
















•13 
•35 
.02 
.08 


















• °3 


























•35 
•50 














































•'5 

t 


















•58 




















t 
■°3 
















1.03 


•54 


•31 

. 11 

•3° 
1. 10 


.81 

•"5 


3-84 
0.77 










.14 
t 




























•°5 






































t 








t 










o-55 




.78 
• °3 






■52 






•25 

•65 


'.'78 


t 












t 












t 


1.85 












t 


.06 




. 12 






























2-74 




.36 








•3° 
.80 
































•05 


0.71 




•45 






+ 
















































1.60 
• 09 

.80 
.08 




















































•25 
•23 
•15 
.04 
.40 
•49 
■47 
.06 

.26 
.20 


'.'46 
.28 

.02 

•71 
• 14 
.04 


1. 8s 




1-55 






t 






t 


1.22 


.08 






















.20 


t 


t 


■35 


t 










3-37 
1.76 














































•31 
.81 
.66 

•09 

.60 


•45 


1.06 




















•45 

t 






.18 


•25 


■15 






.70 


3-7° 
2.26 




■°5 
















•75 
















1.94 
•43 
•15 










■ 24 


.16 












.06 








. 10 














.66 


4.31 








































■30 












.01 






•5' 


3. 01 

t 


t 
.40 


t 

•25 
•17 


t 
















■17 














t 




t 
•35 


3-93 




t 




















t 












•93 

1. 01 

.21 

•47 


































•57 














.86 










1.43 




.10 


t 




















.02 














•52 

•34 


4.85 
0.46 










t 


















































t 

•33 
. 10 
•°5 
•°9 




























.02 




.02 




.01 


















•30 




























0.63 
1 68 






•50 
•33 

.6b 
.46 


.41 
.06 




•32 






.28 






























.07 






























• 05 




.01 
t 

•5° 
■34 










.01 
•3° 






.02 




•07 

•37 
•05 


.02 
.02 


0.62 








.06 


1.06 
.60 


t 


























.02 




































■ 45 
.82 


1.64 


.11 


2.65 
4-50 
2.25 














































1. 16 






•75 










•43 




•37 




















■05 












•65 

•25 

.07 


■45 

•54 
•3° 




•17 

.42 

•52 
•95 
.88 
.02 


.29 


























■°5 
t 

.04 
.20 










•07 








■57 




t 

t 












•27 
. 10 
■07 


























•°5 






t 




North Platte 














.02 
















































.06 














•°3 




.02 


•52 














.20 
3-55 


































1 08 






.01 






.01 


•■7 




t 




• H 














t 
















t 
.88 


t 


■ 42 

t 


•59 

t 


•05 

"V 

■'5 


4.20 
3.87 


O'Neill 


2.00 






















•23 








.40 

•35 
.18 
.48 




















































.48 




•3° 










































I 28 






.62 








•17 
.16 










































0.97 




t 












t 


















.02 










1. 10 
•55 












•43 


"t 




•43 






•65 
1.05 
1. 10 








































1.63 






•75 
•78 
•63 


















































































•30 
.04 
















■42 


.62 








3.22 
1.38 
2.13 
6 16 












.22 


























•3' 




.04 




.14 

•55 
• 14 

.70 
•09 

•47 

.10 


•25 






•85 








.80 






















.20 










. 10 


.18 

.70 






1.22 
1-59 

•05 








2.62 


•03 




















.07 
•°3 










t 




•97 
































.07 












1.83 
0.27 
5.00 
0.92 
2.14 
1-32 
0.80 














•07 
.90 








































•'5 




.90 
.18 












2.50 










































.16 
1-3° 
■58 
•3° 
■'5 








•49 






















































•35 




•54 


































•65 

t 


•49 










































t 




t 














•25 
.80 


























•■5 














.20 


















































1.15 

1-45 
1.99 
3-<9 
2.28 




•25 


• 25 


























. 10 
















.70 
•03 


•■5 
. 11 
.06 
•75 
.41 
.01 
• 44 


•25 
.04 
.12 

.18 
.02 

. 10 


•°5 

t 

.08 
.26 
.02 

t 

.10 




•35 
.29 
.06 
•52 
.12 
■34 








.40 
•45 








. 10 

t 


■ 55 














•15 
•99 
































.06 
1. [I 


























t 
t 
•33 


1.20 




.02 








.02 
.02 
•5° 


.02 


t 


















. 10 




t 


t 
.02 




























.29 


•°5 




2.08 












2.24 






.01 
























2.92 
0.80 












.02 


























t 








t 
















1.90 




































Wilher 




t 
•95 






•65 

■45 


























.11 


















.69 




1-55 
1.92 
0.28 








•35 






















.07 










.10 








York 












































■25 


•03 



























































t Trace (when precipitation is less than 0.01 of an inch). 



^JJUKm 3Hi JO 

V' ^ U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. 



REPORT FOR AUGUST. 1898. 



NEBRASKA SECTION 



OF THE 



CLIMATE AND CROP SERVICE 



OF THE 



WEATHER BUREAU. 



PUBLISHED BY AUTHORITY OF THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE. 



UNDER DIRECTION OF 

WILLIS L. MOORE 

CHIEF OP WEATHER BUREAU 
WY 

G. A. LOVEhAND, 

SECTION DIRECTOR, 

Office, University o? Nebraska, bincolp. 




CO 
OS 

co 



r- 
X 





x 

P 

5Z5 



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> 

32 



55 

< 

X 

b 

X 

— « 



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-~0 



August, 1898. 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OK AGRICULTURE, 

Climate and Crop Service 

OK THE 

WEATHER BUREAU. 

CENTRAL OFFICE: WASHINGTON, D. C. 



NEBRASKA SECTION, 
G. A. LOVELAND, Section Director, 

LINCOLN", NEBR. 



Vol. III. 



LINCOLN, NEBR. 



No. 8. 



POSSIBILITIES OF IRRIGATION, USING WATER PUMPED 

BY WINDMILLS, STORED IN RESERVOIRS, AND 

APPLIED DURING PERIODS OF DROUGHT. 

The money value to the corn grower in Nebraska of a sup- 
ply of water available to supplement the rainfall during the 
critical month of July is illustrated again this year. With 
sufficient rainfall from planting to the middle of July, and 
an ample supply of moisture after August 1 to mature the 
crop, it is seriously injured in a large portion of the State 
by the lack of sufficient rainfall during the last half of July. 
Probably two inches of water during this period would have 
assured a large crop. 

The practicability of profitable irrigation for corn, even 
where only one application is required, as is the case in Ne- 
braska in dry years, is generally doubted. But no test has 
ever been made of this supplemental irrigation to determine 
either the cost of the application of water or the value to 
the crop in increasing the yield, and its practicability is a 
matter of conjecture. The Agricultural Experiment Sta- 
tions of Colorado and Wisconsin are experimenting along 
lines which furnish facts which aid in forming an intelligent 
opinion of the practicability of irrigation where storage of 
water is necessary and the water is to be obtained by pump- 
ing from wells, using windmills for the power. These are 
the conditions that seem to be the controlling factors in 
supplemental irrigation in most of the semi-humid portions 
of the Plains Region. The supply of water is generally con- 
ceded ample if it can be raised to the surface and thus made 
available. 

In Bulletin No. 68 of the Wisconsin Agricultural Station, 
entitled, "One Year's Work Done by a 16-Foot Geared Wind- 
mill," Prof. F. H. King presents, as he says — 

The first complete and careful record of a full year's work done by 
any windmill where both the work done and the wind movement have 
been automatically recorded hour by hour for a whole year. The want 
of accurate data such as is here presented has long been felt, and in 
view of this fact great pains has been taken to so arrange and present 
the data that they will be easily accessible to both practical and scien- 
tific men. The variable and unsteady force of the wind has always 
been the most serious hindrance to the use of the windmill as a motive 
power, and so, in order that the real character and magnitude of this 
variability in terms of work may be seen for all hours of the day and 
for all days of the year, the records of the whole year have been 
brought into a table in such a way that a simple inspection will show 
just what this windmill was able to do on any hour or day or succes- 



sion of days throughout the year. The table shows just how frequently 
and during how long intervals the windmill was able to do no work: 
it shows when and how consecutively it could do heavy work; and it 
shows how persistently a moderate amount of work could be done by 
it. These are the essential facts which the practical man needs to 
know, and they are in the form which is most readily accessible to him. 

The experiment consisted essentially in starting a 16-foot 
geared windmill to pumping water at noon on March 6, 
1897, and continuing the pumping practically without inter- 
ruption until noon, March 6, 1898. The water was pumped 
into a measuring tank, which was automatically emptied 
when full by means of a siphon, and the record of the num- 
ber of times the tank was emptied was secured by means of 
a pen carried by a float and recording on a chronograph. A 
self-recording anemometer of the Robinson type, with its 
axis on a level with the windmill, recorded the number of 
miles of wind influencing the mill. Tables are published 
showing the wind velocity and the amount of water pumped 
for each hour of each day of the year, thus giving in detail 
the results of the experiment. The water was lifted only 10 
feet. During three hundred and sixty-five days the amount 
of water pumped was 24,433 tanks, each holding 141.2 cubit 
feet, or sufficient to cover 79.1 acres 12 inches deep. 

Professor King also gives a table of the amount of water 
pumped by ten-day periods, and from this table summarizes 
results as follows : 

The chief difficulty regarding the windmill as a motor is the great 
variability of the wind velocity, which makes it necessary in the case 
of irrigation by pumping to provide storage for the water pumped, so 
that it may be used in times of insufficient wind if needed. As irriga- 
tion may often be desirable at intervals of once in ten days, the work 
done in pumping by the windmill has been condensed into consecutive 
ten-day periods. The smallest amount of water lifted 10 feet high in 
ten days was enough to cover 9.87 acres 1 inch deep, and this occurred 
from July 28 to August 7 — at the time when water for irrigation is 
most needed. The largest amount pumped occurred during the ten 
days from February 13 to 23, and was enough to cover 75.73 acres 1 
inch deep. The mean amount of water pumped during the one hun- 
dred days from May 29 to September 6 was 24.549 acre-inches per ten 
days, and as this is the season when the water is most needed in the 
United States it shows about what the capacity of such a plant is for 
irrigating purposes where the lift is 10 feet. With a lift of 20 feet the 
capacity would be a little less than one-half of this amount. That 
is to say, 10 inches of water can be given to 24.5 acres of ground during 
one hundred days where the lift is 10 feet and 12.25 acres where the 
lift is 20 feet; and 20 inches of water could be. given to one-half of 
these areas respectively. 

This gives some real data regarding the amount of water 
that can be pumped by a windmill. Next month some ex- 
tracts will be given from the bulletin of the Colorado Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station, on "The Loss of Water by 
Seepage and Evaporation." 



CROP CONDITIONS. 

The first week of the month was marked by heavy, general 
rains throughout the State, which relieved all drought con- 
ditions. The week was exceedingly favorable for growing 
crops, but retarded stacking, thrashing, and haymaking. 
These rains were beneficial to corn in northern counties, but 
in most central and southern counties the crop had suffered 
considerable permanent injury from the July drought and 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



August, 1898. 



was not materially improved by these rains. The last three 
weeks of the month were dry and the last two weeks exceed- 
ingly hot. The ground was moist and in excellent condition 
for plowing during the second and third weeks of the month 
and a large amount of plowing was done. During the last 
week little plowing was done as the ground was too dry to 
work to advantage. Very little fall grain had been sown at 
the end of the month because of the dry weather the latter 
part of August. Corn matured very rapidly during the last 
half of the month, and during the last few days was dam- 
aged considerably by the high temperature and lack of 
moisture in the soil. 



COMPARISON OF PAST AUGUSTS. 



The monthly maximum and mini 
tions have been obtained for the ye 
table has been revised, and differs s 
previously published : 

^Temperature.^ 
Mean. Max. Min 



1876 . 

1877 . 

1878 . 

1879 ■ 



1883 . 

1884 , 
1885. 

1886 . 

1887 . 



73-5 
72.8 
74-4 
72.9 
73-2 
78.8 
73-4 
71-3 
70.3 
69.8 
75-4 
70.9 
70.2 



97 
102 

>°3 
100 
102 
102 
106 
102 
97 
96 
108 
104 
■°3 



5> 
46 
34 
52 
42 
40 
42 
38 
35 
3° 
34 



Prec. 

3- 2 5 
2.04 
2.16 
1-54 
3-87 
1.18 

I-3I 

3.21 
2-97 
3-96 
3.22 
4.13 
3-H 



mum temperatures for several sta- 
ars 1876 to 1888, and the following 
ightly from the comparative tables 

^—Temperature.-^ 
Mean. Max. Min. Prec. 



1893. 
1894. 
1895. 
1896. 
1897. 



Average for the 
State for past 



23 years . 



72.9 

7i-7 
70.6 
73-2 
7°-3 
75-8 
73-0 
73-3 
70.8 
74.2 



74-0 



i°5 
108 
106 
113 
no 
108 
106 
107 
107 
109 



40 
34 
3° 
3° 
35 
36 
39 
34 
37 
42 



2.40 
2.24 
2.92 
3.20 

2.33 
0.74 
3-°4 
1. 81 
2.60 
2.24 



CLIMATOLOGY OF THE MONTH. 

General characteristics: The month was characterized by 
heavy rain the first week and hot, dry weather the last two 
weeks. The daily maximum temperature exceeded 90° at 
most stations nearly every day for the last two weeks of the 
month, and on several days it exceeded 100° at many sta- 
tions. The rainfall was below the normal, except in small 
areas in the central and northeastern sections, where the 
excess ranged from one to four inches. The excess was 
greatest in southwestern Custer, southeastern Holt, and 
southern Fillmore counties. The deficiency along the 
southeastern and southern borders of the State ranged 
from one to three inches. The greatest deficiency w r as in 
Nemaha County. 

Atmospheric pressure: The mean pressure was 29.92 inches, 
which is 0.04 of an inch below the normal for August. The 
highest during the month was 30.12 inches, at Omaha on 
the 12th, and the lowest, 29.62 inches, at Lincoln and Ash- 
land on the 22d. 

Temperature: The mean temperature for the State was 
74.2°, as determined from the records of 96 stations, which 
is about the normal. The highest temperature was 109°, at 
Camp Clarke on the 21st, and the lowest, 42°, at Lodgepole 
on the 9th. 

Wind: The prevailing direction of the wind was from the 
south. The average velocity was 7.4 miles an hour, which 
is about the normal. The highest velocity was 88 miles an 
hour, at Lincoln on the 15th, from the northwest. 

Precipitation: The average precipitation for the State was 
2.24 inches, as determined from the records of 183 stations, 
wiiich is about one-third of an inch below the normal. The 



largest precipitation reported at any one station was 6.85 
inches, at Callaway, and the least, none, at Lodgepole. The 
precipitation for the first eight months of the year was 90 
per cent of the normal, and for the six months of the crop 
season (March, April, May, June, July, and August) it was 
( .)() per cent of the normal. 

Hail: Hail fell on the 12th, 15th, 16th, and 25th. 

Thunderstorms: Thunderstorms occurred on the 1st, 2d, 
4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, 12th, 13th, 15th, 16th, 17th, 18th, 22d, 
23d, 25th, and 26th. 

Wind and humidity table. 



Stations. 



Lincoln 

North Platte 
Omaha 



Wind. 



Miles. Mean. Max. Dir. Date 



6,678 
6,025 
5,065 



9.0 
8.1 
6.8 



Humidity. 



Mean. 



68.1 
66.1 
66.4 



Low- 



Date. 



3° 
30 



Means for the six equal sections of the State. 



Sections. 



Southeastern . , 
Northeastern. , 

Central 

Southwestern . 

Western 

Northwestern 

State 



Temperature. 



Mean. 



76.6 
73-o 
74-7 
76.5 
72-3 
72.2 

74.2 



Aver- 



73-9 
72. 2 
72.8 
74.o 
71.5 
70.6 

72.5 



Precipitation. 



Mean . 



2.20 
2.85 
2.85 
2.41 
1. 61 
1-55 
2.24 



Aver- 
age. t 



3-43 
3-13 
2.45 
2.82 

2.21 

1.66 
2.62 



Number of days- 



Rainy. Clear. JW Cloudy. 



20.2 

2'-5 
18.0 

19-7 



9-3 
9.2 
6.9 

8.8 
6.4 



1.6 
3-5 
3-3 
1. 2 
3-' 
2.8 

2.6 



* For ten years. t For twenty years. 

Supplemental precipitation table. 



Stations. 



Bartley 

Bassett 

Bellevue 

Benedict 

Burchard 

Cody 

Cornlea 

C'ulbertson 

Divide 

Eden 

Elba 

Ewing 

Fairfield 

Fairmont 

Gordon 

Haigler 

Hayes Center. . . 

Hickman 

Hooper 

Johnstown 

Lyons 

McCool Junct. . . 

Marquette 

Merriman 

Monroe 

Nemaha 

Norman 

Ord 

Osceola 

Ough 

Palmer 

Plattsmouth — 

St.Libory 

Salem 

Sargent 

Schuyler 

Sioux City, Iowa 

Spragg 

Stockham 

Strang 

Stratton 

Syracuse 

Table Hock 

Valparaiso 

Wauneta 

Wilber 

Willard 

Wisner 

Wymore 

Yankton, S. Dak 



Counties. 



Red Willow 

Rock 

Sarpy 

York 

Pawnee — 

Cherry 

Platte 

Hitchcock . 
Sherman . . . 
Nemaha ... 
Howard — 

Holt 

Clay 

Fillmore .. . 
Sheridan. . . 

Dundy 

Hayes 

Lancaster . 

Dodge 

Brown 

Burt 

York 

Hamilton .. 

Cherry 

Platte 

Nemaha . .. 
Kearney . . . 

Valley 

Polk 

Dundy 

Merrick 

Cass 

Howard . . . 
Richardson 

Custer 

Colfax 



Rock 

Hamilton . 
Fillmore . . 
Hitchcock 

Otoe 

Pawnee ... 
Saunders.. 

Chase 

Saline 

Lincoln . . . 
Cuming ... 
Gage 



Length 
of rec- 
orders 



Total. 



3-40 
1.49 
2.20 
0.96 

1-55 

0.80 



1-34 
2.70 
2.16 



5-93 
3-12 
4.20 
0.60 
1-75 
1.24 

2- "5 

2.70 
1. 71 
4-45 
3.85 
1.74 

2.00 
2.85 
0.53 

3-87 
2.04 
2.85 
1.92 
3-65 
1.30 
1-47 
■•37 
3-50 
3-72 
3-io 
3-30 
4.90 
5-25 
0.71 
2.06 
1.65 
1-54 
1. 14 
4.01 

3-46 

1.70 
2.07 



Depart 
ure from 
normal 



—1.82 
— 2.20 



+3-79 



— 0.04 

+ 1.20 
—2.35 



+ 0-55 

+ 0.66 
+0.30 



+ 0.86 



No. 
rainy 
days. 



Observers. 



R.S.Baker. 

A. H. Gale. 

E.F.Stouffer. 

R.B. Brabham. 

J. A. Kinsey. 

C.M.Heinly. 

E.J. Couch. 

Mrs.L.A. Wibley. 

M.H.Smith. 

D.J.Wood. 

S. M. Wellman. 

G.H.Benson. 

M. L.Jones. 

G.H.Borden. 

Amos Burwell. 

T.P.F.Haine. 

R.C.Orr. 

N.J. Kuhlman. 

T.W.Lyman. 

D.W.Alspaugh. 

N.R.Kellam. 

F.S. Morris. 

John Ellis. 

F. Hussong. 
Win. Webster. 
R.J. Duff. 

J. F.Barnes. 
Jas. Milford. 

G. W. Murbarger. 
Wm.Ough. 
E.H.Smith. 
W.Z.Pickett. 
W.I.Meader. 
W.W.McDermet. 
J.S.Spooner. 
L.N.Dickinson. 
Weather Bureau. 
s.w. Spragg. 
J.W.Gray. 
S.Diller. 
C.W.Shurtliff. 
L.Howell. 
S.H.Dopp. 

W. J.Craven. 
J.W.Hann. 
S.E.Davis. 
Wesley W.Lewis. 
N.C. Sears. 
L.S.Sage. 
Weather Bureau. 



August, 1898. 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



Climatological data for Nebraska, August, 1898. 



Stations. 



NORTHEASTERN SEC. 

Agee * 

Blair 

Columbus 

Creighton 

Fremont 

Hartington 

Lynch* 

Madison 

Norfolk 

Oakdale 

Omaha 

O'Neill 

Santee Agency 

Stanton* 

Tekamah 

Wakefield 

Westpoint 

Southeastern Sec. 

Arborville* 

Ashland 

Auburn * 

Aurora * 

Beatrice 

Crete 

David City 

Dawson * 

Edgar * 

Fairbury 

Geneva 

Harvard 

Hebron 

Lincoln 

Nebraska City 

Odell* 

Rulo* 

Seward * 

Superior* , 

Tecumseh 

Turlington 

Weepingwater* 

York* 

Central Sec 

Albion 

Ansley 

Ashton* 

Broken bow * 

Burwell* 

Callaway 

Central City* 

Dunning* 

Ericson * 

Genoa 

Gothenburg 

Grand Island 

Greeley * 

Kearney * 

Lexington 

Loup* 

North Loup 

Ravenna 

St. Paul * 

Southwestern Sec 

Alma* 

Arapahoe* 

Beaver City 

Benkelman* 

Bluehill* 

Curtis 

Franklin 

Hastings* 

Holdrege * 

Imperial 

MeCook * 

Madrid* 

Minden 

Redcloud * 

Republican * 

Wilsonville 

Western Sec 

Camp Clarke 

Gering 

Kimball 

Lodgepole 

Nesbit 

North Platte 

Seneca* 

Thedford* 

Whitman* 

Northwestern Sec 

Alliance * 

Fort Robinson 

Hay Springs 

Kennedy 

Kirkwood * 

Springview 

Valentine 



Counties. 



Holt 

Washington. 

Platte 

Knox 

Dodge 

Cedar 

Boyd 

Madison — 

...do 

Antelope 

Douglas 

Holt 

Knox 

Stanton 

Burt 

Dixon 

Cuming 



York 

Saunders 

Nemaha 

Hamilton .. 

Gage 

Saline 

Butler 

Richardson 

Clay 

Jefferson 

Fillmore 

Clay 

Thayer 

Lancaster.. 

Otoe 

Gage 

Richardson 

Seward 

Nuckolls 

Johnson 

Otoe 

Cass 

York 



Boone 

Custer . . . 
Sherman . 
Custer .. . 
Garfield .. 
Custer . . . 
Merrick .. 

Blaine 

Wheeler.. 
Platte.... 
Dawson .. 

Hall 

Greeley .. 
Buffalo... 
Dawson . . 
Sherman . 
Valley . .. 
Buffalo... 
Howard.. 



Harlan 

Furnas 

...do 

Dundy 

Webster 

Frontier 

Franklin 

Adams 

Phelps 

Chase 

Red Willow. 

Perkins 

Kearney 

Webster 

Harlan 

Furnas 



Cheyenne . . . 
Scotts Bluff. 
Kimball .... 
Cheyenne . . . 

Logan 

Lincoln 

Thomas 

....do 

Grant 



Box Butte . 

Dawes 

Sheridan .. . 

Cherry 

Rock 

Keya Paha . 
Cherry 



,100 
,051 
,792 
,235 
,36S 
,619 

945 
,722 
,316 
,633 
,812 
,458 
.'99 

941 
,278 

842 
,435 
.574 
."3 
,214 
,080 
,642 

1,747 
2.3°7 
2,061 

2,477 
2,180 

2,555 
1,708 
2,621 
2,029 
1,584 
2,557 
1,860 
2,010 
2, 146 
2,385 
2,067 
1,961 
2,028 
1,796 

1,939 
2,173 
2,147 
2,968 
1,967 
2,553 
1,820 
1.932 
2,324 
3,278 
2,506 
3,294 
2, 169 
1,687 
1,939 



3,700 



4,697 
3,820 



2,8(1 

2,971 
2,842 
3,588 

3,968 
3,764 
3,821 



2,613 



Temperature, in degrees Fahrenheit. 



72.1 
73-4 
72.4 
71.2 
72.8 
71.2 
72.0 
73-4 
71.6 
72.8 
76.4 
7°-3 
74- o 
73-6 
73-1 
72.5 
74.0 

76.4 
76.4 
77.6 
79. 7< 
78.4 
76.0 
74.2 
78.2 
71-7 
77-1 
74-7 
74-3 
72.2 
76.4 
77-i 
77-8 
78.6 
76.6 



78.2 
78.2 
73-4 
77-2 

71. o 
73-4 
76.4 
70.6 



75-4 
79-1 



77.2 
75-4 
72.8" 
73,o 
77-6 
77.8 
72.2 
72.8 
74-3 
75-0 
76.2 

76.6 
75-4 



75-4 
76.6 
75-3 
73- o b 
75- S 



80.0 
79.2 
77. 2> 

75-0 
78.2 
77-2 
76.5 

75-8 

72. 9 h 

71.0 

72.9 

71.4 

73-8 

70.1 

70.7 



70.8 
72.8 
72.6 
72.9 
72.6 
72.0 
72.0 



a 

0) H 



—0.7 



+ 0.3 

+ 0.6 
+7-8 



0.0 



+ 2.4 
—0.6 
— 0.2 
+ 2.6 
+ '•5 



+ 2.2 
+ 2.2 
+ 2-5 



+4-9 
+3-5 
+ 5-2 



+0.7 
+0.9 
—1.9 
+2.4 
+3-5 



+ 1.1 
+4.2 



+3-3 
+ 1.6 



+ 1.2 
+3-5 



+4-4 
+ 1.6 



+ 2.1 
— 1.0 



+0.9 



+0.4 
+2.9 



+ 1.0 
+3-1 



+6.1 



+3-4 
+ 2.3 



+ '•3 
+ 0.7 



+ 1.8 



+ 1.8 
+ 2.6 
+4-0 
+ 1.8 



— 0.2 
—2-7 



20+ 



30 



20t 



Precipitation, in inches. 



of, 



2.72 
2.22 
3-86 
3-40 
2.06 
3-°4 
2.03 
1. 61 
2.01 
2.92 
1.98 
2.33 
2.47 

1-3' 

4.60 
1.67 
3-88 

1.99 

2-95 
i-55 
1.84 
2-33 
2.76 
2.80 
0-93 
2.91 
1.46 
4-97 
5-u 
1.76 
3-45 
0.84 
1.50 
0.40 
3-42 
0.87 
'•55 
1.77 
1. 91 
1-39 

'•47 
2. 12 
1.76 
3-55 
4.68 
6.85 
2.30 



3-98 
2.52 
3-47 
1.65 
2-53 
2.51 
2.74 

1-97 
1.72 
3.80 

2-34 
3-17 



0.90 
2.14 
1.67 
0.30 
6.55 
1.86 
0.88 
0.96 
i-5° 
4-23 
0.28 
1-39 
2.61 

1. 01 
0.60 

0-45 
0.00 
3.26 
1.40 
2-55 
3-30 
0.05 

0.20 
0.05 
0.31 
2.31 
1.87 
1. 91 
3.62 






e-S 



-1.28 



+0.94 

+ ■•47 
—'•33 
+ 0.13 
+ 0.74 
— 2.15 
—1.88 
+o.47 
—1.26 
+ 0.16 
+ 0.65 
—1. 16 
+ 1.38 



+0.45 

— 1.04 
— 1. 12 

—3-57 
—0.71 
— 1.64 
—0.49 
— o. 01 
-1.87 



— 1-74 
— 1.60 
+ 2.23 

— r.61 
+o.35 
— 2.46 



+ 0.69 
— 2. 19 

—2.15 

—0.94 
— 1.70 
— 0.64 



-0.02 
-0.23 



+ 2.54 
+4-5° 
+ 0.36 



+ 0.66 
+ 1.18 



+0.S 



+0.16 
+0.28 



—0.36 
— 1.14 



— 3-°9 
+3-27 
—0.43 
—2.03 



—0.28 
+ 0.67 
-2.36 



—0-79 
—0.96 



+ 1.24 
—0.99 



—2.62 

— 1.40 
— 1-44 
— 1.60 

+0.65 



— 0. 17 
+ I-54 






1 -15 

1.27 

3-33 
1.07 

°-95 
2.23 
0.46 
0.40 
1.08 
1.40 
1. 21 

1-25 

0.71 
0.82 
3-25 
0.61 
3-3° 

1.27 
1.70 
1. 12 
1-37 
1-50 
1.63 
2.24 
0-35 
1-53 
0.49 
3-68 
3-17 
0.62 
1.68 
0.38 
0.63 
0.13 
2.00 
0.30 

1.45 
1.04 
1.09 
1. 00 

0.62 
1. 00 
0.87 
1-79 
1.30 
2.50 
1.40 



1-05 
3-25 
1-25 
0.72 

o.75 
1.30 

1-35 
1-43 
0.52 
0.65 
1-95 

i-37 
1-95 



0.65 
1.00 
0-93 
0.30 
4.60 

1-55 
0.60 
0.68 

i-°5 
2.07 
0.28 
0.90 
1.40 

0-34 
0.41 
0.25 
0.00 

1-45 
0.67 
1-25 
1.20 
0.05 

0.20 

0.05 
0.18 
■•57 
0-93 
1 .02 
1.36 



II 
S| 



.§•5 
s 



Sky. 



CD ^ 

S 



1° 



.OX) 

s 



S O 



se. 
se. 
n. 



sw. 
se. 



s. 
sw. 



se. 
nw. 



se. 
sw. 



sw. 

s. 



nw. 

s. 



s. 
ne. 

s. 



sw. 
ne. 



s. 
ne. 



se. 
sw. 

se. 



se. 
se. 



Observers. 



R.E.Bowden. 

E. A. Palmer. 
C.C.Gray. 

Dr. Geo . Roberts. 

Wm. J. Phillips. 

T. B.A.Watson. 

C.C.Irwin. 

Dr. F.A.Long. 

Dr. P. H.Salter. 

G.S.C'lingman. 

U. S. Weather Bureau. 

O.M.Collins. 

W.H.Hamlin. 

W.Gerecke. 

Dr. A. D. Nesbit. 

I. H. Weaver. 

C.J.Kadish. 

E.D.Smith. 

Dr.A.S. vMansfelde. 

G.D.Carrington. 

H.C.Miller. 

C.Kellam. 

Doane College. 

E.B.Taylor. 

M.L.Libbee. 

J.W.Hoberg. 

Herman Conerus. 

F.M.Flory. 

Dr. J. T.Fleming. 

Dr.C.M.Easton. 

U. S. Weather Bureau. 

E.Morton. 

W.F.Denton. 

W.F.Gingrich. 

L.E.Ost. 

J.H.Harrington. 

C.M.Miller. 

Wm.N. Hunter. 

G. Treat. 

O.P.Lowry. 

F. A.Pettinger. 
Chas.R.Hare. 
F. Rein. 
H.L.Ormsby. 
W.S.Green. 
Geo.B.Mair. 
J. A.McRae. 
E.E.Bolejack. 
A.Dahl. 

Geo. S.Truman. 

A.V.Carlson. 

E.Corbin. 

J.A.Pinkerton. 

C.E.Magner. 

IraP.Griswold. 

E.S.Hayhurst. 

J.E.Goodrich. 

Erastus Smith. 

Paul Anderson. 

R.E. Pitcher. 
J F.Edwards. 
C.G.George. 
W.E. Winger. 
C.S. Draper. 
Dr. S.R. Razee. 
F.T.Owen. 
J.C.Swarts. 
C. Engstrom. 
Robert Malcolm. 
C.T.Watson. 
John McKenzie. 
Joel Hull. 
W.K.Hayes. 
W.Burdon. 
D.M. Knapp. 

Robt. H.Willis. 

J.P.Finley. 

F.J. Bellows. 

A.B.Persinger. 

G.E.Bolkrom. 

U. S. Weather Bureau. 

D.McNall. 

O.G.Norton. 

J.L.Crossley. 

J.W.Wollick. 
Post surgeon. 

C. A. Waterman. 

D. A.Piercy. 
Mrs.C. A. Arter. 
Miss Ezada Phelps. 
C.T.Watson. 



* Temperature data from thermometers not self registering t Occurred on more than one day. a , \ ", etc., indicate number of days missing from observed readings. 
All records are used in determining State or district means, but State and district departures are determined by comparison of current data of only stations with normals. 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



August, 1898. 



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CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



August, 1898. 



Daily precipitation for Nebraska, August, 1898. 





Day of month. 






i. 


2. 


3- 


4- 


5- 


6. 


7- 


8. 


9- 


10. 


11. 


12. 


'3- 


14. 


>5- 


16. 


'7- 


18. 


'9- 


20. 


21, 


22. 


23- 


24. 


25- 


26. 


27. 


28. 


29. 


30. 


Si. 


3 





.40 

.14 


.16 
•31 




.16 
.20 


1.15 
.62 












t 








.04 


.22 


.22 


t 
.07 










.29 


















2.72 
1.47 




























. 11 


































































1. 00 




•72 






















t 


'•95 
t 


.08 














•32 
































• '7 
.16 
.02 
































3-17 
1.99 
2.95 
'•55 
1.84 
2-33 






•44 
.81 

•'3 








1.27 
t 
1. 12 
'•37 
1.50 


















. 12 












t 

•°3 
• 23 






















t 


.... 


1.70 


■35 










• °3 
.04 




.04 
.04 

t 








































































• 3* 
.08 
















+ 


. 12 


t 
•52 




























































•23 












































































.65 

.15 
.70 










. 12 
1.27 






















•'3 






























0.90 




.67 


.04 




• 44 
.84 

2.50 
.08 












t 


.06 




1. 00 


t 






t 


t 




t 

.11 
•97 


t 

•°5 
•48 
















Bluehill .. 


















+ 
.09 

. 10 














2.14 
3-55 
4.68 
6.85 




'■79 
1. 3" 

t 




t 
























• 67 


























1 . 29 




















■ 5° 












.14 














2.00 

• 33 


















'•5° 


•5° 

. 10 










•25 














■31 
3-33 
1.07 
1.63 


•°5 
t 










t 

.01 
.02 




. 11 
























•35 
•05 














t 












.02 


• 15 














3-86 
3-4o 
2.75 

1-34 

1.67 




.63 
.42 




.20 


•93 


















.20 








•'5 


•15 
•34 






























•34 












.02 




.01 














.66 








t 
t 












.68 






























• 93 






t 


2.25 










•38 








t 












•'5 


t 


.21 
















.40 




•15 














t 


















































































t 


"68 


•23 




1 -°5 
•49 


'•53 










•05 


.18 






•92 
•55 
•43 
























t 










2.91 
2.68 


























.40 


















.19 














■°5 


•3° 
•35 


































1.46 
4.20 
0.05 
0.30 
2.06 




.40 






2-55 












.80 
















.10 












































•05 






































































.30 


















.87 
t 


.02 




3*68 

3-25 
.06 
• 3° 


•95 


"t 


.18 








.02 
•23 


. 11 








t 






t 








. II 
















.27 

•55 




.61 
.06 

t 

.03 
.40 
























4-97 
3-98 










■4i 
'•25 




•05 










•°5 




















•°5 


.04 










t 

.02 
.10 


t 






.04 




















t 




.70 
























t 


. 12 




•25 












2.52 
3-47 
■•65 
3- °4 
5-II 
6-55 
1.24 
0.31 
1.76 

2-15 

1.83 
0.88 
2-53 
2.31 
0.45 
1.87 
2.51 
3-45 




.72 
■35 
■49 






2.50 


































.04 


•75 
.02 

3-17 


































•■5 












2.23 






















•'3 












•>3 
















.27 






.02 








.67 




• 79 














•'9 

•14 


















•55 


■'3 




4.60 












1.13 


















t 














•74 






t 




t 


•5° 


















t 


















t 


.08 


.18 
.60 
1-25 

.06 














t 








t 


•°5 








t 












*3i 
.42 

i-55 
.60 














■15 


.08 




.38 


.62 
































•°5 




















•0.5 

t 






















• 74 




t 


1.30 
•23 

t 

t 
1-35 










.10 










t 








•°3 
























.12 
.10 






























.24 












•15 
•'7 
















1-57 
•25 
-93 
•73 


.12 


•34 










































Kimball 


• °7 




t 


















.08 

• 7i 
















































•53 
.22 


•34 
.08 






















































t 

t 






•05 
.24 


•05 


.08 
















• 72 






1.68 


•°5 












t 


t 
























































.90 
.40 








i-43 
.42 




















.11 

.14 


.02 














.28 
.09 


















2.74 
2.03 
4-45 
1. 61 
1.50 
0.96 
1.74 
4.23 
0.84 
0-53 
3.26 
2.01 
1.97 
1.40 
2.92 
1.50 
1.98 
2-33 
2 86 




.28 
.89 

.40 




.46 




















•24 






























3-56 

• 75 


















































•25 














t 








.08 


.08 


.02 










•°3 
•45 
.09 
.02 
.26 
.18 
•24 
.22 




















1.05 

.68 












































. 12 


















. 














•03 
•04 


■03 
















•47 






2.07 


.89 










.25 


t 




.63 


.08 
• °5 


t 
.04 

•07 


























.80 












•39 
















. 10 






•38 














.06 




.07 
























.22 
1-45 












































Nesbit .. 












•3' 
















•93 














.11 


•35 














Norfolk 


.61 


.01 


• 14 


•45 


1.08 










•05 






.01 




























■52 
.67 
.48 
. 12 
















•52 

.58 
.28 














•48 
■46 
•3' 
• 47 
















North Platte... 


.0[ 

.08 








.16 












.02 




t 
















• 04 


• 04 
















t 


1.40 
.63 














t 


■07 




















Odell 
















































■59 t 


.08 
.08 


1.21 


.10 










t 


.06 












.02 






















O'Neill 










t 
t 




.10 


t 


1-25 








t 


.20 

t 






















.48 




2.30 












t 
.24 

• 17 














t 
















Ough 


1.60 






















.08 
.10 
























1.92 
3.6 5 
1.72 




.64 








2.22 


















■45 
.01 


.07 

t 






























.65 

.28 
.90 






•52 
















.08 










•'5 




•31 














































































.08 
• 13 
.22 


•3° 




.08 
•°5 
.60 

.01 
.21 




.22 
















.11 














'•39 
0.40 
3.80 
'•37 
2-47 
3-5o 
3-72 
2-55 
3-42 
1. 91 
1-3' 
5- 2 5 
0.87 

'•55 
4.60 

'•77 
3.62 
1.67 
1. 91 
3.88 
0.05 
4.01 
2.61 


Kulo . . . 


. 10 

.40 
.36 






























. 12 
• °3 
















St Paul . . . 


.85 






'■95 














• °7 
■ 32 




.08 




























.20 

•35 




















•15 


















.14 
1.79 




.67 


•36 

'■25 
3.20 












.02 


.01 


.36 










•19 
•25 






















































.40 




. 12 




















































1.25 
•39 




















1. 00 

2.00 

■53 




















•3° 
.02 






















.90 




































.11 
















■03 

.40 


























•33 


































.82 
2-75 














•°3 

• 45 
















.06 

•'5 




















.27 






















1.63 


































■30 








•27 










•3° 
. 10 








































'•45 

3- 25 

1.04 

t 

• 48 
1.09 
3-3° 




















































1.20 








t 










t 






■14 
.87 


•33 


•°5 




. 10 






































•54 
■13 
.06 

■5° 

t 




















t.36 


t 

.61 
•30 
■55 






.88 
.48 




















•05 


















.04 
























































t 






t 

t 

•°5 
■ 38 




.02 






































•°3 






t 


















t 






















































Wilber 




•47 








2-95 
































.21 
•°7 




















.85 
•32 


















.21 








1.40 














.08 






















1. 00 


















■"7 


























'•39 





























































t Trace (when precipitation is less than 0.01 of an inch). 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. 






REPORT FOR SEPTEMBER, 1898. 



NEBRASKA SECTION 



OK THE 



CLIMATE AND CROP SERVICE 



OF THE 



WEATHER BUREAU. 



PUBLISHED BY AUTHORITY OF THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE. 



UNDER DIRECTION OF 

WILLIS L. MOORE 

CHIEF OF WEATHER BUREAU 

G. A. hOVEhfljMD, 

SECTION DIRECTOR, 

Office, University of Nebraska, bincolp. 




GO 
35 



- 

33 

03 

72 



3 
^ 



> 

32 

3- 

Q 

z; 
< 

x 



x 

< 

g 

o 




September, 1898. 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



U. vS. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, 

Climate and Crop Service 

OF THE 

WEATHER BUREAU. 

CENTRAL OFFICE: WASHINGTON, D. C. 



NEBRASKA SECTION, 

G. A. LOVELAND, Section Director, 

LINCOLN, NEBR. 



Vol. III. 



LINCOLN, NEBR. 



No. 9. 



THE LOSS OF WATER FROM RESERVOIRS BY SEEPAGE 
AND EVAPORATION. 

The amount of water lost from reservoirs by seepage and 
evaporation is important to all investigating the possibilities 
of profitable irrigation. The Agricultural Experiment Sta- 
tion of Colorado has been investigating this subject for the 
past few years and publishes the results in Bulletin No. 45. 
This bulletin contains much valuable information that can 
not be reproduced here. The most important results have 
been condensed and appear on the last two pages of the bul- 
letin in what is called " Summary and Conclusions," and 
they are given below : 

1. Losses from reservoirs are from seepage and evaporation. 

2. Seepage losses are dependent on the condition of the reservoir 
site; therefore, different for different sites. 

3. Seepage losses were determined on a series of reservoirs, near Fort 
Collins, in the winter of 1895-96 and 1896-97. 

4. Seepage losses may be great. In the lakes under measurement 
the losses in some cases were less than from evaporation alone. 

5. In some cases lakes may gain from seepage from irrigated lands, 
and the gain may be more than the combined loss from seepage and 
evaporation. 

6. In the cases where loss from seepage occurred the loss was at the 
rate of about 2 feet in depth over the area of the lake per year. 

7. This amount does not necessarily apply to other sites, and other 
observations are needed before general statements respecting loss from 
this source can be made. 

8. Seepage decreases, after the lake is first filled, from the effect of 
silting and from having filled the porous ground underneath and con- 
nected with the site. 

9. Even in sand there is a limit to the amount of seepage and the 
time during which the loss is large. 

10. After sand beds connected with the reservoir are saturated the 
losses from seepage will decrease. 

10a. The loss increases with the depth, probably nearly as the square. 

11. Losses may be lessened, though not entirely prevented, by silting. 

12. The silting process is more efficient with small reservoirs, because 
of the better distribution of the silt. 

13. If the loss from seepage is not more than 2 feet per annum the 
sites may be considered practically water tight. In the case of canals 
the losses often average more than that in twenty-four hours. 

14. Losses from evaporation, in the cases examined, are greater than 
those from seepage. 

15. Evaporation is not necessarily the same from adjacent bodies of 
water. 

16. The amount of evaporation increases with the temperature of 
the water, with the wind, and diminishes with increased moisture in 
the air. 



17. From the standard evaporation tank at the experiment station 
the average evaporation for eleven years has been 41 inches. 

18. Evaporation proceeds when the water is frozen, but at a dimin- 
ished rate, averaging about 1 to 1$ inches per month. 

19. The evaporation at night is the same as during the day, the dif- 
ference being less with the increase of the size of the bodies of water. 

20. The loss by evaporation from several lakes exceeded that from 
the standard tank. 

21. The loss from the lakes was about 60 inches per year. 

22. The increase is due to higher temperature of the water and to 
freer exposure to the wind. 

23. In some of the summer months the lakes lost twice as much as 
the standard tank. 

24. The lower temperature of water at high elevations and the lower 
dew points tend to decrease the evaporation. 

25. The diminished barometric pressure tends to increase the evapo- 
ration, amounting to 14 per cent at 8,000 feet, and to 18 per cent at 
10,000 feet, over the evaporation at 5,000 feet. 

26. Every mile of wind movement in twenty-four hours increases the 
evaporation by from 1 to 2 per cent over the evaporation if calm. 

27. The winter period is longer at the high elevations. 

28. For the whole year the evaporation in all probability is consider- 
ably less at the high elevations than at the lower ones. 

29. Evaporation is lessened by any influence which diminishes the 
wind or decreases the temperature of the water. 

30. Protection of lakes by wind-breaks is in many cases practicable 
and in small lakes sometimes desirable. In the large lakes the benefit 
is by reducing the wind velocity; in small lakes both from effect on 
wind and by lessening action of sun. 

31. The deeper the lake the cooler the water as a whole, the cooler 
the surface, and consequently the less the evaporation. 

32. Assuming a loss of 5 feet in depth per annum, an area of 100 acres 
would require three-fourths of a cubit foot per second for the whole 
year to make good the losses from evaporation; one of 500 acres would 
require 3i cubit feet per second, considerably more than would be used 
to irrigate an equal area. 

33. The net loss to the reservoir would be the sum of the above losses 
from seepage and evaporation diminished by the rainfall, a combined 
loss which may be considered as a depth of 6 feet in one year. 

34. As irrigation reservoirs are usually full for a few months only the 
loss is much less than this for the high-water area. 



VALUE OF IRRIGATION INDICATED BY EXPERIENCE 
WITH DROUGHTS. 

In discussing " Some Historic Droughts," in the Monthly 
Weather Review for June, 1898, Prof. Cleveland Abbe says : 

Our scanty records make it quite impossible to present a really sat- 
isfactory summary of the meteorological conditions that prevailed 
during these historic droughts, but it is sufficiently evident that any 
locality between Pennsylvania and Maine may count upon having an ab- 
solute drought of three months' duration at least once in a century anil 
injurious droughts of a month's duration very much more frequently. 
It is by no means impossible for the farmer to secure admirable crops 
during such droughty seasons if he will make proper provision for 
artificial irrigation. It is much more business-like to profit by past 
experience and provide artesian wells, windmill water pumps, pro- 
tected reservoirs, and irrigating ditches than to neglect all these and 
spend one's time in praying for rain. Fast days and prayers were all 
right for the early settlers of the country, before they knew the exact 
nature of our climate, but now that three hundred years of records 
have accumulated and we know or ought to know how to succeed in 
the struggle against the inexorable laws of nature, it behooves us to 
profit by our experience. New England farmers have been very slow 
to realize the profit that is to be drawn from a parched soil and a 
cloudless sunny sky by the simple means of irrigation. Methods of 
cultivation that have made the desert spots of central Asia, Algeria, 
northern India, Australia, and California profitable gardens have until 
lately been ignored in New England. 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



September, 1898. 



CROP CONDITIONS. 

The first five days of the month were hot and dry, causing 
all crops to ripen rapidly. The second week was cool and 
cloudy, with heavy, general rains. Frosts killed late corn 
in western counties on the 6th and 7th, but generally crops 
ripened by the middle of the month uninjured by frosts. 
The heavy rains of the second week placed the ground in 
excellent condition for seeding. Rapid progress was made 
in plowing and in the sowing of wheat during the last two 
weeks of the month. The wheat sprouted quickly and grew 
rapidly and at the end of the month was in exceptionally 
fine condition. 

COMPARISON OF PAST SEPTEMBERS. 

id minimum temperatures for several sta- 

the years 187(5 to 1888, and the following 

liffers slightly from the comparative tables 



The monthly maximum ai 
tions have been obtained for 
table has been revised, and 
previously published : 

-— Temperature.- 

Mean. Max. Min 

6o.8 



1876 . 

1877 • 

1878 . 

1879 ■ 

1880 . 

1881 . 

1882 . 
1883 



1886 . 
1887 



65.6 
60.1 
61.0 
61.4 
62.4 
65.8 
59-2 
66.0 
63.6 
64-3 
63.2 
63-4 



94 
95 
96 

91 
93 

lor 

97 
94 
94 
96 

■<>3 
96 

100 



40 
32 



30 
33 
28 
39 
35 
31 
3° 
26 



Prec. 

3.63 

2.06 

1.90 
1.40 
2-74 
3-77 
0.92 
2.04 
1.66 
1.76 
2.69 
4.C9 
0.38 



-—Temperature.—, 
Mean. Max. Min. 



1893- 
1894. 
1895- 
1896. 
1897. 



59-3 
62.5 
66.8 
65-7 
64.7 
64.6 
68.0 
59-8 
70.6 
63.6 



Average for the 
State for past 
23 years 63.4 



101 
104 
no 
no 
109 
101 
no 
102 
113 
104 



24 
18 
30 
V 
'9 
25 
20 
16 
29 
23 



Tree. 

1.48 
0.99 
1.28 
0.48 
1.02 

I. 21 

i-39 
2.37 
1.26 
2.3° 



CLIMATOLOGY OF THE MONTH. 

General characteristics: The most important features of 
the past month were the period of general and heavy rains 
from the 9th to the 14th and an almost entire absence of 
rain on the other days of the month ; the early frosts occur- 
ring on the 5th to the 10th, which were light in eastern 
counties, but severe enough to kill corn in mauy western 
counties; and the warm, clear weather the last two weeks 
of the month. Earthquake shocks are reported from Lynch, 
Hartiugton, Creighton, and Santee Agency on the 16th, at 
times varying from 3.50 a. m. to 4.10 a. m. Note from 
Nebraska City : "Large hailstones fell on the 5th, many 7^ 
inches in circumference, oblate spheroids, smooth; 1| miles 
northeast stones fell of similar size, but with jagged edges; 
1 mile east the stones were of similar size, but ovate." 

Atmospheric pressure: The mean pressure was 29.96 inches, 
which is 0.06 of an inch below the normal for September. 
The highest during the month was 30.61 inches, at North 
Platte on the 10th, and the lowest, 29.54 inches, at North 
Platte on the 22d. 

Temperature: The mean temperature for the State, as de- 
termined from the records of 102 stations, was 63.6°, which 
is about the normal. The highest temperature was 104°, at 
Franklin on the 3d, and the lowest, 23°, at Camp Clarke on 
the 7th. 

Wind: The prevailing direction of the wind was from the 
south. The average velocity was 8.5 miles an hour, which 
is about the normal. The highest velocity was 40 miles an 
hour, at North Platte on the 5th, from the north. 

Precipitation: The average precipitation for the State, as 
determined from the records of 133 stations, was 2.30 inches, 
which is about one-half of an inch above the normal. The 



largest precipitation reported at any one station was 8.93 
inches, at Rulo, and the least, none, at Merriman. The 
precipitation for the first nine months of the year was 93 
per cent of the normal. 

Hail: Hail fell on the 2d, 4th, 5th, and 12th. 

Thunderstorms: Thunderstorms occurred on the 2d, 3d, 4th, 
5th, 6th, 9th, 10th, 13th, 15th, 16th, and 29th. 

Frost: Killing frost occurred on the 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th, 
13th, 14th, and 30th and light frost on the 5th, 6th, 7th, 
8th, 9th, 10th, 13th, 24th, 25th, 29th, and 30th. 

Wind and humidity table. 



Stations. 



Lincoln 

North Platte 
Omaha 



Wind. 



Miles. Mean. Max. Dir. Date 



7,007 
5.969 
5,36i 



9-7 
8.3 
7-4 



Humidity. 



Mean. 



64.6 
67.2 
6 5 -3 



Low- 
est. 



Date. 



3 
27 
28 



Means for the six equal sections of the State. 



Sections. 



Southeastern . 
Northeastern. 

Central 

Southwestern 

Western 

Northwestern 

State 



Temperature. 



Mean. 



67.3 
64.8 
62.9 
64.7 
59-7 
62.0 

63.6 



Aver- 
age.* 



66. s 
64.8 

64.5 
64.2 
62.8 
61.9 

64. 1 



Precipitation. 



3-72 
••55 
2.36 
4-34 
1. 17 
0.63 

2-3° 



Aver- 
age.t 



2.38 
2.52 
2.24 
1.88 
1. 14 
0.91 

1.84 



Number of days- 



Rainy. Clear. £%$* Cloudy 



19.4 
'9-3 
21.6 
20.7 
21.7 
20.6 

20.6 



5-6 

5-2 
3-1 
4-2 
3-9 
3-8 



5-2 
5-5 
5-3 
5-i 
4.4 
5-6 

5-2 



* For ten years. t For twenty years. 

Supplemental precipitation table. 



Stations. 



Bartley 

Bassett 

Bellevue 

Benedict 

Burchard 

Cody 

C'ornlea 

Culbertson 

Divide 

Eden 

Elba 

Ewing 

Fairfield 

Fairmont 

Gordon 

Haigler 

Hayes Center... 

Hickman 

Hooper 

Johnstown 

Lyons 

McCool.Tunct. . . 

Marquette 

Merriman 

Monroe 

Nemaha 

Norman 

Ord 

Osceola 

Ough 

Palmer 

Plattsmouth — 

St. Libory 

Salem 

Sargent 

Schuyler 

Sioux City, Iowa 

Spragg 

Stockham 

Strang 

Stratum 

Syracuse 

Table Rock 

Valparaiso 

Wauneta 

Wilber 

Willard 

Wisner 

Wymore 

Yankton, S. Dak 



Counties. 



Red Willow 

Rock 

Sarpy 

York 

Pawnee — 

Cherry 

Platte 

Hitchcock . 
Sherman . . . 
Nemaha . . . 
Howard — 

Holt 

Clay 

Fillmore .. . 
Sheridan . . . 

Dundy 

Hayes 

Lancaster . 

Dodge 

Brown 

Burt 

York 

Hamilton . . 

Cherry 

Platte 

Nemaha . . . 
Kearney . . . 

Valley 

Polk 

Dundy 

Merrick — 

Cass 

Howard . . . 
Richardson 

Custer 

Colfax 



Rock 

Hamilton . 
Fillmore .. 
Hitchcock 

Otoe 

Pawnee ... 
Saunders.. 

Chase 

Saline 

Lincoln ... 
Cuming ... 
Gage 



Length 
of rec- 
orders 



Total. 



4-i5 
0.27 
3-78 
2.21 

4.70 
0.50 



3-9° 



5-77 
2.40 
0.72 
4-50 
3-3° 
1.40 
3.20 

3-65 
2.50 
2.07 



1.68 
2.79 
2.44 
0.00 
1.68 
5.08 
4-54 
2-75 
1.91 
3- 80 
3.18 
2.40 
3- 30 
7-55 



2-5" 
0.95 
0.30 
7. 10 
2-5' 
4.48 
2.90 
7. n 
2-55 
4-49 
3.02 



1. 19 
3-49 
1.25 



Depart- 
ure from 
normal 



— 0.62 



+ 2.79 



+ 2.67 
+0.54 
— 0.40 



+0.74 
+2.51 



+0.56 



+0.79 



+3-26 
+ I-43 



+I.I5 

-0-53 



+5-°7 



No. 
rainy 
days. 



Observers. 



R.S.Baker. 

A. H. Gale. 

E.F.Stouffer. 

R.B. Brabham. 

J. A.Kinsey. 

C.M.Heinly. 

E.J. Couch. 

Mrs. L.A.Wibley. 

M.H.Smith. 

D.J.Wood. 

S.M.Wellman. 

G. H.Benson. 

M. L.Jones. 

G.H.Borden. 

Amos Bur well. 

T.P.F. Haine. 

R.C.Orr. 

O.O.Franklin. 

T.W.Lyman. 

D.W. Alspaugh. 

N.R.Kellam. 

F.S.Morris. 

John Ellis. 

F. Hussong. 
Wm. Webster. 
R.J. Duff. 
J.F.Barnes. 
Jas. Milford. 

G. W. Murbarger. 
Wm.Ough. 
E.H. Smith. 
W.Z.Pickett. 
W.I.Meader. 
W.W.McDermet. 
J.S.Spooner. 
L.N.Dickinson. 
Weather Bureau. 
S.W. Spragg. 
J.W.Gray. 
S.Diller. 
C.W.Shurtliff. 
L.Howell. 
S.H.Dopp. 
W.J.Craven. 
J.W.llann. 
S.E.Davis. 
Wesley W.Lewis. 
N.c. Sears. 
H.B.Ware. 
Weather Bureau. 



September, 1898. 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



Climatolog-ical data for Nebraska, September, 1898. 



Stations. 



Northeastern Sec. 

Agee * 

Blair 

Columbus 

Creighton 

Fremont 

Hartington 

Lynch* 

Madison 

Norfolk 

Oakdale 

Omaha 

O'Neill 

Santee Agency 

Stanton* 

Tekamah 

Wakefield 

Westpoint 

Southeastern Sec. 

Arborville* 

Ashland 

Auburn * 

Aurora * 

Beatrice 

Crete 

David City 

Dawson * 

Edgar * 

Fairbury 

Geneva 

Harvard 

Hebron 

Lincoln 

Nebraska City 

Odell* 

Rulo* 

Seward * 

Superior* 

Tecumseh 

Turlington 

Weepingwater * 

York* 

Central Sec. 

Albion 

Ansley 

Ashton* 

Broken bow* 

Burwell* 

Callaway 

Central City* 

Dunning* 

Erieson * 

Genoa 

Gothenburg 

Grand Island 

Greeley * 

Kearney * 

Lexington 

Loup* 

North Loup 

Ravenna 

St. Paul* 

Southwestern Sec. 

Alma* 

Arapahoe * 

Beaver City 

Benkelman* 

Bluehill* 

Curtis 

Franklin 

Hastings* 

Holdrege * 

Imperial 

McCook * 

Madrid * 

Minden 

Redcloud * 

Republican* 

Wilsonville 

Western Sec. 

Camp Clarke 

Gering « 

Kimball 

Lodgepole 

Nesbit 

North Platte 

Seneca* 

Thedford* 

Whitman* 

Northwestern Sec. 

Alliance * 

Fort Robinson 

Hay Springs 

Kennedy 

Kirkwood * 

Springview 

Valentine 



Counties. 



Holt 

Washington. 

Platte 

Knox 

Dodge 

Cedar 

Boyd 

Madison 

...do 

Antelope 

Douglas 

Holt 

Knox 

Stanton 

Burt 

Dixon 

Cuming 



York 

Saunders 

Nemaha 

Hamilton ... 

Gage 

Saline 

Butler 

Richardson . 

Clay 

Jefferson 

Fillmore 

Clay 

Thayer 

Lancaster... 

Otoe 

Gage 

Richardson . 

Seward 

Nuckolls 

Johnson 

Otoe 

Cass 

York 



Boone — 
Custer . . . 
Sherman . 
Custer . . . 
Garfield .. 
Custer . . . 
Merrick . . 
Blaine — 
Wheeler.. 
Platte 
Dawson . . 

Hall 

Greeley .. 
Buffalo... 
Dawson . . 
Sherman . 
Valley ... 
Buffalo... 
Howard . . 



Harlan 

Furnas 

...do 

Dundy 

Webster 

Frontier 

Franklin 

Adams 

Phelps 

Chase 

Red Willow. 

Perkins 

Kearney 

Webster 

Harlan 

Furnas 



Cheyenne . . . 
Scotts Bluff. 

Kimball 

Cheyenne . . . 

Logan 

Lincoln 

Thomas 

...do 

Grant 



Box Butte . 

Dawes 

Sheridan ... 

Cherry 

Rock 

Keya Paha . 
Cherry 



, IOO 

,051 
,792 
,235 
,36s 

,619 

945 
,722 
,316 
,633 
,812 
,458 
,199 

941 
,278 

842 
.435 
,574 
.113 
,214 
,080 
,642 

1,747 
2,307 
2,061 

2,477 
2,180 
2,555 
1,708 
2,621 
2,029 
1,584 
2,557 
1,860 
2,010 
2, 146 
2,385 
2,067 
1,961 
2,028 
1,796 

1,939 
2,173 
2,147 
2,968 
i,9 6 7 
2,553 
1,820 
1,932 
2,324 
3,278 
2,506 
3,294 
2, 169 
1,687 
1,939 



3,7«° 



4,697 
3,820 



2,841 
2,971 



3,968 
3,764 
3,821 



Temperature, in degrees Fahrenheit. 



2,613 



23 



63-4 
66.8 
65-5 
62.6 
64.7 
64.3 
61.3 
64.2 
64. 1 
63.8 
68.3 
63-4' 
69.4 



65. 
65- 
63. 
66.2 

64.2 
67.4 
68.6 
64.9 
68.2 
68.1 
65.0 

695 

64.2 
67.4 

64-5 
64.4 
67.4 
68.2 
69.2" 
67.6 
70.8 
66.6 
71.0 
69.6 
68.8 
64.7 
65.5 

62. 1 ■ 
62.0 

65.8 
58.1 



65-4 



64.8 
65.6 
60.7 
64.1 
64-5 
68.3 
61.5 
61.7 
64.6 
64.7 
65.6 

61.8' 
61.0 
66.2 
60.0 
66.1 
64.6 
67.3 
68.4 



65-4 
65.0 
60.6 
64.2 
66.6 

63.5 
64.0 

61.6 

58.0 
60.5 
58.8 
59-6 
62.3 
59-4 
60.2 

57-2 



62.0 
60.4 
60.4 
63.8 
62.9 
62.2 



5§ 



+0.1 

—0-5 
+0.9 



+0.5 
+0.4 

+3-5 
— 1.6 
+4.8 
+0.4 
+ 0.2 



-3-6 
— 0.2 
— 0.2 



+ 0.4 
+2.1 

+ 2.2 



—2-3 
—1.6 

+°-5 
+ 1.0 

+3-1 



—2. 1 
+2.S 



+3-3 
—2.9 



— 2.0 
— 1.9 



—8.0 
+ 1.6 



—3-3 
+ 1-7 



—3-2 
+ o] 5 ' 



— 0.2 
+ 2.1 



—4.0 

—0.6 



-4.9 
-2.2 



—0.6 



-6.4 



0.0 
+0.6 
—2-5 



—2-5 
+0.1 



102 
97 
95 
99. 
97 
98 
96 
98 
96 
92 

100 
99 
94 

100 

95 
99 



46 



5° 



Precipitation, in inches. 



e o 





3 


48 


7 




3 


44 


4 


62 


7 




8 




6 


52 


7 




3 




5 


40 


19 




5 




3 


68 


3 



1.47 
2.08 
2.41 

I. II 

i-95 
1. 10 
0.67 
1.44 
1.46 
0-93 
2-94 
1.29 
0.82 
1.64 
2.62 
1. 19 
1.30 

2.97 
2.90 

4-37 
3- 02 
3-41 
2.25 
2.20 
7-59 
3-1.5 
3-72 
3-35 
4-37 
2.47 
2.32 

3-57 
3-26 
8.93 
2.21 
4.00 
4.48 
3-72 
2.66 
2.16 

1.28 
1.64 
2.61 
1.38 
0.86 
1.50 
2.07 



0.91 
2.02 
3-oi 
3-72 
1.80 
3-4° 
2.92 
3-23 
1.78 
3.1° 
2.96 

5-69 
6.03 

5-51 
3.20 
3.58 
3-7° 
4-12 
3.65 
5-°5 
4.02 
3-95 
2-75 
4-39 
4-75 
5-4° 
4.25 

0.30 
0.28 
0.60 
2.25 
1.78 
2.56 
1.70 
1. 10 
T. 



0.76 

1.31 

0.71 
0.49 
0.52 
0.64 



a 



— o. 16 



+ 0-34 
— 0.64 
— 0.04 
—0.44 
—1.26 
— 0.25 
—1.68 
— 0.20 
+ 0.04 
— 0.56 
—0.88 
+ 0.27 
+ 1.00 



—0.64 

+ 1-39 
+o-43 
+ 2.38 

+ 0. ^0 
+ I.63 
+ O.52 

+ 0-37 
+5.64 
+ °-35 
+ 1.62 
+ 1.30 
+ 2-77 
+0. 19 
+0.41 
+0-34 



+ o-39 
+ ■•59 
+ 2.27 

+ 1.71 
—0.03 

+°-34 



+0.30 
+ 1.09 



— 0.24 
+ 0.52 
— 0.02 



—0.71 
—0-75 
+ 1.51 
+ 2.28 



+ 0.96 
+ 1-49 



+ 0.37 
+ 1.26 



+3-57 
+3-75 
+ 2.42 



+ 2.64 
+ 2-35 
+ 1.68 
+ 2.92 
+3-43 



+ 2.31 
+ 1-95 
+ 2-37 



— o-37 
+ 0.05 



+0.85 
+ I-45 



-o-37 



+0.13 
+0.66 
—0.15 



-0-55 
-0.44 



1. 14 
0-93 
1. 00 
0.68 
1. 19 
0.46 
0.47 
0.56 
°-45 
0-51 
1-35 
1. 00 
0.62 
0.81 
1.60 

0-55 
0.67 

i-3° 
1. 14 
1.58 
1.63 
0.97 
1.32 
1.20 
3- 70 
1-53 
1-25 
1-57 
1. 21 

o-75 
1. 00 
0.96 
2.40 

3-9° 
0.70 
1.60 
1.70 
'•39 
■ .36 
°-75 

0.52 

°-55 
1. 17 

0.43 
0.40 
1. 00 
0.69 



0.60 
0.99 
1-25 
1. 81 
0.90 
i- 2 5 
0-93 

1. 17 
0.65 
1. 10 
1.20 

1-53 
2.15 
2-37 
1-95 
1-25 
2.36 
1.60 
1.84 
1-5° 
3-32 
2.25 
1.60 
1. 14 

2-55 
1.70 
1.80 

o. 16 

O.I5 

0.50 

0.75 
0.67 

1. 18 
0.60 
0.40 

T. 



0.27 
0.86 
0.26 
0.17 

0.44 
o-34 






1-5 



■5^ 



CD ^ 



Sky. 
>, 

is *» 

&s 

So ; pi 

& 55 



23 



O to 
oT3 



'-"T3 

'■a a 



nw. 
se. 



s. 

sw. 

s. 

s. 

se. 

nw. 



s. 

sw. 

nw. 



s. 

se. 

se. 

se. 

nw. 



se. 
sw. 



sw. 
sw. 
se. 



ne. 
se. 
nw. 

s. 
ne. 



sw. 
ne. 

s. 

se. 

n. 

s. 

nw. 

sw. 

s. 

ne. 



nw. 
ne. 



s. 

sw. 

ne. 

sw. 

ne. 

s. 

n. 



w. 

se. 

s. 

se. 

nw. 

n. 



nw. 
n. 



Observers. 



R.E.Bowden. 

E. A. Palmer. 
C.C.Gray. 

Dr. Geo. Roberts. 

Wm. J. Phillips. 

T. B.A.Watson. 

C.C.Irwin. 

Dr. F.A.Long. 

Dr. P. H.Salter. 

G.S.Clingman. 

U. S. Weather Bureau. 

O.M.Collins. 

W.H.Hamlin. 

W.Gerecke. 

Dr. A. D. Nesbit. 

I. H. Weaver. 

C.J.Kadish. 

E.D.Smith. 

Dr.A.S. vMansfelde. 

G.D.Carrington. 

H.C.Miller. 

C. Kellam. 

Doane College. 

E.B.Taylor. 

M.L.Libbee. 

J.W.Hoberg. 

W.F.Cramb. 

F.M.Flory. 

Dr. J. T.Fleming. 

Dr.C.M.Easton. 

U. S. Weather Bureau. 

E.Morton. 

W.F.Denton. 

W.F.Gingrich. 

L.E.Ost. 

L.W.Hahn. 

C.M.Miller. 

Wm.N. Hunter. 

G. Treat. 

O.P.Lowry. 

F.A.Pettinger. 
Chas.R.Hare. 

F. Rein. 
H.L.Ormsby. 
W.S.Green. 
Geo.B.Mair. 
J. A.McRae. 
E.E.Bolejack. 
A.Dahl. 

Geo. S.Truman. 
A. V. Carlson. 
E.Corbin. 
J. A.Pinkerton. 

C. E. Magner. 
IraP.Griswold. 
E.S.Hayhurst. 
J.E.Goodrich. 
Erastus Smith. 
Paul Anderson. 

R.E. Pitcher. 
J F.Edwards. 
C.G.George. 
W.E. Winger. 
C.S. Draper. 
Dr. S.R. Razee. 
F.T.Owen. 
J.C.Swarts. 
C.Engstrom. 
Robert Malcolm. 
C.T.Watson. 
John McKenzie. 
Joel Hull. 
W.K. Hayes. 
W.Burdon. 

D. F. Hostetter. 

Robt. II. Willis. 

J.P.Finley. 

F.J. Bellows. 

A.B.Persinger. 

G.E.Bolkrom. 

IT. S. Weather Bureau. 

D.McNall. 

O.G.Norton. 

F.D.Gallup. 

J.W.Wollick. 
Post surgeon. 

C. A. Waterman. 

D. A.Pierey. 
Mrs.C. A. Arter. 
Miss Ezada Phelps. 
U.S. Weather Bureau. 



* Temperature data from thermometers not self registering t Occurred on more than one day. \ '', «, etc., indicate number of days missing from observed readings. 
All records are used in determining State or district means, but State and district departures are determined by comparison of current data of only stations with normals. 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



September, 1898. 




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CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



September, 1898. 



Daily precipitation for Nebraska, September, 1898. 



Stations. 


Day of month. 




i. 


2. 


3- 


4. 


5. 


6. 


7- 


8. 


9- 


10. 


11. 


12. 


13- 


14- 


15- 


16. 


17. 


18. 


'9- 


20. 


21. 


22. 


23- 


24. 


25- 


26. 


27. 


28. 


29. 


30. 


3«- 


3 






















.10 

• 45 


•°5 
.10 


t 


.18 
• 52 


1. 14 
.18 


.01 




t 
.02 
































1.47 






















































































































•55 
1.00 


•32 
1-23 
1.30 
1. 14 

.84 
1.63 

.58 
1.22 

•25 
1. 00 
.22 
.06 
t 

.16 
.22 


.56 

2.15 
.11 

'■85 
2-37 
.84 
.18 
••25 
•43 

+ 

.14 
.36 


.21 

■ 25 
.76 

'.58 
1.27 
.18 
1-39 
'■95 

■ 46 
.18 
•19 
.40 

1. 00 








































I.64 
6.03 
2.97 
2.90 

4-37 
3.02 
3-41 
5-51 
3.20 


























I .40 


















































.69 
•°3 


•03 
.„. 










































t 


•57 
1. 12 


t 


.28 


•79 


.06 
•3° 










































•5° 


























• 03 










. 12 












t 
































■97 








.83 
• 35 
.28 














































.02 
• '3 
■93 






.16 






















































































.02 




t 


.18 






.06 








































t 






1- 15 

.40 
.18 
•5° 

t 
t 




t 

.14 
































3.58 
1.38 
0.86 










































































.22 


















































t 




t 
































1-5° 
0.30 
2.41 




t 


t 


t 
t 


























t 
























.01 

t 


1. 00 




. 10 


■ 42 
•25 
.90 
•3' 
•32 


.41 
.68 


t 
■°5 






t 
























































.02 
















• 33 
•15 
.22 


•99 

• 44 
.80 
1. 00 


•°3 

2.73 
2.36 






























2.25 
3- 90 

3-70 


















•17 






.10 




















































































t 














1.20 
















































































































1-35 
•15 
•'7 


.60 

.62 

1-35 
•25 
.98 
•3° 
.70 

•3° 

•'5 

.80 

1. 81 

■63 
-77 


•75 
.60 

•65 
•55 


•45 

•35 
.90 








































3-'5 
0.91 
3-72 
3-30 
0.76 
4.12 
"•95 
3-35 




















.16 
.68 
•50 
















































1-25 


































































































.27 
















■ 24 

1.60 
•25 

1-57 
.20 

■13 

.70 






















































.82 
.01 
•83 


■52 
1. 19 
•25 
•99 








.20 




































• °5 




t 


•15 
t 
.29 
















































t 












t 




































.21 






•03 






































t 




























































t 


1-25 
•23 
.70 

.66 
1.07 


.26 

.10 
•99 
•25 








t 
. II 
































3.01 
3-72 














t 




.06 

.20 

• 44 
•23 

• 05 




















































.90 

•°5 
.60 
1-25 






































.02 






•03 






.46 






























t 












1. 21 
. 12 




•05 


























4-37 
3-65 
3-6 5 
1. 31 
2.47 
2.50 
5-05 
4.02 
3-40 
0.71 












•°5 






.09 












































































+ 


t 














•25 
•75 
•65 

1. 00 
.12 

1-25 


.20 
■7i 

• 7° 
1.05 

.10 

.26 
.10 

■57 
.80 
.60 

• 27 

.07 










.86 

.02 
















































.68 
■55 
•75 
3-32 
1. 00 
•05 
•50 

•75 
.02 

•75 
1. 17 

1.60 
•93 
•'9 
.96 


•31 
•3° 

1-5° 
.46 

■•■5 
.18 
















































•30 


























































+ 


•75 

.02 




















































t 






































































































.22 
































Kimball 








































































•17 


•°9 

■93 
•34 
•15 
.80 
. 10 
•32 
.36 


.07 

■ 49 
1. 00 

•75 
•49 
.10 

1.36 

.56 

1- 15 

2.25 

•92 
1. 14 
1. 19 
2.76 

•3° 

.21 
• 45 
1. 18 

•5' 
2.40 

1-35 
•'5 
.96 








.16 
.18 


























t 






o.49 
2.92 
2.32 
2.25 
3-23 
0.67 
1.68 


























































+ 


t 






.16 




































































































•33 

• 47 






•17 












































































































































•35 




.02 








.08 


+ 




t 
































1.44 
2-75 
3-95 
2-44 
4-39 
3-57 
5-o8 
1.78 
































































•43 
•79 
.87 
1.27 


•13 
.18 
.20 
•15 


+ 




.21 
. II 
.14 












































t 






•25 
1.08 


























t 


















































.21 


■75 
1-93 


































t 
t 
























•39 

.07 












































•39 
■45 
•3° 
.20 
•34 


•35 
.01 
.20 
.16 


• 67 

.04 
•65 
.80 








































.02 






t 






•31 
.08 
.04 
.08 

•°7 

1. 00 
.16 


■42 








































. IO 


































1.78 

2.^6 




















.18 




































t 






t 

.24 
.63 






































o-93 
3.26 
2.94 














. 12 


■50 








































.20 


t 




. 10 


•■7 
.04 
•25 


•52 
•54 


t 

3- 80 
•70 
•45 
.91 

1.40 
•55 
• 17 

1.50 












































t 










































t 




































1. 91 






















































3.80 












1. 10 








•5° 
.60 


•35 

•55 
2-55 

.40 
•45 
.40 
.01 


•53 

1. 10 
•97 
1-5° 
i-75 
1.20 

•5° 
.18 








































3.18 


















•15 
•32 
.80 

"63 
.62 






•25 
































3' I0 


















































4-75 




















1.70 






































5' 4° 








•15 


.16 


1.49 
.04 
1.05 


3-9° 










•45 
•07 
•35 


.08 






























8.93 












.40 
•45 
.01 






























2.96 










.20 


3-io 




































7-55 










0.82 




































































.48 








■ 3° 
.60 
•5° 
• 44 
.08 

1.68 

1. 10 
•75 
•30 

'•39 
.06 
t 

1.06 
.09 
t 
■75 

1.40 

•75 


•35 
.20 
.60 


.58 
.20 

•35 


•50 
.10 
.06 


•3° 




































2.51 
1.70 






.60 
































































.70 




























































.08 
































0.52 
1.64 
2.51 
4.00 
4.48 






• 32 






t 
t 








.36 


'•63 
.20 

■73 

.03 
.„. 

"t 


.81 
.20 
1.60 

•73 
1.60 
.. f 

•55 
1.36 
.67 


.07 






























t 






























































.70 


.40 
•27 
.20 
.16 
.06 
•32 
.04 
.18 


















































1.70 












•30 


































.12 




•°3 


• 15 
.68 






•25 






























t 
•°5 








































3-72 
0.64 
1. 19 
2.66 








.04 








■34 
. 12 
. 12 
■34 

t 


t 




•14 






























.20 




t 

.08 
.02 
































t 




















































t 














































1.30 

t 




























































•57 








•65 
1.80 

•57 


i- °5 
.10 
.20 








































3- 02 
4.25 
2.16 


















•95 
.38 












































.16 














.10 





























































































t Trace (when precipitation is less than 0.01 of an inch). 



* No dates given. 






#3 



^» 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. 



REPORT FOR OCTOBER, 1898. 



NEBRASKA SECTION 



OF THE 



CLIMATE AND CROP SERVICE 



OF THE 



WEATHER BUREAU. 



r 



^ PUBLISHED BY AUTHORITY OF THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE. 



UNDER DIRECTION OP 

WILLIS L. MOORE 

CHIEF OF WEATHER BUREAU 
15 Y 

G. A. hOVEbAND, 

SECTION DIRECTOR, 

Office, University of Nebraska, bincolp. 




Natural History Libra 



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October, 1898. 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



3 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, 

Climate and Crop Service 

OK THE 

WEATHER BUREAU. 

CENTRAL OFFICE: WASHINGTON, D. C. 



NEBRASKA SECTION, 

G. A. LOVELAND, Section Director, 

LINCOLN, NEBR. 



Vol. III. 



LINCOLN, NEBR. 



No. 10. 



REVIEW OF THE CROP SEASON FOR 1898. 

The fall of 1897 was very favorable for fall-sown grain in 
Nebraska. A large acreage of wheat was sown, which gener- 
ally came up well, made a good growth, and started the win- 
ter with a vigorous plant. The ground froze up moist, and 
was followed by an exceptionally heavy snowfall in Decem- 
ber, 1897. In the absence of high winds the snow drifted 
little, and wheat was much better protected than is usually 
the case in Nebraska. Fall-sown wheat wintered exception- 
ally well, and began to grow in southern counties the last- 
week in February. 

The first three weeks of March were warm and pleasant, 
and farm work was pushed rapidly forward, except in the 
northwestern portion of the State, where very little, if any, 
farm work was done during March. Low temperature, accom- 
panied in the eastern sections by sleet and snow, retarded 
work during the last ten days of March. The soil was in 
excellent condition in most parts of the State during March. 
However, in a few of the western counties it was too dry for 
seed to germinate, and in the extreme southeastern section 
it was rather too wet to be worked part of the time. 

The first ten days of April were favorable for farm work. 
Seeding of spring wheat and oats was pushed rapidly forward, 
and plowing for corn was quite generally commenced. The 
period, however, was cold and not favorable for growth, the 
minimum temperatures often being about 20°. Winter wheat 
and grass made but slight growth, and oats and spring wheat 
did not start well. Warm weather, following a general rain 
on the 11th, was exceptionally favorable for the rapid growth 
of vegetation. Winter wheat recovered from the effects of 
the unfavorable weather the last of March and early in April. 
Spring wheat and oats started nicely. Plowing for corn was 
rushed rapidly forward, and at the end of April in most parts 
of the State the larger portion of the corn ground was ready 
to receive the seed. Very little corn had been planted, how- 
ever, due to the continued low temperature. 

The first week of May was cool, cloudy, and wet — exceed- 
ingly favorable for rye, wheat, and grass, but retarding all 
farm work, and but little corn was planted. The second week 
in May was cool, but with little rain, and favorable for farm 
work. Corn planting had been so delayed that a very large 
acreage was planted during this period. The last half of 
May was warm and wet, and all vegetation grew rapidly, but 



farm work was retarded. At the end of the month most of 
the corn was planted, the early-planted was up, with a fair 
stand, and cultivation had commenced, but in nearly all 
counties a few fields were yet unplanted. Rye, wheat, and 
grass made a very rank growth during May. Pasturage was 
exceptionally fine, including the ranges in the western coun- 
ties, and stock was in excellent condition. 

The first half of June was wet, delaying the cultivation of 
corn, and the crop was very weedy by the middle of June. 
The temperature was slightly above normal, and all small 
grain and grass grew exceedingly well during this period. 
The last half of June was warm, with less than the normal 
rainfall — favorable conditions for killing weeds, and most 
corn fields were fairly clear of weeds at the end of June. 
Corn, however, was small for the season of the year. 

The first ten days of July were favorable for all crops. The 
rainfall was below normal, but was sufficient for crop needs. 
The harvest of winter wheat and rye, which commenced the 
last of June, was pushed rapidly forward under the most 
favorable conditions. All grain ripened rapidly — a little too 
rapidly for the best yield. The next two weeks were dry and 
hot — exceedingly favorable for harvesting, and most of the 
small grain was secured in exceptionally fine condition, al- 
though the harvest was not completed in northern counties 
at the end of the period. Except in the northern counties, 
corn was considerably damaged by drought during this 
period. The precipitation during July was above normal 
in a few northern counties and below normal elsewhere. 
The greatest deficiency was in Colfax, Butler, Polk, York, 
Fillmore, Thayer, and Jefferson counties, where the defi- 
ciency ranged from 3 to 4 inches. The actual rainfall in a 
considerable portion of this district during the entire month 
of July was less than half an inch. 

The first week of August was marked by heavy, general 
rains throughout the State, which relieved all drought con- 
ditions. The rains were beneficial to corn in northern 
counties, but in most central and southern counties the crop 
had suffered permanent injury from the July drought, and 
was not materially improved by these rains. The last three 
weeks of August were dry and the last two weeks exceedingly 
hot. Corn matured very rapidly during the last half of 
August, and during the last few days was damaged by high 
temperature and a lack of moisture in the soil. The ground 
was moist during the second and third weeks of August, and 
a large amount of plowiug was done, but the next week the 
ground was rather too dry to work to advantage. 

The first five days of September were hot and dry, causing 
all crops to ripen rapidly. The second week was cool and 
cloudy, with heavy, general rains. Frosts were general 
throughout the State on the 6th and 7th, but were light, ex- 
cept in western counties, where the late corn was killed by 
the frost. Generally, crops ripened by the middle of Sep- 
tember uninjured by frosts. Rapid progress was made in 
plowing and in the sowing of wheat during the last two 
weeks of September. The wheat sprouted quickly and grew 
rapidly, and at the end of the month was in exceptionally 
fine condition. 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



October, 1898. 



COMPARISON OF PAST OCTOBERS. 



The monthly maximum an 
tions have been obtained for 

table has been revised, and d 
previously published : 

^Temperature. -> 
Mean. Max. Min. 
, 48.2 81 22 



d minimum temperatures for several sta- 
tue years 1876 to 1888, and the following 
iffers slightly from the comparative tables 



1876 . 

1877 . 
1878 . 
1879. 
1880 . 
1881 . 
1882 . 

1883 , 

1884 . 
1885. 

1886 . 

1887 . 

[88R . 



46.4 
48.3 
54-2 
46.7 
5'-' 

46.0 

54-8 
48.6 
54-5 
45-2 
47-7 



76 
87 
«9 
88 
85 
82 

89 
87 
88 
96 
93 
86 



-\< 



Prec. 

0.98 

2.92 

o-39 

1.03 

..78 

3-42 

2.23 

3.58 

I.71 

1.80 

0.86 

0.88 

°-93 



.—Temperature.^ 
Mean. Max. Min. I'rec. 



1890 

1891 

1892 

1893 

■ 894 

1895 

1896 

1897 

1898 

Average for the 
State for past 
23 years 



51-5 
5°-t 
50.7 
53-0 
50.0 
52.4 
48.1 
47-9 
53- S 
46.9 



9' 
92 
92 
96 
95 
92 
9' 
9' 
98 

97 



50. 90 



0-93 
0.93 
1.96 
1.71 
o-3i 

1.21 
0.22 
I.83 

3-34 
0.90 



■ •56 



CLIMATOLOGY OF THE MONTH. 

General characteristics: The month was characterized by 
low temperature and deficient precipitation. Killing frosts 
occurred on the morning of the 5th and 6th in all parts of 
the State, except the extreme southeastern section, where 
vegetation was not killed until affected by the low tempera- 
tures accompanying the snow-storm of the 17th and 18th. 
This storm was unusually severe for an October storm, espe- 
cially in eastern Nebraska, where the Snowfall averaged 
about 4 inches, and where usually little if any snow falls in 
October. For thirty-six hours the temperature was about 
or slightly below freezing, the wind was blowing steadily 
about 30 miles an hour, and most of the tirrte snow was fall- 
ing in large, moist flakes. 

Atmospheric pressure: The mean pressure was 30.06 inches, 
which is 0.01 of an inch below the normal for October. 
The highest during the month was 30.62 inches, at North 
Platte on the 25th, and the lowest, 29.33 inches, at North 
Platte on the 1st. 

Temperature: The mean temperature for the State, as de- 
termined from the records of 101 stations, was 46.9°, which 
is 3.5° below the normal. The highest temperature was 97°, 
at Camp Clarke on the 1st, and the lowest, 6°, at Fort Rob- 
inson on the 26th. 

Wind: The prevailing direction of the wind was from the 
northwest. The average velocity was 10.2 miles an hour, 
which is about 2 miles above the normal. The highest 
velocity was 48 miles an hour, at Lincoln on the 17th, from 
the north. 

Precipitation: The average precipitation for the State, as de- 
termined from the records of 128 stations, was 0.90 of an inch, 
which is about one-half of an inch below the normal. The 
largest precipitation reported at any one station was 8.90 
inches, at Brokenbow, and the least, none, at several north- 
western stations. The precipitation for the first ten months 
of the year was 90 per cent of the normal. 

Snow: Most of the snow of the month fell in the one storm 
of the 17th and 18th, and was heaviest in the eastern section 
of the State. The average snowfall (in inches) for the sev- 
eral sections was as follows: Southeastern, 3.9; northeast- 
ern, 4.8; central, 0.6; southwestern, 0.8; western, 0.7; 
northwestern, 1.4; average snowfall for the State, 2.0. 
This is the largest snowfall recorded in the eastern sections 



of the State for the month of October during the past twenty 
years. In the central and western sections the snowfall for 
October has often been larger than it was this year. 

Hail: Hail fell on the 9th. 

Thunderstorms: Thunderstorms occurred on the 7th, 9th, 
10th, and 12th. 

Wind and humidity table. 





Wind. 


Humidity. 


Stations. 


Miles. 


Mean. 


Max. 


Dir. 


Date. 


Mean. 


Low- 
est. 


Date. 




10,722 
8,167 
7.044 


14.4 
11. 
9-5 


48 
42 
3° 


n. 

nw. 

nw. 


17 
17 
17 


69.2 
63.8 
67.0 


29 
26 
31 




North Platte 












Means for the six equal sections of the State. 



Southeastern . 
Northeastern!, 

Central 

Southwestern 

Western 

Northwestern 



State . 



Temperature. 


Precipitation. 




Number 


of days 


- 


Mean. 


Aver- 
age.* 


Mean. 


Aver- 
ages 


Rainy. 


Clear. 


Partly 
cloudy. 


Cloudy. 


49-5 
47-1 
47.2 
48.0 
44-9 
44.6 

46.9 


51-8 
59-9 
SO. 2 
51-6 
49-3 
48.3 

5°-4 


1. 61 
1.80 
0.80 
0.82 
0.22 
°-"5 
0.90 


2.36 
1.69 
1.36 
1-37 
i.og 
1. 12 

1-5° 


4.8 
5-6 
2.8 
3-2 
1.8 
■■5 
3-3 


11. 7 
12.2 
15-9 
14.8 
17-5 
16.6 

14.8 


9.6 

9-9 

7.0 

8.4- 

8.0 

6.6 

8.2 


9.6 
8.8 
8.0 
7.8 
5-5 
7-8 

7-9 



* For ten years. t For twenty years. 

Supplemental precipitation table. 



Stations. 



Bartley 

Bassett 

Bellevue 

Benedict 

Bradshaw 

Burchard 

Chester 

C'latonia 

Cody 

Culbertson 

Dannebrog 

Eden 

Elba 

Ewing 

Fairfield 

Fairmont 

Gordon 

Haigler 

Hayes Center. .. 

Hickman 

Hooper 

Johnstown 

Lyons 

McCool Junct. . . 

Marquette 

Merriman 

Monroe 

Nemaha 

Norman 

Ord 

Osceola 

Ough 

Palmer 

Palmyra 

Plattsmouth 

Pleasanthill 

St.Libory 

Salem 

Sargent 

Schuyler 

Sioux City, Iowa 

Spragg 

State Farm 

Stockham 

Strang 

Stratton 

Syracuse 

Table Kock 

Valparaiso 

Wallace 

W'auneta 

Wilber 

Willard 

WMsner 

Wvmore 

Yankton, S. Dak 



Counties. 



Red Willow 

Rock 

Sarpy 

York 

York 

Pawnee — 

Thayer 

Gage 

Cherry 

Hitchcock . 
Howard . . . 
Nemaha . . . 
Howard — 

Holt 

Clay 

Fillmore . . . 
Sheridan. . . 

Dundy 

Hayes 

Lancaster . 

Dodge 

Brown 

Burt 

York 

Hamilton . . 

Cherry 

Platte 

Nemaha . . . 
Kearney . . . 

Valley 

Polk 

Dundy 

Merrick 

Otoe 

Cass 

Saline 

Howard ... 
Richardson 

Custer 

Colfax 



Rock 

Lancaster.. 
Hamilton . . 
Fillmore . .. 
Hitchcock . 

Otoe 

Pawnee — 
Saunders.. . 

Lincoln 

Chase 

Saline 

Lincoln 

Cuming — 
Gage 



Length 
of rec 
ord.yrs 



Total. 



0.63 
0.02 
2.23 
1.64 
1-55 
i-77 
1.05 
1-25 
T. 
2.52 



1.70 
1.05 
1.08 
2.00 
2.15 
o. 00 
0.80 



1.70 
1. 61 

T. 
2.10 
1.83 
1. 10 

T. 
1. 01 
2. 12 



0.56 

0.40 
0.66 
1-34 



1-56 
0.77 
2.40 



1.86 
1.36 
0-5" 
1-37 
0.90 
1.49 
0.85 
1.65 
2.71 



0.20 

1. 71 
0.25 

2-3' 
0.65 
1.27 



Depart- 
ure from 
normal 



+ 1.46 



-0.96 



-0-43 
-1.46 
-0.06 



-o-75 



-o-55 
-0.56 



-0.38 
-0.27 



-'■S 2 

-0.85 



No. 
rainy 
days. 



Observers. 



R.S.Baker. 

A. H. Gale. 

E.F.Stouffer. 

R.B. Brabham. 

E.C.Roggy. 

J. A.Kinsey. 

W.J.Kissick. 

F.W.Jones. 

C.M.Heinly. 

Mrs.L.A.Wibley. 

W.J.Melson. 

D.J.Wood. 

S.M.Wellman. 

G.H.Benson. 

M. L.. I ones. 

G.H.Borden. 

Amos Burwell. 

T.P.F. Haine. 

R.C.Orr. 

O.O.Franklin. 

T.W.Lyman. 

F.Avery. 

N.R.Kellam. 

F.S. Morris. 

John Ellis. 

F. Hussong. 
Wm. Webster. 
R.J. Duff. 
J.F.Barnes. 
Jas. Milford. 

G. W.Murbarger. 
Wm.Ough. 
E.H.Smith. 
W.D.Bancroft. 
W.Z.Pickett. 

J. W. Ingles. 

W.I. Meader. 

W.W.McDermet. 

J.S.Spooner. 

L.N.Dickinson. 

Weather Bureau. 

S.W. Spragg. 

S.W.Perin. 

J.W.Gray. 

S.Diller. 

C.W.Shurtliff. 

L.Howell. 

S.H.Dopp. 

W.J.Craven. 

A. E.Yocum. 

J.W.Hann. 

S.E.Davis. 

Wesley W.Lewis. 

N.C. Sears. 

H.B.Ware. 

W'eather Bureau. 



October, 1898. 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



Climatologrical data for Nebraska, October, 1898. 



Stations. 



NORTHEASTERN SEC. 

Agee * 

Blair 

Columbus 

Creighton 

Fremont 

Hartington 

Lynch* 

Madison 

Norfolk 

Oakdale 

Omaha 

O'Neill 

Santee Agency 

Stanton* 

Tekamah 

Wakefield 

VVestpoint 

Southeastern Sec. 

Arborville* 

Ashland 

Auburn * 

Aurora* 

Beatrice 

Crete 

David City 

Dawson * 

Edgar* 

Fairbury 

Geneva 

Harvard 

Hebron 

Lincoln 

Nebraska City 

Odell* 

Rulo* 

Seward* 

Superior* 

Tecumseh 

Turlington 

Weepingwater * ..... 

York* 

Central Sec. 

Albion 

Ansley 

Ashton* 

Brokenbow*. . • 

Burwell* 

Callaway 

Central City* 

Dunning* 

Ericson * 

Genoa 

Gothenburg 

Grand Island 

Greeley * 

Kearney* 

Lexington 

Loup* 

North Loup 

Kavenna 

St. Paul* 

Southwestern Sec 

Alma* 

Arapahoe* 

Beaver City 

Benkelman* 

Bluehill* 

Curtis 

Franklin 

Hastings* 

Holdrege* 

Imperial 

McCook* 

Madrid * 

Minden 

Redcloud * 

Republican* 

Wilsonville 

Western Sec. 

Camp Clarke 

Gering s 

Kimball 

Lodgepole 

Nesbit 

North Platte 

Seneca* 

Thedford * 

Whitman* 

Northwestern Sec. 

Alliance * 

Fort Robinson 

Hay Springs 

Kennedy. 

Kirkwood * 

Springview 

Valentine 



Counties. 



Holt 

Washington. 

Platte 

Knox 

Dodge 

Cedar 

Boyd 

Madison — 

...do 

Antelope — 

Douglas 

Holt 

Knox 

Stanton 

Burt 

Dixon 

Cuming 



York 

Saunders 

Nemaha 

Hamilton ... 

Gage 

Saline 

Butler 

Richardson . 

Clay 

Jefferson 

Fillmore — 

Clay 

Thayer 

Lancaster... 

Otoe 

Gage 

Richardson . 

Seward 

Nuckolls 

Johnson — 

Otoe ..- 

Cass 

York 



Boone — 
Custer . . . 
Sherman . 
Custer . . . 
Garfield .. 
Custer . . . 
Merrick .. 

Blaine 

Wheeler.. 
Platte 
Dawson . . 

Hall 

Greeley . . 
Buffalo... 
Dawson . . 
Sherman . 
Valley ... 
Buffalo... 
Howard.. 



Harlan 

Furnas 

...do 

Dundy 

Webster 

Frontier 

Franklin 

Adams 

Phelps 

Chase 

Red Willow. 

Perkins 

Kearney — 
Webster — 

Harlan 

Furnas 



Cheyenne . . . 
Scotts Bluff. 
Kimball .... 
Cheyenne ... 

Logan 

Lincoln 

Thomas 

...do 

Grant 



Box Butte . 

Dawes 

Sheridan ... 

Cherry 

Rock 

Keya Paha. 
Cherry 



1,442 
1,600 
1,203 
'.3°9 



1.585 
1.532 
1,722 
1,103 
'.975 



i,472 
1,060 
i,3«7 
1,313 



1, 100 
1,051 
1,792 
1,235 
i,3°S 
1,619 

945 
1,722 
1,316 
1.633 
1,812 
1,458 
1,199 

941 
1,278 

842 
1,435 
1,574 
l,H3 
1,214 
1,080 
1,642 

1,747 
2,307 
2,061 
2,477 
2,180 
2,555 
1,708 
2,621 
2,029 
1,584 
2, 557 
1,860 
2,010 
2, 146 
2,385 
2,067 
1,961 
2,028 
1,796 

'.939 
2,173 
2,147 
2,968 
1,967 
2,553 
1,820 
1,932 
2,324 
3,278 
2,506 
3.294 
2, 169 
1,687 
1,939 



3,7oo 



4,697 
3,820 



2,841 
2,971 
2,842 
3,588 

3,968 
3,764 
3,821 



2,613 



Temperature, in degrees Fahrenheit. 






44-9 

48.4 
47-9 
45-2 
47-8 
45-2 
44-5 
46.8' 
47.2 

45-1 
50.0 



46.0 
47-1 
48.9 
47-4 
48.9 

45-0 
5°-3 
51-3 
47-0 
49- o 
50.8 
46.0 

52.7 
48.8 
49-8' 
47-9 
48.2 

50.3 
49.8 
5o.7 
49-8 
51-6 
47-9 
49-0 
53 -o 
50.2 
46.8 
47-b 

47. o' 

44.8 
47-5 
45- o 



45-7 
48.8 



44.8 
47-9 
45-4 
46.4 



49.8 
47-0 
46.0 



49.8 



49-3 
48.0 
48.6 
48.7 
49- 6' 1 
47-9 



48.6 



46.8 
47-7 
49-4 
44-3 
48.0 

45-1 
42.6™ 
45-6 
45-5' 
45-1 
47-0 
43-7 
46. 1 
43-5 

39-6 

43-9 
46.4 
44.8 
44.0' 
47-2 
46.0 



g 



-4-3 

-3-5 
-1.8 
-3-1 
-3-7 
-3-2 



-3-2 
-2.9 



-5-° 
-3-2 
-3-3 



-7.8 
-4.4 
-4.0 



-5-o 
-2.0 
-2.6 



—2-7 
—3-0 
—4-3 



-6.7 

—5-2 
—I. I 
—3-3 

-3-7 
—7.0 



-3-6 
-3-4 



-5-0 
-1-7 



-3-7 
-5-5 



-2. 1 
-3-2 



-2.6 

-4-4 



—2.1 

—3-7 



-7-3 
-3-1 



-5-0 
-3-0 



—5-1 
+0.2 
—3-7 



-2.6 
-3-2 



83 



*5 



26t 



30 



5" 



53 



Precipitation, in inches. 



0?. 



c o 
►J 





3 




. 6 




5 


45 


15 


49 


12 


49 


9 




2 



1.88 
2-93 
1-52 
1-97 
2.05 
2.30 
o.79 
1.24 
0.86 
I- IS 
2-54 



3.83 
1.62 
2.60 
1. 71 
0.80 

1.86 
1-53 
2.14 

i-53 
1. 16 
1.44 
1.65 
2.29 



1.89 
2.14 
1.62 
1. 12 
1-55 
o.97 
1.20 
2.20 
2.09 
0.80 



1.04 
2.72 
1.20 

°-5' 

1.08 
0-57 
3-90 

°T 56 
0.70 



0.35 
1 -13 
1-03 

V 2 

0.65 
0.73 

0.42 

0.53 

0.56 

0.45 
0.25 

0.50 

0.32 

1-13 
1.67 
0-33 
2.10 
1.82 

0-73 
0.30 
0.44 
T. 
1.04 
0.84 



o.35 

0.07 
0-57 
0.65 
0.10 
0.14 
0.07 
0.00 
0.20 
o.'io 

T. 

o-33 
0.25 
0.30 
o. 19 



0.09 



•S 

a 5 



+0.47 



— 0.06 
+0.81 
— 0.20 
+0.91 
-0.58 
—0.44 
—0.49 
—0.08 
+0.04 



+2.56 
+0.20 
+0.92 



-0.67 

-0.14 
-0.61 

-o. 52 
-o. 14 
-1-33 
-0.63 
-0.38 
-I-3I 



-0.47 
-0.27 
-o. 85 
-o. 82 
-o-33 
-1-99 



0.00 

— 1-33 

— 1. 14 
—2.26 
+ 0.24 
— 0.46 



-0.52 
-1-43 



-1.3" 

-0.49 

-0-93 
-0.83 



-'•25 
-0.57 



-1.07 
-1.02 



-1. 01 
0.00 



—1. 71 
+0.45 
—0.68 
—0.91 
—0.79 



-0.87 
-1. 01 
-0.80 



+0.01 
+0. 10 



-1-53 
-0.91 



— 0.69 

—0.32 
— 1.02 
—0.81 
— 1.03 



0.56 
1. 00 
1. 12 
1.22 
1.08 
"•05 
0.65 
0.43 
0.44 
0.52 
0.76 



3-36 
1. 01 
1.40 
0.50 
0.49 

1.65 
o.73 
0.56 
1-45 
0.95 
0.68 
1 .00 
1. 10 



"•55 
1.56 
1.45 
0,6,1 
0-54 
0.32 
0.63 
0.90 
1.65 
0.60 
0-75 
0.57 
1.40 
1.20 

0.28 
0.78 
0-37 
3-90 
0.48 
T. 
0.48 



0.35 
0.62 
103 

°t" 

0.65 
0.50 
o. 19 
0.25 
0.32 
0.30 

0.25 
0.38 
0.13 
0.92 
1.63 
0.15 
2.00 
1-43 
0-73 
o. 20 
0.44 
T. 
0.74 
0.84 



0.30 

0.05 
0.30 

0.35 
o. 10 
0.08 
0.04 
0.00 
0.20 
o. 10 

T. 

o.33 
0.25 
0.20 
o. 10 



0.06 



te'O 

o2 



7.0 

5-° 
T. 



6-5 

17-5 

1.0 

3-0 
4-5 
5-2 



4.0 

3-o 
4.0 

II. o 

2.5 

T. 

10.0 

7-5 
0.2 
2.0 
2.8 
4.0 



1.0 

3.0 

T. 

°-5 

5-2 

1.8 



9.0 
2.0 



2.0 

4-7 
10. o 



3-0 



T. 
T. 
T. 
0.0 



T- 7 
T. 



1.0 

T. 

T. 

1.0 

T. 

0.0 

1.0 

T." 



T. 



1-5 
T. 
T. 
0.0 



0.5 

0.0 
T. 
3-o 
1.0 

T. 



0.0 

1.0 

T. 
3-3 



2-5 
1.0 



T, 



.o-o 

E 
9 



Sky. 



,QT3 
B 



£13 



.ST3 



nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

n. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 



nw. 
nw. 



w. 

nw. 
n. 

sw. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

n. 

se. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 



n. 

nw. 
nw. 
nw. 

sw. 



w. 

nw. 
nw. 
n. 



nw. 
nw. 
nw. 

n. 

nw. 

nw. 



nw. 

nw. 
nw. 
n. 

s. 

n. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

sw. 



ne. 
nw. 



11 



nw. 

sw. 

nw. 

ne. 

nw. 

n. 

n. 



nw. 



nw. 
nw. 
nw. 
nw. 
ne. 

nw. 
nw. 



nw. 
nw. 



Observers. 



R.E.Bowden. 

E. A. Palmer. 
C.C.Gray. 

Dr. Geo. Roberts. 

Wm. J. Phillips. 

T. B.A.Watson. 

C.C.Irwin. 

Dr. F.A.Long. 

Dr. P. H.Salter. 

G.S.Clingman. 

U. S. Weather Bureau. 

O.M.Collins. 

W.H.Hamlin. 

W.Gerecke. 

Dr. A. D. Nesbit. 

I. H. Weaver. 

C.J.Kadish. 

E.D.Smith. 

Dr. A. S. v Mansfelde. 

G.D.Carrington. 

H.C.Miller. 

C.Kellam. 

Doane College. 

E.B.Taylor. 

M.L.Libbee. 

J.W.Hoberg. 

W.F.Cramb. 

F.M.Flory. 

Dr. J. T.Fleming. 

Dr. C.M.Easton. 

U. S. Weather Bureau. 

E.Morton. 

W.F.Denton. 

W.F.Gingrich. 

L.E.Ost. 

L.W.Hahn. 

C.M.Miller. 

Wm.N. Hunter. 

G. Treat. 

O.P.Lowry. 

F. A.Pettinger. 
Chas.R.Hare. 
F. Rein. 
H.L.Ormsby. 
W.S.Green. 
Geo.B.Mair. 
J. A.McRae. 
E.E.Bolelaek. 
A.Dahl. 

Geo. S.Truman. 
A. V.Carlson. 
E.Corbin. 
J.A.Pinkerton. 
C.E.Magner. 
Ira P.Griswold. 
E.S.Hayhurst. 
J.E.Goodrich. 
Erastus Smith. 
Paul Anderson. 

R.E. Pitcher. 
J F.Edwards. 
C.G.George. 
W.E. Winger. 
C.S. Draper. 
Dr. S.R. Razee. 
F.T.Owen. 
J.C.Swarts. 

C. Engstrom. 
Robert Malcolm. 
C.T.Watson. 
John McKenzie. 
Joel Hull. 
W.K.Hayes. 
W.Burdon. 

D. F. Hostetter. 

Robt.H. Willis. 

J.P.Finley. 

F.J. Bellows. 

A.B.Persinger. 

G.E.Bolkrom. 

U. S. Weather Bureau. 

D.McNall. 

O.G.Norton. 

F.D.Gallup. 

J.W.Wollich* 
Post surgeon. 

C. A. Waterman. 

D. A.Piercy. 
Mrs.C. A. Arter. 
Miss Ezada Phelps. 
U.S. Weather Bureau. 



* Temperature data from thermometers not self registering t Occurred on more than one day. *, \ c , etc., indicate number of days missing from observed readings. 
All records are used in determining State or district means, but State and district departures are determined by comparison of current data of only stations with normals. 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



October, 1808. 



z a 
eg 



"I IV 



l/v CTt (J\ [s * 



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r* d on w. onc ic f' 



On r~00 NO O NO IT. ■»*-■* NO On i/".nO OO 00 



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ir. r- r~ o oo no i 



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> « ro NO OnO «( 

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iT.nO u")nO nO no w.nO 



rsw Cf^ 



QNNO — 00 



On On ^.00 rn 



) On -Nt- N I 
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rOt^-Nft^ » l'. On r^ On ir.inOO 



2=2 8. 



«-0 i^-N >Q i/) 



oo goo in« 



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r-NO wj no no o ".oo 



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CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



October, 1898. 















Daily precipitation for Neb 


ras 


ttt, 


October, 1898 




























Stations. 


Day of month. 




i. 


2. 


3- 


4- 


5. 


6. 


7- 


8. 


9- 


10. 


11. 


12. 


13- 


14. 


15- 


16. 


17- 


18. 


19- 


20. 


21. 


22. 


23- 


24- 


25. 


26. 


27- 


28. 


29. 


3°- 


3<- 


3 
a 






















.56 

.28 
t 

.78 
.38 


t 










■5° 


t 


t 


• 50 


•30 
.12 


t 


t 
















.02 






1.88 
0.5' 
t 


















. 11 


































































t 
























. 10 




















.20 














































. 12 












































0. so 
1.86 
'•53 
2.14 
'•53 
1 16 
















.10 

.08 
•°3 
.06 


..65 
■45 
•35 

'■45 
• 96 
•'3 












.08 
.19 

■51 


•°3 
■73 
•5° 

t 


t 

.08 
.56 
.02 


t 


t 
t 


t 


t 




t 
t 


















t 














■<>5 






















































.14 








































+ 


















































.20 
.04 
































.01 






.04 




•92 


























. 10 

. II 
















0.32 
'•'3 
2-93 
1.67 
3- 90 
0.56 
■)■ 


















.10 


































t 




.02 

t 








.04 


.81 




.02 


.01 




t 


.28 


■59 


1. 00 


t 
t 
t 


.01 


t 












■15 










t 




.04 




+ 


















3-9° 
.48 
t 










































































t 


















.08 












































































t 
t 










• 05 
















.02 
t 




















0.07 
'•52 
1.97 
1.44 
2.52 
o-33 
1.65 












t 




.08 


'■67 

t 

2- '5 

• 05 


1. 12 












.02 


.22 
1.22 
.02 




.06 


.02 




















































.08 










1 












.06 




.68 




t 








• 41 


.20 




t 


t 






.01 

• 25 

•'5 

+ 


.06 




























. 12 

t 






















+ 

t 




•13 


t 




















































1. 00 




t 






•15 




•5° 




t 












































































































































•35 
1-55 


















t 




















t 








°-35 
1.89 

2-15 

0.33 

2.10 
2.05 

2.14 

i-'3 
0-57 
i-°3 
1-32 
t 
2.30 
1.62 
1.82 














t 


•■5 




1.50 












•'5 


•34 






































•05 












•3" 
•33 








































t 


t 










































2. OO 
1.08 












.10 
•17 
.20 

■°7 










































.08 


t 
1.56 
. 11 
t 
1.03 
•32 












■47 
t 
.08 


•15 
.20 






















. 10 










t 








. 12 


t 
.12 












t 
•°5 










.06 






















.62 










.02 














.06 




























■ 27 

t 








•3° 

t 




















t 


.01 




t 


.08 


t 
















































•9' 

+ 

•32 
•57 










t 


+ 


t 


t 


t 
































t 
.01 








































t 
















•°5 
. 10 
.06 


"t" 


'•°5 

t 
t 


.60 


. 10 

+ 


•°5 
















. 12 














.01 




.06 

t 


•33 


.88 
1-43 












t 






















































































































t 
.61 












t 


■27 
•35 


t 

■13 
•3° 














•25 
.11 
















0.25 














t 






















































•75 












•3° 


























1.70 

o.73 
0.30 
0.65 
0.30 
0.65 
0. 19 
0.73 
'•55 




















•73 












































.10 
























t 
















.20 


































.65 






































































•°5 




•°5 












.20 
•30 

t 
•13 
•03 
.10 














































•35 
•°3 


















t 

.02 


























.02 
■5° 

t 


.02 












t 


.10 


t 


t 
































.10 


.08 










































•54 




.01 








•29 


•47 


•°5 




.01 


t 






.07 






t 


t 
























t 
















.02 




•°5 
•65 
.16 
•43 


•19 

t 
1.56 
•42 










.16 






















t 
t 
t 
t 








0.42 
0.79 
























.02 


■°5 


.04 
•38 
•25 


t 


t 
t 
+ 
















.03 














t 
t 


































t 










t 
















• 14 






















1.24 

t 






















t 
+ 








































• 44 




t 
































0.44 










t 






.08 

■ 14 


t 


.26 
.02 
•°9 


.60 

•74 
.22 




t 


.11 
.12 
•32 


..„ 
.18 


•°5 

t 
t 


















t 


t 




















1. 91 


t 
t 








.02 

•03 








1.04 
0-97 




■<=9 




































.04 


















.21 












































.08 
t 

•25 
.01 

•5° 












.06 








t 
t 
t 








t 
















0. 14 
0.85 










t 










•44 










•°5 
.04 




■32 

t 


•°5 


t 


t 


























t 




t 


•'5 










•>3 












t 








0-53 
0.07 

I. '5 


North Platte 








t 


















.02 








































.07 


•25 
.64 


•52 
•15 

• 14 


. 10 


.02 














.04 








Odell 




t 

t 














•63 
.76 


















.07 
• 05 














t 










.02 




. 11 




t 








•44 


t 














t 


.38 






2.54 








































t 




t 

•3° 
.38 
•32 
.84 


1. 41 














.10 


.20 




























1. 71 






































.10 


























. 10 




.08 


.18 












































0.66 






















•'5 






t 




.01 
















t 








0.56 
0.84 












































































































Rulo 


•05 


















•35 












.90 
■°7 
•05 


.40 
'•°5 


.20 
t 
.20 














■ 30 














2.20 
0-45 
2.40 
3.83 














.08 
■15 




•30 
.40 
1.30 














+ 






























.40 
.01 
























•15 
























2.06 










.08 


.38 
















t 






































































•°3 




.02 






■75 














■°3 


1. 00 






















•03 






1 86 




























































•°9 




1.65 














•15 


.20 






























2.09 
































































.08 










1. 01 
1. 18 






.08 








t 

.18 
.20 
.20 
.20 
• 17 


■°5 


■35 




















. 10 








1 62 














.08 








t 












t 














1.49 
















.60 

1.40 
.28 

t 






















































.02 




•°3 

+ 
t 








•5° 
.40 


•75 
.40 
.07 




























1. 48 


"t" 


• 05 

t 

+ 
.20 


























t 












.09 
















■03 
.06 








t 

t 








1.04 
0.09 
1. 61 


















•°3 








t 






t 
.11 
.06 
























.40 
•05 








■5° 
•25 


.40 
.40 

t 












.01 










.04 




.46 
■49 


.01 


t 








•75 

t 


















2.72 
0.80 




t 




t 














t 


t 












t 


t 
























. 10 


























•°5 


1-35 


















.21 


.10 


t 


























1.71 
o.35 
















•3° 
1.20 
























• 05 
















York 





























































































































Trace (when precipitation is less than o.oi of an inch). 



N 


II K ' 

UNIVE f 


V.y" 






U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. 




REPORT FOR NOVEMBER. 1898. 



NEBRASKA SECTION 



OF THE 



CLIMATE AND CROP SERVICE 



OF THE 



WEATHER BUREAU. 



PUBLISHED BY AUTHORITY OF THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE. 



UNDER DIRECTION OF 

WILLIS L. MOORE 

CHIEF OF WEATHER BUREAU 



BY 

G. A. bOVEhAN'D. 

SECTION DIRECTOR, 

Office, University of Nebraska, Lincoln. 




NiitUiUi H»: 



X 
X 



X 



2; 

C 
v 

32 

Q 



O 



z 
<: 

X 



c 

x 



X 

o 




November, 1898. 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



3 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, 

Climate and Crop Service 



WEATHHR BUREAU. 



CENTRAL OFFICE: WASHINGTON, D. C. 



NEBRASKA SECTION, 
G. A. LOVELAND, Section Director, 

LINCOLN, NF.1SK. 



Vol. III. 



LINCOLN, NEBR. 



No. 11. 



A STUDY OF SNOW CRYSTALS. 

The following extracts are taken from an article in Apple- 
ton.s' Popular Science Monthly for May, 1898. It is regretted 
that it is impossible to reproduce the excellent cuts of snow 
crystals used to illustrate the article: 

" Many have admired snowflakes as they observed their 
exquisite outlines and varied forms, but few have ever given 
them careful study or distinguished the crystals of which a 
flake is usually composed. 

"Extended examination of snow crystals has hitherto 
been very difficult because, except in a very uncomfortable 
atmosphere, the delicate structures speedily disappeared, and 
their outlines could be preserved for study aud comparison 
only by the aid of skillfully executed drawings. Even these 
must often be hastily made, and could show little of the 
internal structure which is so important a feature of most 
snow crystals. 

" Now, however, by any of the usual combinations of 
microscope and camera, these crystals can be easily and 
quickly photographed, and far more satisfactory represen- 
tations obtained than were possible formerly. The term 
snow crystal is used because a snowflake may be a crystal 
or it may be, and usually is, a cluster of crystals. 

" Perfect crystals are by no means always common in snow 
storms, most of the forms produced being more or less un- 
symmetrical or otherwise imperfect. It rarely happens that 
during a single winter there are more than a dozen good 
opportunities for securing complete crystals, and there may 
not be half so many. The greater number of perfect crystals 
is found in widespread storms, or blizzards, while the local 
storms produce most often granular or imperfect forms. So 
marked is this distinction that very often the character and 
extent of a storm may be in general determined by an exam- 
ination of the crystalline forms obtained. Extensive storms 
produce smaller crystals, more uniform in size, less clustered 
in flakes, and in greater variety than local storms. When 
the temperature is very low while a local storm is raging, 
its crystals resemble those of the blizzard more closely. 

" Some forms are common to both classes of storms. 
Probably because identical conditions do not occur fre- 
quently, the crystalline forms of each storm during a win- 
ter may differ from each other, one type appearing abun- 
dantly in one storm, a different type in the next, and so on. 
Conversely, the types most common in a given storm may 



reappear after an interval of months or years — as, for exam- 
ple, those obtained during the great blizzard of March, 1888, 
were repeated in the storms of February 16, 1892, aud March 
3, 1890, and most of these were of forms such as are found 
in general storms, while unusual types occurred in the 
storms of February 24, 1893, and February 13, 1894. 

"Not only do different storms afford different types of 
crystals, but different parts of the same storm, if it be gen- 
eral, give different forms. In this region, the northern and 
western portions of the storm area produce more perfect 
crystals than the southern and eastern, and from this we 
infer a difference in the atmospheric conditions in these 
portions, the former being more quiet and otherwise favor- 
able to crystallization. 

" It is well known that crystals which form in a low tem- 
perature are smaller and more compact than those formed 
in a warmer atmosphere. As the higher cloud strata are 
colder than those nearer the earth, the snow crystals which 
originate there are smaller and less branched than those 
from lower clouds. The small, compact crystals of the 
upper clouds do not always remain of their original form 
or size, for, as they fall through layer after layer of clouds, 
each layer subjecting them to its own special conditions, they 
may be greatly modified, and by the time they reach the 
earth they may closely resemble the crystals from lower 
clouds, though they can usually be distinguished from them 
by an examination of the internal structure, as well as by, 
in some cases, their general form. All crystals falling from 
high cloud strata, the cirrus or cirro-stratus, are not changed: 
especially is this true in a great storm, or when the temper- 
ature of the lower clouds is low, and in any case some are 
much more completely transformed than others. One crys- 
tal may pass through cloud layers not very unlike that from 
which it came, and of course will not be greatly changed. 
Another may encounter here a quiet cloud layer and there a 
tumultuous layer, here a lower, there a higher temperature, 
here a dense and there a thin cloud mass, and by all of these 
conditions may be affected. 

"Total transformation, such as the change of one type 
into another, does not often occur. The nucleus retains its 
original form, to which various additions are made during 
the downward passage. Composite crystals may, however, 
be formed during the passage through diverse cloud layers, 
though they are not common. Usually, however, the tabu- 
lar, compact, small crystals of the high clouds continue 
their development at lower levels upon the original plan, 
though becoming larger and more complex by the addition 
of branches at the angles. The triangular forms are less 
common than the others, and occur usually in the greater 
storms.'" 

The first twenty days of November were dry, with the 
temperature above the normal on nearly every day. These 
conditions were favorable for the advancement of the farm 
work of the fall season. The severe wind and snow storm 
of the 21st and 22d, followed by low temperature, interfered 
with farm work, and to some extent damaged corn that re- 
mained in the field. 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



November, 1898. 



COMPARISON OF PAST NOVEMBERS. 

The monthly maximum and minimum temperatures for several sta- 
tions have been obtained for the years 1870 to 1888, and the following 
table has been revised, and differs slightly from the comparative tables 
previously published : 

^Temperature.-^ 
Mean. Max. Min. Pree. 



.—Temperature.-^ 
Mean. Max. Min. Prec. 



1876 3' -7 79 

1877 32.8 68 

1878 39-4 75 

1879 35.4 76 

1880 23.2 71 

1881 33.5 67 

18S2 35.5 74 

1SS3 37.1 

1884 36-7 73 

1885 38.8 74 

1886 32.3 91 

1887 35-7 87 

188S 35.1 80 



— 10 
17 

— 2 
—25 

— 5 
o 

— 5 



— 5 
—32 

— 3 



1.68 
0.82 
0.64 
i-3' 
0.53 
0.87 
o-45 
0.24 
o. 16 
1. 18 
1.24 
0.61 
0.22 



1889 32.9 

1890 38.9 

1891 34.2 

1892 36.6 

■ 893 34-5 

1894 38.0 

1895 34-8 

1896 26.1 

1897 34-9 

1898 3i-4 

Average for the 

State for past 

23 years 31.3 



75 
79 

ss 

85 
92 

88 
82 
85 



80 



— 10 
o 

— 13 
— 22 

— 16 
—15 



0.86 
0.87 
0.32 
0.27 
o-33 
°-'3 
0.94 
1.21 
0.51 
0-57 



0.69 



CLIMATOLOGY OF THE MONTH. 

General characteristics: The month was characterized by 
low temperature and deficient precipitation. The first days 
of the month were the warmest and the 21st and 22d were 
generally the coldest days, but the cold period, with mini- 
mum temperatures near zero, lasted from the 21st to the 
27th. A severe storm occurred on the 21st, with high wind, 
snow, and rapidly falling temperature. The daily range 
of temperature exceeded 60° at many stations on the 21st 
or 22d. Ice formed on the Missouri River at Lynch and 
Santee Agency on the 21st of sufficient thickness to support 
a person, and teams crossed the river at Santee Agency on 
the 26th. 

Atmospheric pressure: The mean pressure was 30.08 inches, 
which is 0.07 of an inch below the normal for November. 
The highest during the month was 30.59 inches, at North 
Platte on the 9th, and the lowest, 29.45 inches, at Lincoln 
on the 20th. 

Temperature: The mean temperature for the State, as de- 
termined from the records of 101 stations, was 31.4°, which 
is about 3.0° below the average of the past twenty-three 
years. The highest temperature was 81°, at Lynch on the 
4th, and the lowest, 15° below zero, at Valentine on the 22d. 

Wind: The prevailing direction of the wind was from the 
northwest. The average velocity was 8.9 miles an hour, 
which is about 1 mile above the normal. The highest 
velocity was 48 miles an hour, at Lincoln on the 22d, from 
the northwest. 

Precipitation: The average precipitation for the State, as de- 
termined from the records of 130 stations, was 0.57 of an 
inch, which is about one-tenth of an inch below the average 
of the past twenty-three years. The largest precipitation 
reported at anyone station was 1.60 inches, at Kimball, and 
the least, trace, at several southwestern stations. The pre- 
cipitation for the first eleven months of the year was 90 per 
cent of the normal. 

Snowfall: Most of the snow fell in the storms of the 21st 
and 27th and was quite evenly distributed in the State, but 
was slightly less in the southwestern counties than else- 
where. The average snowfall (in inches) for the several 
sections was as follows: Southeastern, 6.6; northeastern, 
5.8; central, 7.1; southwestern, 5.5; western, 6.8; north- 



western, 4.9; average snowfall for the State, 6.1. This is 
the largest snowfall recorded in the eastern sections of the 
State for the month of November during the past twenty 
years. In the central and western sections the snowfall for 
November has several times been larger than it was this year. 

Wind and humidity table. 



Stations. 



Lincoln 

North Platte 
Omaha 



Wind. 



Miles. Mean. Max. Dir. Date. 



8,887 
6.637 
6,180 



12.3 
9.2 

8.6 



Humidity. 



66.4 
67-5 



Low- 



Means for the six equal sections of the State. 



Sections. 



Southeastern . 
Northeastern. 

Central 

Southwestern 

Western 

Northwestern 

State 



Temperature. 



Mean. 



34-4 
3i- 1 
3°-9 
32.5 
3°-3 
28.9 

3i-4 



Aver- 
age.* 



37-1 
34-8 
34-3 
36.6 

35-5 
33-3 

35-3 



Precipitation. 



Mean. 



0-73 
0.60 

0.51 
o-53 
0.66 
0.38 

o-57 



Aver- 

age.t 



1.02 
0.86 
o-53 
0.58 
o-34 
0-57 
0.65 



Number of days- 



Rainy. Clear. ^^ Cloudy. 



7-9 



5-6 

6.1 
6.5 
6.8 

5-7 
5-o 
6.0 



* For ten years. t For twenty years. 

Supplemental precipitation table. 



Stations. 



Bartley 

Bassett 

Bellevue 

Benedict 

Bradshaw 

Burchard 

Chester 

Clatonia 

Cody 

Culbertson 

Dannebrog 

Eden 

Elba 

Ewing 

Fairfield 

Fairmont 

Gordon 

Haigler 

Hayes Center. .. 

Hickman 

Hooper 

Johnstown 

Lyons 

McCool Junct. . . 

Marquette 

Merriman 

Monroe 

Nemaha 

Norman 

Ord 

Osceola 

Ough 

Palmer 

Palmyra 

Plattsmouth 

Pleasanthill 

St. Libory 

Salem 

Sargent 

Schuyler 

Sioux City, Iowa 

Spragg 

State Farm 

Stoekham 

Strang 

Stratton 

Syracuse 

Table Rock 

Valparaiso 

Wallace 

Wauneta 

Wilber 

Willard 

Wisner 

Wymore 

Yankton, S. Dak 



Counties. 



Red Willow 

Rock 

Sarpy 

York 

York 

Pawnee — 

Thayer 

Gage 

Cherry 

Hitchcock . 
Howard . 
Nemaha . .. 
Howard — 

Holt 

Clay 

Fillmore . . . 
Sheridan . . . 

Dundy 

Hayes 

Lancaster . 

Dodge 

Brown 

Burt 

York 

Hamilton .. 

Cherry 

Platte 

Nemaha . . . 
Kearney ... 

Valley 

Polk 

Dundy 

Merrick 

Otoe 

Cass 

Saline 

Howard . .. 
Richardson 

Custer 

Colfax 



Rock 

Lancaster. . 
Hamilton . . 
Fillmore ... 
Hitchcock . 

Otoe 

Pawnee 

Saunders.. . 

Lincoln 

Chase 

Saline — .*. 

Lincoln 

Cuming 

Gage 



Length 
of rec- 
orders 



Total. 



0.25 
0.83 
0.90 
0.25 
0.60 
0.24 



T. 

o-37 



0.60 
0.30 
0.70 
0.85 
0-55 



T. 

0.60 
0.50 
0.68 
0.15 
0.91 
0.50 
0.90 

°-55 
0.42 
1.02 



0.27 

0-55 
0.30 

o.35 
0.70 
1.28 
0.70 
0.50 
1. 00 



0.50 
o-45 

0. 2U 



0.27 
O.70 
O.29 
O.85 
O.96 
0.45 



O.74 
0.43 



1.40 
O.25 



Depart 

ure from 

normal. 



—0-59 
— 0.22 



—0.15 
—0.63 



+0. 10 
—0.13 



+0.38 
+0.09 



—0-57 
+0.04 
—0.15 



+ 0.25 



+ 0. 12 
—0-34 
—0.74 
—0.44 



-0.44 
-0.44 



+0.04 
— 0. 56 



No. 
rainy 
days. 



Observers. 



R.S.Baker. 

A. H. Gale. 

E.F.Stouffer. 

R. B. Brabham. 

E.C.Roggy. 

J. A.Kinsey. 

W.J .Kissick. 

F.W.Jones. 

C.M.Heinly. 

Mrs.L. A. Wibley. 

W.J.Melson. 

D.J.Wood. 

S.M.Wellman. 

G.H.Benson. 

M. L.Jones. 

G.H.Borden. 

Amos Burwell. 

T.P.F. Haine. 

R.C.Orr. 

O.O.Franklin. 

T.W.Lyman. 

F.Avery. 

N.R.Kellam. 

F.S.Morris. 

John Ellis. 

F. Hussong. 

Wm. Webster. 

R.J. Duff. 

J.F.Barnes. 

Jas. Milford. 

G.W.Murbarger. 

Wm.Ough. 

E.H.Smith. 

W.D.Bancroft. 

W.Z.Pickett. 

J. W. Ingles. 

W.I.Meader. 

W.W.McDermet. 

J.S.Spooner. 

L.N.Dickinson. 

Weather Bureau. 

S.W. Spragg. 

S.W.Perin. 

J.W.Gray. 

S.Diller. 

C.W.Shurtliff. 

L.Howell. 

S.H.Dopp. 

W.J.Craven. 

A.E.Yocum. 

J.W.Hann. 

S.E.Davis. 

Wesley W.Lewis. 

N.C. Sears. 

H.B.Ware. 

Weather Bureau. 



November, 1898. 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



Climatological data for Nebraska, November, 1808. 



Stations. 



Northeastern Sec 

Agee * 

Blair 

Columbus 

Creighton 

Fremont 

Hartington 

Lynch* 

Madison 

Norfolk 

Oakdale 

Omaha 

O'Neill J 

Santee Agency 

Stanton* 

Tekamah 

Wakefield 

VVestpoint 

Southeastern Sec. 

Arborville* 

Ashland 

Auburn * 

Aurora* 

Beatrice 

Crete 

David City 

Dawson * 

Edgar* 

Fairbury 

Geneva 

Harvard 

Hebron 

Lincoln 

Nebraska City 

Odell* 

Rulo* 

Seward * 

Superior* 

Tecumseh 

Turlington 

Weepingwater * 

York- 

Central Sec 

Albion 

Ansley 

Ashtou* 

Broken bow* 

Burwell* 

Callaway 

Central City * 

Dunning* 

Ericson * 

Genoa 

Gothenburg 

Grand Island 

Greeley * 

Kearney* 

Lexington 

Loup* 

North Loup 

Kavenna 

St. Paul* 

Southwestern Sec. 

Alma * 

Arapahoe* 

Beaver City 

Benkelman* 

Bluehill* 

Curtis 

Franklin 

Hastings* 

Holdrege* 

Imperial 

McCook * 

Madrid * 

Minden 

Redcloud* 

Republican * 

Wilsonville 

Western Sec. 

Camp Clarke 

tiering ' 

Kimball 

Lodgepole 

Nesbit 

North Platte 

Seneca* 

Thedford* 

Whitman* 

Northwestern Sec. 

Alliance * 

Fort Robinson 

Hay Springs 

Kennedy 

Kirkwood * 

Springview 

Valentine 



Counties. 



Holt 

Washington. 

Platte 

Knox 

Dodge 

Cedar 

Boyd 

Madison 

...do 

Antelope — 

Douglas 

Holt. 

Knox 

Stanton 

Burt 

Dixon 

Cuming 



York 

Saunders 

Nemaha 

Hamilton ... 

Gage 

Saline 

Butler 

Richardson . 

Clay 

Jefferson 

Fillmore — 

Clay 

Thayer 

Lancaster... 

Otoe 

Gage 

Richardson . 

Seward 

Nuckolls 

Johnson 

Otoe 

Cass 

York 



Boone — 
Custer . . . 
Sherman . 
Custer . . . 
Garfield .. 
Custer . . . 
Merrick . . 

Blaine 

Wheeler.. 
Platte.... 
Dawson . . 

Hall 

Greeley .. 
Buffalo... 
Dawson . . 
Sherman . 
Valley . . . 
Buffalo... 
Howard. . 



Harlan 

Furnas 

...do 

Dundy 

Webster 

Frontier 

Franklin 

Adams 

Phelps 

Chase 

Red Willow. 

Perkins 

Kearney 

Webster 

Harlan 

Furnas 



1,442 
1,600 
1,203 
1.309 



1,585 
1,532 
1,722 
1,103 
1,975 



1,472 
1,060 
1,387 
I,3'3 



Cheyenne . . . 
Scotts Bluff. 
Kimball 
Cheyenne . . . 

Logan 

Lincoln 

Thomas 

...do 

Grant 



Box Butte . 

Dawes 

Sheridan . . . 

Cherry 

Rock 

Keya Paha. 
Cherry 



1,100 

1,051 
1,792 
1,235 
i,36S 
1,619 

945 
1,722 

1,316 
■,633 
1,812 
1,458 
','99 

94 1 
1,278 

842 
',435 
1,574 
1,113 
1,214 
1,080 
1,642 

1,747 
2,307 
2,061 

2,477 
2,180 
2,555 
1,708 
2,621 
2,029 
1,584 
2, 557 
1,860 
2,010 
2, 146 
2,385 
2,067 
1,961 
2,028 
1,796 

1,939 
2,173 
2,147 
2,968 
1,967 
2,553 
1,820 
1,932 
2,324 
3,278 
2,506 
3,294 
2, 169 
1,687 
1,939 



3,700 



4,697 
3,820 



2,841 
2,971 
2,842 
3,588 

3,968 
3,764 
3,821 



2,613 



Temperature, in degrees Fahrenheit. 



L l - 

B O 



29.7 
33-7 
32.7 
29.4 
31-2 
30.8 
29.2 
31.8 
30.4 
29.2 

35-2 
26.0 
30.8 
32.0 
32.5 
31-3 
33-6 

34-2 
34.o 
35-0 
33-0 
32.5 
34-4 
32.0 
38.0 



33-3 
32.9 
32.6 
35-0 
34-3 
37-9 
34-6 
37-4 
32.9 
34-7 
37-8 
34-3 
3°-4 
32.7 

25-4 
25.0 
3>-2 
29.8 



28.8 
31-2 

29.8 
30.3 
32.2 

3°-9 
33-2 



33-8 
32.3 
30-4 
32.5 
32-5 
34-5 

32.4 
34-7 
35-1 
32.2 
33-6 
35-4 



32.6 



33-6 
32.5 
31-6 
32.5 
29.0 

29-5 
34-6 



29.6 
28.3" 
29-5 
30.7 
29. 8 
31-4 
33-0 
3t-8 
28.8 

22.9 
29.6 
29.2 
30.4 
28.5 
32.6 
29.6 



s 

3 O 



-1.0 



— '•3 
—0.9 
-3-6 
0.0 
— 0.2 



—1-3 

— 1.8 

— 1.4 
—5-9 

— 1.6 
+0-5 
— 2.2 



+0.1 
— 2.0 
—2.9 



+0.8 
—5-2 

— 0.2 



—2.1 

—2.6 
—2.4 
—4.0 
+ 0.7 



-4-4 

-3-9 

-o. 1 

0.0 

-4-3 



-8.9 
-0.9 



-4.6 



—1.9 
—1.8 



+°-3 



—3-0 
—3-4 



-1.4 
-2.2 



-3-5 



-2-7 
-3-° 



-7-4 
-6-3 



-6.1 
-4.0 



-2.5 



—3-0 
—1.8 
—2. i 



+ 1-3 
—3-9 



56 



56 



52 



46 



23 

22 


40 
46 


21 




23 




2lt 




23 




22 


45 


22 


45 


22 
23 


51 



Precipitation, in inches. 



fcl u 

a o 



0.53 
0.48 
0.48 
0.27 
0.90 
0.83 
0.08 
0.60 
0.31 

0-53 
1.20 
0.20 
0.32 
0.71 
1.07 
0.74 
0.74 

0.40 
0.44 
0.85 
0.38 
0.98 
0.50 
0.80 
1.05 



0.92 
0.82 
0.67 
1. 00 
°-95 
0-51 
0.42 
0.40 
0.50 
0.80 
0.90 
0.56 
1.23 
0.30 

0.61 
0.45 
0.49 
0.22 



0.65 
0.31 



o.53 
o.55 
0.90 

o.75 
0.30 

0.45 
0.80 
0.40 
0.70 
0.69 
0.52 

0.85 
0.60 
0.58 
T. 
0.25 
0.63 



0-39 
o. 10 
0.86 
0.70 
0.80 
0.87 
°-93 
0.8s 
0-35 

0.85 
1. 10 
1.60 
0.70 
0.64 
0.51 

°-J5 
0.40 
0.20 

0.60 
0.46 
0.48 
0.70 

0-35 
0.30 
0.51 



a 



S5 



+0.21 



— 0.21 
+0.60 
+0.07 
— 0.29 
—0.64 

-o-37 
—0.32 
—0.15 
+0.14 
— 0.24 
— 0.52 
— 0.09 
— 0.07 



—0-37 

— 0.42 
—0.30 
+0. 15 
— 0.50 
+0.46 
— 0. 19 
— 0.02 
+0.51 



+0.36 
— o. 01 
+ 0.0.5 
—0.13 
+0.21 
—0.33 
—0.23 



—o.37 
0.00 
—0.17 
—0.08 
+ 0. 13 
—0-45 



+ 0.05 
—0.05 



+0.39 
—0.44 



+ 0.17 



+ 0.20 
—0.15 



— 0. 16 
+0.23 



+0.22 
+0. 10 



+0.09 

— 0.21 
—O.63 
+ O.23 



— O.29 

— o-37 
+o.57 
+ 0.31 
+ 0.42 
— 0.09 
+ 0.37 



+0.61 
+ i. 10 



+ 0.22 
+ 0.17 



—0.32 
— 0.26 

— 0.27 
— o. 1.7 
—0.32 
+0.01 



—0.38 
— 0.12 



0-45 



0.50 
0.28 
0.05 
0.41 
o. 10 
0.27 

0.83 

0.20 

0.25 

o-53 
0.50 

0.45 
0.47 

0.30 
o.34 
0.60 
0.30 
0.58 
0.30 
0.50 
0.62 



0.72 
0.40 
0.40 

0.75 
0.79 

0-45 
o. 20 
0.40 
0.30 
0.30 
0.60 
0.36 
0.41 
0.30 

0.41 
0.20 
o.34 
0.22 



o.35 
0.20 



0.28 
0.32 
0.30 
0.32 
0.30 
0.25 

0.35 
0.40 
0.30 
0.36 
0.28 

0.40 
0.40 
°-33 
T. 
0-15 
o.35 



o. 14 
0.05 
0.4b 
0.30 
0.40 
0.38 
0.30 
0.40 
0.20 

0.30 
0.30 
0.40 
0.40 
0.20 
0. 11 
o. 10 
0.20 
o. 10 

0.30 

°-<5 
0.16 
0.40 
0.15 
0.30 
0.40 



o — 



5-1 
5-8 
3-8 



9.0 
7-5 
0.8 

4-5 
6.0 
4.2 



2.0 
3-2 
8.0 
10. 
6.0 
4.0 

4.0 
5-0 
8.0 

3-5 
6.0 
5-0 
9.0 

7-3 



7-5 
7-5 
6-5 
6-5 

7-7 
4-5 



4.0 
5-0 
8.0 
9-0 
8-3 
11. o 
3-o 

6.0 

4-5 
6.0 
5-o 



5-° 
3-1 



5-3 
6.4 
9.0 
7-4 
3-0 
4-5 
8.0 
4.0 
7.o 
6.3 
4.0 

8.5 
6.0 

T-. 5 
2.5 



3-5 
1.0 
6.2 
7.0 
8.0 
10.4 
9-3 
8.5 
3-5 

8-5 
8-5 

12.5 
7.0 
10.5 



1-5 
4.0 
2.0 

6.0 



4.2 
7.0 

4-5 

3-o 



.CO 

a 



Sky. 



.CO 

a 



if 

II 



•O B 



sw. 

nw. 

nw. 

s. 

s. 

s. 

nw. 

nw. 

s. 

nw. 

nw. 



nw. 
sw. 
nw. 



nw. 
nw. 



nw. 
nw. 
nw. 



nw. 
s. 



nw. 
nw. 



nw. 
nw. 
nw. 



nw. 

n. 

nw. 



w. 

nw. 
nw. 
nw. 
sw. 
sw. 



nw. 
nw. 
nw. 
sw. 
nw. 



nw. 

sw. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

s. 

w. 



nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

w. 

se. 

nw. 



nw. 
n. 

nw. 

w. 

nw. 

n. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 



Observers. 



R.E.Bowden. 

E. A. Palmer. 
C.C.Gray. 

Dr. Geo. Roberts. 

Wm. J. Phillips. 

T. B.A.Watson. 

C.C.Irwin. 

Dr. F.A.Long. 

Dr. P. H.Salter. 

G.S.Clingman. 

U. S. Weather Bureau. 

O.M.Collins. 

W.H.Hamlin. 

W.Gerecke. 

Dr.A.D. Nesbit. 

I. H. Weaver. 

C. J.Kadish. 

E.D.Smith. 

Dr. A. S. v Mansfelde. 

G.D.Carrington. 

H.C.Miller. 

C.Kellam. 

Doane College. 

E.B.Taylor. 

M.L.Libbee. 

J. W.Hoberg. 

W.F.Cramb. 

F.M.Flory. 

Dr. J. T.Fleming. 

Dr.C.M.Easton. 

U. S. Weather Bureau. 

E.Morton. 

W.F.Denton. 

W.F.Gingrich. 

L.E.Ost. 

L.W.Hahn. 

C.M.Miller. 

Wm X. Hunter. 

G. Treat. 

O.P.Lowry. 

F. A.Pettinger. 
Chas.R.Hare. 
F.Rt'in. 
H.L.Ormsby. 
W.S.Green. 
Geo.B.Mair. 
J. A.McRae. 
E.E.Bolcjack. 
A.Dahl. 

Geo. S.Truman. 

A.V.Carlson. 

E.Corbin. 

J. A.Pinkerton. 

C.E.Magner. 

Ira P.Griswold. 

E.S.Hayhurst. 

J.E.Goodrich. 

Erastus Smith. 

Paul Anderson. 

R.E. Pitcher. 
J F. Edwards. 
C.G.George. 
W.E. Winger. 
C.S. Draper. 
Dr. S.R. Razee. 
F.T.Owen. 
J.C.Swarts. 

C. Engstrom. 
Robert Malcolm. 
C.T.Watson. 
John McKenzie. 
Joel Hull. 
W.K.Hayes. 
W.Burdon. 

D. F.Hostetter. 

Robt. H.Willis. 

J. P. Fin ley. 

F.J. Bellows. 

A.B.Persinger. 

G.E.Bolkrom. 

U. S. Weather Bureau. 

D.McNall. 

O.G.Norton. 

F.D.Gallup. 

J.W.Wollick. 
Post surgeon. 
C. A. Waterman. 
D.A.Piercy. 
Mrs.C. A. Arter. 
Miss Ezada Phelps. 
U. S. Weather Bureau. 



* Temperature data from thermometers not self registering, t Occurred on more than one day. *, '•, °, etc., indicate number of days missing from observed readings. 
All records are used in determining State or district means, but State and district departures are determined by comparison of current data of only stations with normals. 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



November, 1898. 



< 



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wiK 




O fO if 00 NO 
Nno" p* o" o" 

— « PI PI CNI 


CTv t O 
-vo* fJ 

(S M M 


■* 


r^ 


PO 


•-. *t ifco p*3 — On if) p*3 

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PI N CI m ..-..-.PIPl 


- ONPJ 

^no' Pi 


POP! 
On Pi 

M CI 




3 




In r^ * 


D * ir.oo 


a oo 


^ &< ro 'TOO ^ *0 
N IO fO — 00 00 


6 


CN O 

♦o" 


N cO • 
O ♦ • 

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xbk 


— O tO Pi O Wi PO — O NO tOoO IOO CO N n i/)t*)N irt Oi « »*) "■ 

co m if) ♦ O to - N ♦ — IT) On n ' CO N N ♦ Pi ♦ CO (> 4 4 fi tO 

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ *■* to »-f ♦ W**rf co ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ 


• >■ o oo ^>.o•-.•- , -* ooo "io n oo no r^NO oo pi — if ««■ r- oo- 

• I^CO ifO 'O f MO"f OPOCNiif)"*- O •♦CO tON rCifW-tPi PiPn- 
••♦'♦'t*-* ^■♦^■tt-f in^«f--u--«' ttroTf * *t if; ■♦•>«■■♦ ■♦■ ^t • 




n 


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xbk 










6 
co 


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1 n ci o o co n »o n o io co io n o t-n c no ♦ ooo non 

Ci — PI Pi rO (M m m Ci — PJ CO Pi PJ Pi N M H t) N _. M Pi M Pi 


. if , o o "♦•♦.- ono • if. n ■*<» r- too co — i-i ■-! po «**o oo id • 




xi;i\ 


1 CM 1 ! NO * O CO if.CO « NO NO On "".CO NO On - Pi CO 
1 PO •* cO ♦ ♦ ♦ co ♦ ■♦ ♦ rO ♦ ♦ m ♦ ntO^MM Pi ♦ ♦ ♦ m 


• r-inroN onowoo •r-O'-'O or~--*0H. n n o o^ f-if, • 

• f*j ■*)• tj- rn ifirn'V'*-'^- •pn-^-.i-rn rnrn^*j--+ rn-*rOpnT*- rni^ > 




O 


■uik 


1 M nco Pi CO if -<tcO CO — ♦ O pOCO >OnJ-000 IT. Ci Pi O Ci 

W (S — W(N| (N|— MM N N M N M w Pi M P) N « H « N 


• r^ ♦• Pi if) ♦ if . pi aco to N if.co O no oco pn (OO 0~pi — • 

• N rOCJ M (ONMMM Pi PI N M H N d H PI Pi 1-lPIPIPiPI PiPI- 




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I Pi ♦ CO N tO f 1 ifj a N o> IOO ♦ — N O — Ci Pi Pi NOW ♦ CO co 
1 ♦ ♦ ♦ co ♦ c» f] t^ f^ w ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ m ♦ m ♦ ♦ m ♦ ♦ m ♦ 


• •*-if)f-pn O fO*- Pi Pi Oco iom OOP! »f-— N N« O O COO- 
-^■■♦'♦pn in^-^'^'* **-"*-mT*--* * t- t t) Tt ■*»*)'*■■«■''»■ poto ■ 




CO 
Ci 


•uiK 


1 n -ffixm «ox o * — ♦ ♦ — io eo co t- f « m n m o m 

W fl N h (N «■- Pi Ci N N N N h CNt — Pi Pi fi — Pi — Pi 


*pnr--r--0 "tf-NNONif GOifPiifpn fO -t iO 'O h i+ pi h m n " • 

.(Ml-.'-.N WWMPlPi H NNh PICNIP1PIPI M PIPIP* PiPI- 




w-iv 


1 ♦ O <0 O — IT, O « h - ♦ — if, N tO If . lOCO fOOQiON 
1 fm^N ^- (S fl^-fO't PO ♦ co co co ro t f^ ro t Tf * f: i*i f^ 


• if j N CI O CO +" O tO CI N O OPiOON * if, if, p* * IO N • 

• pO'*'*p*) ■+rO i »J'-*>f mtmtrn ■"tm-^-f'f popi PTOt mio ■ 




n 


U|K 


1 oo no no — co n ♦ — pi onno ovh oo ♦ o n pi o pi o — co 

N pi | ft — m ri m — — ~ „ _ „ Pi Pi - „ 


•PiPiCiCi r-.P*Ci^O -r^OiOPI fOPO-^-O-* O — rOCO N OnO • 

•MMMPl PI ■ » PI • •- «CNi ^^-MfSlM M CNI 




•xbk 


1 PO OO Pi co >0 * i/ 1 . « N CO Pi N — n if m n ♦ O to co if — n 
! PO PO Pi Pi CO m Pi CO Pi co N WN WM N mw N fl i^fOroN n 


• O ".CO N l-»NO i-i •♦ ■O'OT-' Pi if B CI t B NfNN NOt- 

■ co r*: ro f*) rtci mton ■ roM mio roci n",(oro roroci pi (O cic* • 




* 


•uik 


*00 no PO Ci — roO fOOO — "♦ — Ci O — Pi O Pi Pi W hcO iTj^ 


■ t^ pi to if ; n o ci ij-p. op^r-oo no — Tj-civp PiCNir^Pio r-.0 • 
Mpipipii i m T r m i ii i-- 




XBK 


■-• N N if CO N Ci O Pi N tO O ♦ ♦ O O Ci CO O ♦ 

N «« WW N « W. N « C* fO N N f 1 Pi PO M pi — If CO PJ m f| 


• n no ooco^pico r-r^— o— or-. >f.co n o *o if, o f if.co • 
■ N m^ro pn it m pi pi m com cotP — — tr: pi pi r*i e; — pi ♦■ w h • 




s 


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J-. O N Pi ♦ ^-NONO N>0 O t "«3N" Pi ft O" CO N N 


PI Tf — NO CC OcOO B NOfOr-. — 00 — OCO Pi — PO O PI t tJ- OnO • 




XBK 


if, t ir » \C if CO if — N O Pi tO O if CO O P* O ♦ O 

n n n ton n n ^ ro " ci ♦ po pi co n mN n « *mn N N 


• 000 — nOnOOOCO CO CO — — Pi r-.NO nOnO— OCOPI NN O"*' 
Pi M-Pi m POPi^-PIPI N CI N CNI CO —PiPJPiPi ^-pjPi- NN. 




♦ 

Pi 


•uiK 


— O — IOC0 tN mNO N<-< rOCNtNON't" iO<*5 tJ-nO IC 


• h OOC fO 


■^j-iO—O co — ■** tr>*t OifiPitO Pirn— -*tNO pi « iOO n pipo- 




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O •- co »-^no ifjO n *0 r^-NO OOnOn t>. i/". t^O 
nt^N " rt i-m^^fj n own n «-Nw^ro 


■ tOM iO0 


CO if, * co NfCO cOB NO « cOm co^OcO O O fOt 1-if- 
PlPOrOfO con Nt rOfO pi com coco PlPiPiPO- fi in pi pi pi pjPi * 




<*> 

Pi 


uiK 


r^ t- iTj U-; tT r*jNO On^TO iOOCOOnO N t O >0 « 

i-iii iTii« i i i I i wT J 


• ON>- OC NO 


— •**• IDCO ifjPIPlifjco O — O l>N O— 0<^t-» OONN05 OO ■ 
1 II II 1 • 




■xbk 


CO N r«lflN t^—ON'tf-ON NNO O^NO *h U1N f r^NO 

H, N '-"-N - N (OH N )-■ m N t-t (*3 1MMM.-.M 


■ iOOON 


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si 


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; •* ^J-op w 


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t 1 1 • 




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■CO NO P» — 


r-. if.NO PI o toco too ■ — ^j- <*-cO O IOONN 000 if t— N co . 
-o«m m — m m « -ro mm ■__,_._. r»* mm h pi > 




Pi 


•uik 


OvOCCNT ro — IC ^ O "VC NO •<»■«■«»->-'« 


; ^TrrOTf 


■* O "* if) OC PO00 — PO • O — Pi Ci ONOO-t— — •♦ — if) O rs^j-. 




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nOOCOnOnw^ C O N N [^ CO rs W-nO CO <*! OnoO O* 
m i£ N iO m - if, CNt>-NO i/) »-» m « 


■ PO C4 rOCC 


— f- — M" mcO m ON fON" CO ■♦ PiPiCOCi 1 * NOPOOcOO CiO - 

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I 8 


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— Ci fOOO POCO — ♦ CNI — ^cOOOnO — PI Pi Pi OO if , CO co o o<o • 

•*±M 1 M MM M" POCi — (NIIMM PiPiPOPO— M P) • 




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*0 •■ too cni-j-0"". r*» N l/l if, f, ONCNICOCOO CO Ococo m 
f "f N TfNO mi*iiOif (*! NO "*■ (^nD N NO nO NO no »A ^t-N© "l ^-NO 


— C "".co — co pi coco Pi — iO O OcociNO-* r-MPiO-* -to- 
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ON 


<MK 


Ot^.'»-r--CNi oooroto co rr;oo r^ «- — n if, co 


O N Pi if j 
■ N Pi Pi Pi 


— CO **-CO CO O iO iO N OO — iOO PI — to O co NO if. — o • 
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WO-NDr^m -O OCO ■*" CO "TO if, Q (mO^Q"* 
inir, lo ^TnO un * in M m uvo no w.no no f> iOno »fl 


CO Pi CO 
\5 m in m 


Pi iO O cO CO NO Pi iOnO iOnO to ^ tO POPi'^r-.cO OO 'f-NO CO — • 
no r-. iono ♦ iono totn to to to m to in m m m, m mmmmm mio* 




« 


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« « t^ N r» t-^ •- ■♦ f rO r^, t^. f.NO -• ".CO OO T if, 
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■*nO Pi NO 


ooo i-o * tn h if, r«. co + o co m ricoco"j-ci 00 pi w-no n o • 




'XBK 


if.NO ONr^"-" NOONr-.Nr*3 I—mnnOOn h. N 'O NnO 
it. if i/, -tvo ^»- tj- if , -*■ ifj if.NO Ncu-jifj if m in if , m 


NO NO PI N 


O to — o co ao — if, i-. OCOOPOI-. -*■ r-. w.no ■♦ — r-.ee — ■♦ io ■ 
if if if *f * in if, if, if) if if co if if m io iO m m no m io in io mro ■ 




N 


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NO if no <~cr^- N fON ■*■ CO t^NO ^-co — 1^. t^. t-» l^-CO On •*■ >-i 


O OCO O — if.NO vO to — NOCOcO nOO ♦CO PO BCO OfOin on- 
POCNlMfO PiPOPiCiPi (ON B m Pi cirOPiPiPI CiPIPiPO— COPO- 






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On Cni OnnO NO CO'l-'*-'*-!^ ^ r-* f, •* if) r*,NO r^**)0 O N M s 
rOifN^j-iriio ia un m m "", •*■ if, if ^ t*- if. ^■tJ-^j--^- inif, rj- in ^J- 


Nfl Pi — [-to — O h m -cO CO ♦OOoOCNi OOtOOt ifio* 
Tfinm-* «f, ♦ if, ♦ ^ lotoio^-if potj-ipi ♦ ♦ io<o rfinm ^-rf-- 




NO 


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*- •*■ i-*.co o f. ci M a ^. on oo-oor^f •«- f . if no •* 
(hh net h mn-CMM m •-■ r*; n m hn nnn n n n ci n 


NOO no N co NNO iO O iO O ♦ »OCO ♦ cO CO •♦ OCO N • 




XBK 


O CMC O noOcocniO no r^. M »f- On OnnO if . if. N CO ri O if, O 
m in if , if . m m m -*\o m mif.^) u-,if, *t m vr. if, in v m m u- , in 


r-. ci — CO OcOiOPiO Oifco PONO O NNO O— COCONOPi CiPO* 
iO m if , po o m tj- m tj- if, if, if, if , m ^ if , in -j if. in in if if , m m if • 


> 


1 • 


•uik 


r* nno row cocNiirjr^r* ■* nco no no o r^ ^t-oo if O oo u". o <- 

PI — « N W NCN) (NICH N*-CN1NCN1 h - f l f N CI h M N PI 


♦ if , — O oo ooo r- po oo (-. r-.*o o oo o if. ♦ O — to ono co p—no ■ 


: :::::! 


■xbk 


r^ on I^no »*■ ififjt^t-^rn now r*^ no MO i/".NO »/J On On « NO ■*■ 
if ij- if , ^ »n -tt -a if, ■»?- if unno if, »nm ■*■ m u-, m to -j-^in + in 


COQOPO Pi r— co •♦ O CO OB B Q — no CO ooooioo ♦■♦- 




i 


uik 


■* On N "*-CO " r» O C r-CO if , u*. if , m isif.iO N OnnO ■* On rO 
n h n n h mw mw w n n « n >-« ■- <ni cni cn >-«»->cnicnicn 


if— "♦•♦ N Pi if Pi CO ♦CO PONO NOO^-PINO CO if, o * « o^ • 

{MIHMM CNlPiMpiPi M N fl Pi M PiPiCiPiPI H Pi fi Pi t PiPI' 




xbk 


•<t-ifiON*l-r^ (Niwifjwifj n n « in fico too i^ rn if *t — tf 
*- •"*■-*■"*■ ■«*- ■<j-'*-Tf-*^- Tj-ifif. -^-if) ^m-*in^ Tj--*-*-^--r 


ONO CON OOOPlifCi r-.POOtfo POif)0 "PO ♦ NNO O PO PI • 
^♦ifPO intt-^^- ■^■♦♦'♦^j- ♦♦in*^ ■♦mrj-Tt^ -rf-■♦■ 




TO 


•uik 


* ON fC * OOnOnOI^. On W. ^ ON « C tCO •* >f if CO CO r-NO 
« CI « N B mw-.CNlCN| NfNIfOPlPl " h « N N MM rNieNt 


CO f COO CO ON ' ♦ fi — P* CO if. — if. Pi NO NOO O ♦" cO ■ 
Pi PI Pi PiPi-PlPi POPiPiPiCN PlPOPIPlPi — Pi CO PI Pi POP)- 




•xbk 


mXion- -*nO OO ^ Ci N O - if, W ■* r*-,\o *»0N" 
•*j-c*N'<t'*i"*cr frnrn^Tf * * if, tt tf ■^-■*-ij---f-->j- m r*s ^ ^- ^J- 


♦ — o — — co • O co NOOPiOO O N NOO ♦ r-.o ■♦no n pi — - 

♦ ♦rOW ■^■■^■•♦■PO ■♦^■♦♦■rO ♦■♦•♦rot- co-vt-ttco ■♦■%*-* 




2 


•uik 


fNiCNif, i/nO r-^ifONCNiON t^r-*(Nit-^0 CNirO (OnC if) (*S « nno »/"* 
N h N N CI N -t ci«h PI N fl N cn m m PI N PI h N N H N 


PO NNO CO CO PONO PO — Pi N ■♦ ♦ PO NNO if.NO PO PO o o •♦ o coo • 
Pi pi m m n h bio M — Pi Ci Pi PifOPJNPi h mm B h Pipj- 




xbk 


■* r* -*co <*> no n . i-» t-^co ■* r- •- »o <o w.no O On if.CO *o CO 
■^-rO-r-a-Tt- * (« ^ ^ * *r^in\tTi- •>S-'*'<J--»-'>f f, n ro * rn 


if tO — CO if.O ^00 O N\0 NO"f OPIPiOiO ♦'OOPliO CO— - 

-T ♦ — CO rr. -+ "", ♦ r<~> T '"- ♦ ♦ i""j f ~* ♦ ^ -f -T ir. -r -1 — -+ — - 




S 


uik 


r— no '^if)ON O O f/ * O *- « N tv. ir, ^-nO ^nO *-i in tni/co 
t- - PI — w N B « N m N PI N N CI i-MWtNlPl N PI PI f 


OOI-.PO OOPiPO- — O O •♦ CONO poo O O Ci if, O if, • 
CIm it CIClMpiPi CN — N Pi Ci m Pi POPI fl — Ci m Ci PM _ _ . 




xbk 


NO -*-co — Pl O", *» PI if if -^-CXS if. Pi if; N if, if) ts CNI NO "«- PI "f 


NO pOh ♦■(-.— to ♦• |sh fi m/) in tONC '♦O O iO — CO O iot-« 
♦ ♦^-PO in^J-rO-Nt^ '♦^■■♦'^■Nf ■♦«i-int«it lONtTp** «-♦■ 




d 


uik 


rj- f « i/l l~. 0->"*Pir^ ♦ f* « W-CO OGnOrO OOOnO'-' 


— —i IfO OCOiOPOO — NOO rtO O Ci 


♦ O N-OOt*- OtO- 
Pi M pi - ■ 




xbk 


w on Pi f) O-^O-i^, •- f^ ■-. h« •- CO if.CO a O « rn if rn if, ~ 
Trfn^-^in * t io f, Tf rj- u", if, Tt- t "imfot* fC-*T*-tn^- 


OOiOCO Pi ♦•♦■♦■ PO *0 — to N co — PO 


♦ •♦ NCO ♦■ Ci IO O • 

♦ ■♦ if, ♦♦•♦♦- ♦♦■• 




O 


uik 


vO u",cO C<: NO — NO n if. - iO * CO ON""." O if, N N O 


♦ iOO PO Tj-i-tOOO O O — ♦ Ci OO 
N— Pi I Ci m rociMM mpo 


tO N OOO OO Pi ■ • 

*..-, — POPipi PICO-- 




XBK 


if t*- f*" If . T PI NO On if p*5 'O » CO ".if, '*■'!■ r^-00 if CI N P^no 
T'MnfO f "^-mTj-rnpn rn ^ en c, to 'l-PirOPOPO rOP*jrnfnfO 


COOlO— Ci N NN OPI tO Ci •♦ if 

popocoPi ♦rociPOPO mropopopo coco 


N. if OOO ♦ POO 00 if; • 
COPO if, inrOrOPO fOPO- 




CO 


uik 


*iOO»N""' O if, r*.co PI COCO ONh CO O ""- Pi vO NOOO "*CO 
n m pi n n rn--.pipi pipipiPiCNi pipiPiPiCNi mnponn 


00 if N Ci O to if • to f . if, fi coco 
PiPiCi m fi m pi pi coPi Pi roci Pipi 


O- Pi-ooo- if. • - 

CiPi PiCOfiCOfi Ci^-'* 




XBK 


if , if) "". t> O (s N m C, On t-.NO t^ tf if) ■♦ ■"*■ 'tCO OlO NfO 
if Tj- ifi rn Tf no ^t **;nO ro f.if if «o f^^mmm fn^mifcn 


o co to o coooooo ocoor-t ro«o 
fOPOcoro rororo^PO m co m if. co cotf 


COCO Q CO cO tf , O CO Pi * 
COPO OOPOCOCi ♦m- 




n 


•uik j 


NO-*00t-^ fOO fONN r*ON tfCO O On OnnO Onoo 
r^, pi-u-mci t*j « c* «** <*) ^-riTtPirn pipipip»m 


NO NO - -»■ 

pi m tj- ■*■ 


— O COCO BCO O NV *f r-. — — Pi PiOO 
♦ N (OH piPOPiCOPO ♦PirOPOPO POPO 


\0 — — if , Ci if if • 
roro ficoco^ro PO^ - * ■ 




xbk ! 


vCCO'-'PJN ONt OnO N O-ONPiCOif) pOnO pi On On 
m "*nO no no if, m -t? no if- if j if, r* m\o NNO m if, if) 


lf,CO CO CO 

if , m m m 


pi pi "♦ pi OOO r-.co r-. Pi n ♦ NO 
vo mint no no tn io to vo mmmio too 


r-.co Pi Ci ♦ O CO 00 • • 
to m m\o no O m mm- • 




NO 


uiK | 


l-OOi^. ^ "CO N ON u". N B h to if, if, — < CO Pi 
(i fi mroN pnpjMpiP) fO N « "! f^ NPipiroro 


OnCO CO On 
PI PI Pi PI 


Ci OO ci if - O O if. — OO if O CO cO 
POMTj-Ci CiPOPOPiPi PO — PJ PI Pi PiPO 


IOO OOO— O NO* 

pirn ciPiPifOfi piPi- 




XBKl 


OOh.OOn ON^O OO ON t- iC t-» N On QnCO Q On 

NO tnNO O NO If.NO NO If.NO if NO NO if NO NO ^* IflNO Ifj 


r^ onco r- 
if if m if 


CI COO N O 0".NO OCOOCiQ COCO 

no O O tO O ifO if if no in inO O in in 


O Q N Pi Ooo OO NO • 

iono in no to in m in • 




tO 


•UIK | 




piO^O 0^-wr»--*" ■nfON'V'-.NO NOPICOONO 
PifTij- Nt m « f< ro ■^■pn-tf-popi pi cnropi * 


nOnO •♦CO 
pj m m m - 


♦ O — — ir,ttNN if . ft co b Oco 


♦ CO OOOPiPOPO if. 00 ■ 

poto m *•*■♦-•* co mm • 




"XBK 1 




«OwcoiO if, if^-TOO ^ifjifJON nci Q Qco 
in«c no O nC no winO *0 no ^O no if . in i0^0 v 1 "^ 


nO On On On 

•O if if. if • 


— if, if O — Q IONO «♦■ COCO N NO CO 
O tO tO TT NNO if, if if O invO to if \Tf& 


a- co co co c - ♦ t r^ ■ 
if m m r-.o o m o io ■ 




. 1 


"IK | 


♦ in w, O if, OOMONf, «-J-"J"OnO if- if. O NW1 
•v n ^t •* ^i mPONpn^ m m m p", m mpi^pi^j- 


On Pi •* f 

h* M- pn -^ 


Pi CI COP) CO PO fi PO O PtCi^- NO PO 
mropOfO ci if, ro ij- ♦ mrococoro tio 


\C — If — Ci Ci 00 NC© • - 




J 1 


•xpk: 


CO N N if. B ".PICO B Q nO ? if . ""- f O t-*0 <~0 "♦ 

no t-.NO P- p- r-NO no p-no "-o ~o r^o p- ■c- •€■ '-o if, no 


pi no r-.NO 

NO NO NO NO 


N Ci ♦ ON.IOOO — ^00 O O Pi CO 

t-. P-.0 o o o o o o r->o ooo o o 


CO fi CO NOOB Cilf'- 
O O O Nno no O O O ■ ■ 


: : : : : : i 


ro 


uik | 


t n f . o <o — if.co a-, co pi «rco -j i~ t- pi <t, n 


NO Pi Pi ON 


— — O OcOPiOPi ♦ if CO N Ci tf Pi 
cO^Pit POPOfOPJPO POPOCiPiCi Pi^ 


OO 00 O Pi r-.oo ♦ CO T ' • 

NC* piciPimpi pio** 


: : : : : : i 


xbk i 


-1-nO if '*". ON •«■ ■«■ "*nO if^-r^NCO 00 iu O if, O 
vo r^. r--»o r-> no no nno *o t-.p-p-.t-.p^ Ncmp , »r-.p». 


rn OO N 

O P--NO N 


r-.0CiO 0O0O0 tf.O Pi CO NO 
r-. r-. c—o p- n r--NO r— no o nno no n 


OOO O ♦ Pi ♦ CO CO O • 
OO NONNNp-. OnO • 






uik | 


CO tNO if . O O 1 r-CG if, rO >0 « tsO N O W i f, O t 


■♦r- ■♦ ■*■ 
pi pi p* w 


o pi r-. io ■♦ Pi io ■♦ r- — coo n. ♦■ ♦ 


o io o — ■♦ oo ♦o • • 
— Pi POPiPiCiCi dpi'- 


: ::::•' 
i 


: i 


•xbkI 


tf.vO *NO t— If, CTNO U If) « >— N(J ps if ) LP m r«, f. «r 

\0 mNO mNO if. f. if-NO nC *0 t--NC no nC no if no no no 


>n rOlf, Q 

NO NO If.NO 


cONPitO *0 PO CO ♦ Pi ♦COOiOiO •♦ co 

OOnOO OOOOO Otn inO o o o 


COO tO O r-. ♦ Q ♦ Pi - • 
O O O O NO iono o o • 






uik 


O fi |sN* f, -^Pi n -NO i^.nO COCO*- •^-OOnOW 
-*-pi*r"5-»- rnwmcnpn ^-if^cNiPi «•*■*■«'»■ 


On Pi no •*- 


IO if. . — ^ O CO — IOO N N.O co — Pi co 
— r fi co CI m (OPi ♦po Tj-PiPOPlPO fO^ 


♦ o o — f) ♦■ o ♦to- 
rn co ♦ PO ■*}- ♦ ♦ ♦♦ • 




XBKi 


no On n s *f no t-s. troo \it -r pi if.Nu oo t- pi r- f ; n 
in if . no no no <C i/", »f,NO if; NONONO^nin £>P^if,'fi*o 


0; O^.N 


l-if.co Pi — ♦ if, O lOcOOPiN OiO 
if.O if- m O O io if. tf , nC O n -j- io in io 


OCO tO O Ci ♦ ♦ *ON« • 
tf , in n no m tn no -O • • 






DO 

c 


C 
C 


- 

1 

< 


<r:es 


a 


:^i 

= £ = 
sac 


- 
8 


Q 

> 




: > 

7 ~ 
fid o 


> 

s- 

« 


' 1 


C 


X. 

e 

s§ 

IE 

is 


i. 

- a 




etc ^ 

-: * - 

■seel 


a 


c 

& 




i 

- 


r 

s 


E 
; 




j5! 


>• ': 

3 : 
ca : 


— 
c 


4 
-- 

- 


* 

X 

c 




a 
c 
c 
a 


at ? 

< -r 

- h 

s •= 


ii 

.eu a 


\ 


a 

1 

c 

- 


fl 

a 
it 

a 


z 

1 

- 
a 
a 


b * | 


; MM; 

: : : : : : 




oc 
Ci 

oc 



> 



O 



O 
0* 



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"a 








t- 




4) 




TS 




a 




£ 





CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



November, 1898. 













Daily precipitation for Nebraska, Novemb 


er, 


1898. 


























Stations. 


Day of month. 




i. 


2. 


3- 


4- 


> 


6. 


7- 


8. 


9- 


10. 


11. 


12. 


13. 


14- 


15- 


16. 


17- 


18. 


'9- 


20. 


21. 


22. 


23- 


24. 


25. 


26. 


27- 


28. 


29. 


30. 


3>- 


CI) 






























t 














t 


•45 
.20 




t 


.08 




+ 


t 


t 








0.53 
























• 4i 






























t 








•30 




















.10 


"" 












.20 
.10 
•40 
.10 

t 

• 05 
•05 
































•■5 
.20 
















.20 




















0.45 
























































t 












t 
































•30 








+ 
t 

t 
t 














































• 34 
.60 


. 10 




t 
■'5 








0.44 
0.85 
0.38 
0.98 
0.58 

+ 


























•°5 


































•03 
































•30 
•58 

t 
• 17 
•05 
















































.40 
































•33 




























.20 




























































t 




•15 


•03 
















.18 






.01 


.02 


■05 


.07 


t 






0.48 
0.25 












































































.22 




























































































































.10 

t 
• 03 












t 


.20 

•05 

* 


t 


.20 

t 




0.65 
0.85 












t 








■30 










t 














•30 
■27 
































.06 


















t 


.04 


•03 
.21 
. 10 
.22 

■35 
























.06 
























0.27 


























t 
















• 30 


.10 






t 


t 
































•15 
.28 
























0.37 










t 












































.10 






























.10 
























. 10 


































































































































.28 










t 








.10 








•15 




t 

.20 

t 










0.53 










































• 72 






































•05 

.04 
















• 50 




























•15 








.10 


































t 




.02 
































































_ 












•40 
•30 

•25 
.20 










.... 


























• 07 
•32 
















t 

.20 
t 


.40 












t 

.04 
•'5 

.10 




t 




0.82 














































.06 


















•°5 


• 30 








•15 
. 10 














+ 












t 


•30 
















.20 
•31 
•30 
.10 
•40 
•07 










.IO 


0.90 






















■32 








.02 












t 




















































0.30 




























•15 
.16 










.28 






.20 












. 10 
















.02 


t 














.02 


















.20 








0.67 




















.14 












































•25 










•35 


















t 








. 12 








t 
t 


.16 














•15 
















•05 






































•75 


•30 
•03 










•25 
.20 

•05 
.40 

•30 
•05 
■'5 
•25 
.02 
•30 

t 

t 
.05 

+ 

• 40 
•30 
. 10 
.10 


























































.02 
.10 
.20 
































t 




010 










T 
















.02 
















.10 
.40 








•24 
. 10 


86 












































t 














































•35 






• 40 


. 10 
























.20 








.40 




















t 














. 10 
.20 
•79 








.10 



































•35 






























80 












.01 








t 






t 
















•03 






.01 


"+' 


•°9 


















T 






• 40 






















t 




























-40 


















t 
•05 












































t 






t 


• 40 




t 


t 

.08 
.04 




•03 
.02 

•°5 








0.08 


























•36 
• 41 
















0.91 








































t 


.10 
























• 40 


































0.80 
























■30 
• 30 


















. 10 
































t 






























•50 




t 


t 


t 


































.06 








• 04 








•35 
•45 
.80 

•15 
.01 
. 10 
. II 
•'9 
.20 
■ 83 
.20 
.40 
. 10 
. 10 






t 




0.87 




















0.51 
















































.02 




.20 

.20 

•05 
.20 
t 

. 10 
•03 










Nesbit 








t 








.09 








t 


t 

.08 
•30 


























.20 


































.10 






t 

t 


•OS 


•05 


.02 


0.31 




































• 25 




t 

t 


North Platte 








.01 








.06 








.04 
.27 
















.02 
•03 




•07 




0.51 






















t 








.02 






.12 
.22 




t 


.02 




Odell 




t 












































t 


t 






.01 




















.08 
t 
■05 




•03 




































t 






t 


































I 

■25 

3ft 


















.10 
.20 












Ough 




















































































































































.06 
.08 




t 


.20 












.07 

•30 






t 








































•3° 


.20 


•05 




































































































































St Paul 
























.28 


















■19 
. 10 

•25 












•05 




































t 
t 
















• 70 










.20 
.04 






















































.01 








.02 




' . 




























































































•'5 


•15 








. 10 


.10 
. 10 
.10 































t 






















■05 
















"; 








































•30 








.10 
•3° 

T 






































































70 


























•53 


















.18 
•50 
.20 
. 10 
•5° 
.36 
. 10 

•45 
40 
•47 
.10 
.20 










t 
.20 


t 








0.71 
































































































•30 
.60 










•30 
.20 






























































































■07 






















.10 
•05 
.02 

t 
.12 

t 




• 40 
•15 

.01 

.05 
.12 

t 

t 


















































































t 










.01 














t 








.40 
■05 
.18 

t 
































•■5 








.04 












































t 


t 












.41 






































•27 








































.10 






























t 














































.24 








•30 




























•>5 
























.20 




















































■30 























































































* Total amount from 16th and 27th. 



t Trace (when precipitation is less than 0.01 of an inch). 



y.y 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. 



REPORT FOR DECEMBER, 1898. 



NEBRASKA SECTION 



OF THE 



CLIMATE AND CROP SERVICE 



OF THE 



WEATHER BUREAU. 



PUBLISHED BY AUTHORITY OF THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE. 



UNDER DIRECTION OF 

WILLIS L. MOORE 

CHIEF OF WEATHER BUREAU 
BY 

G. A. LiOVELsAND, 

SECTION DIRECTOR, 

Office, University of Nebraska, Lincolp. 




Natural Hist 



OS 

oo 



PQ 

o 

a 

02 

Q 
55 



55 



> 

Pi 
P-. 

Q 
55 
<3 

02 

S 

w 

O 

02 

hh 

55 
<J 
W 

S 



55 
O 
35 



co 




December, 1898. 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, 

Climate and Crop Service 



WEATHER BUREAU. 



CENTRAL OFFICE: WASHINGTON, D. C. 



NEBRASKA SECTION, 

G. A. LOVELAND, Section Director, 

LINCOLN, NEBR. 



Vol. III. 



LINCOLN, NEBR. 



No. 12. 



AURORAS. 

[From Waldo's Elementary Meteorology.] 

"The aurora — called in the northern hemisphere the aurora 
borealis, or northern lights, and in the southern hemisphere 
aurora australis, or southern lights — is an illumination of 
the sky which occurs in middle and polar latitudes, and 
which has a zone of maximum frequency from the 60th to 
the 70th parallel of latitude north and south of the equator. 
It rarely occurs within the tropics. It is possible that some 
of the widespread, intensely active, auroral phenomena have 
an electromagnetic origin ; while those of local occurrence 
may be simply the electrostatic charge of the air layer, ren- 
dered luminous by atmospheric changes. 

"As usually observed by us, the aurora consists of an arch 
or band of light. It may, however, have various forms, such 
as that of an arch, ribbon, collection of beams, corona, and 
haze or diffused light. The auroral arch usually spans the 
sky in an east-westerly direction. In the middle latitudes 
it is seen to the north, and in the extreme northern latitudes 
to the south. The dimensions are variable. (A band ob- 
served in 1893 was supposed to be 15 miles wide, perhaps 250 
miles high, and over 1,000 miles long.) In general, the arch 
may be said to vary between an unknown lower limit and 
800 miles in altitude. The arch sometimes varies in inten- 
sity in different parts. Frequently band-like streamers of 
light are seen perpendicular to the arch, and they extend to 
an unknown height. Sometimes these streamers are con- 
stant during their existence, and sometimes they are inter- 
mittent and pulsating, flashing out at intervals. 

"Auroras in the northern hemisphere are least frequent in 
January and June, and most frequent in March and October. 
There seems also to be an 11-year period of frequency such 
as was found by astronomers for sun spots." 



AGRICULTURAL INTERESTS. 

The month has been favorable for the agricultural inter- 
ests of the State. The absence of severe storms and the 
light snowfall have been exceptionally good for stock on the 
range, and it is reported in excellent condition. The absence 
of snow in the southeastern counties has not been quite as 
favorable for wheat as was December, 1897, but wheat ap- 



pears to be wintering well. In some fields the corn crop of 
1898 has not all been gathered yet. 



ACCURATE AND COMPLETE RECORDS. 

The attention of observers is called to the importance of 
making the records as accurate and complete as possible. 
A record of the amount of rainfall or snowfall should be 
made each day. Even if no rain or snow has fallen the ob- 
server should bear in mind that his official record of that 
fact is as important as any other. The fact should be indi- 
cated by a zero (0) in the proper column. If the amount is 
too small to measure, enter "T." Some of the observers 
have made the error of omitting to record the fact that some 
rain or snow fell when the amount was too small to measure, 
and many omit the zero on the days when no rain or snow 
has fallen, thus leaving the record somewhat uncertain, and 
to that extent reducing the value of the report. 

The maximum and minimum thermometers should be 
read and set once a day, as nearly as possible at the same 
hour of the day. The best time to read and set them is 
about sunset. When set both thermometers should read the 
same. It is evident that if the thermometers are correctly 
set and correctly read the maximum temperature recorded 
for any day should not be lower than was the air tempera- 
ture at the time the thermometers were set the preceding 
day, nor should the minimum recorded be higher. Tempera- 
tures below zero should be invariably recorded with a dash 
before the numeral ; e. g., 8° below zero should be recorded, 
—8°. 

In the hope that the records may be improved, several 
brief circulars of instruction have been printed, covering the 
methods of recording the most important meteorological 
elements, and when an error in method is noticed in the 
record of an observer a circular of instruction on that point 
will be sent to him — not to criticise, but in the hope that he 
will read it and not make the same error in future reports. 

At present only a few of the observers in the State enter 
notes of miscellaneous phenomena in the place on the form 
for remarks. In recent conversations with some of the 
observers it has been discovered that they observe and record 
on the retained copy of the report many interesting facts 
which are not entered on the copies sent to this office, for 
the reason that the form does not specifically call for this 
data, and it was therefore assumed that this character of 
data was not desired. This is a mistake, and attention is 
called to pages 20, 21, and 22 of " Instructions to Voluntary 
Observers," where will be found instructions for recording 
frost, corona?, thunderstorms, tornadoes, and auroras. If 
the suggestions in the paragraph on " General Phenomena of 
Climate," on page 22, could be followed, much valuable data 
would be obtained. 

While it is not intended to request an increase in the al- 
ready large amount of work done by the voluntary observers, 
it is requested that all who notice or record the facts make 
the record on the copies sent to this office. A short note 
regarding the progress of farm work or the growth of the 
crops during the month will also be valuable. 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



December, 1898. 



OBSERVERS' NOTES. 

Stock in excellent condition. Very little hay fed.— A. H. Gale, 
Bassett 

Cold weather, with snow on the ground, prevented much corn husk- 
ing; there is still much corn to be husked. — E. F. Stodffeb, Bellevue. 

Pleasant month, free from wind, and no moisture to speak of. — Mrs. 
L. A. WiBley, Culbertson. 

Fine month for stock, sheep, and cattle; all doing well. — R. MALCOLM, 
Imperial. 

This month lias been remarkable for the number of clear days, the 
light precipitation, and the steady, cool weather, which is not favorable 
for winter wheat. — ErAstus Smith, Ravenna. 



COMPARISON OF PAST DECEMBERS. 

The monthly maximum and minimum temperatures for several sta- 
tions have been obtained for the years 1876 to 1888, and the following 
table has been revised, and differs slightly from the comparative tables 
previously published : 



1876 . 

1877 . 

1878 . 
1879 ■ 



^Temperature.-^ 
Mean. Max. Min. 
62 



1882 , 
18S3. 
1884 . 
188s . 
1886 , 
[887 



19.6 
32.8 
19.2 
15-7 
16.9 
32-5 
22.8 
25-6 
14.4 
31-1 
20.7 
21.9 
30.8 



—25 

— 2 

— 16 
—27 
—26 

— 9 
—21 

— 14 



—29 

— 7 



Prec. 
0.24 

1.85 
0.44 
0.58 
0.62 
0-57 
1. 01 
1.04 
0.90 
0.94 
0.81 
0.71 
0.45 



1SS9. 



.—Temperature.— - 
Mean. Max. Min. Prec. 



1892. 
1893. 
1894. 
1895. 
1896. 
1897. 



36.1 
32.5 
3i-3 
23-3 
27.6 
29.9 
28.1 
34- o 
22.9 
23-5 



Average for the 
State for past 
23 years 25.8 



—14 
—10 
—22 

—23 
—16 
— 20 
—12 
—10 
—26 
— 22 



o-37 
0.13 

I-I3 

0.61 
0.89 
0.43 
0.15 
0.23 
1.3' 
0.32 



0.68 



CLIMATOLOGY OF THE MONTH. 

General characteristics: The month was characterized by 
low temperature, deficient precipitation, and clear skies. 
The minimum temperatures were below zero quite generally 
on the 8th, 9th, 80th, and 31st. The warmest period was 
from the 14th to 28th, when the maximum temperatures 
were generally above freezing. The greatest daily range of 
temperature at any station in the State was 64°, at Fort 
Robinson on the 20th. Generally, however, the greatest 
daily range was between 35° and 40°. 

Atmospheric pressure: The mean pressure was 30.24 inches, 
which is 0.06 of an inch above the normal for December. 
The highest during the month was 31.10 inches, at North 
Platte on the 9th, and the lowest, 29.46 indies, at Omaha 
on the 29th. 

Temperature: The mean temperature for the State, as de- 
termined from the records of 93 stations, was 23.5°, which 
is about 2.0° below the average of the past twenty-three 
years. The highest temperature was 83°, at Fort Robinson 
on the 20th, and the lowest, 22° below zero, at Camp Clarke 
and Hay Springs on the 9th and Lodgepole on the 8th. 

Wind: The prevailing direction of the wind was from the 
northwest. The average velocity was 8.0 miles an hour, 
which is about the normal. The highest velocity was 36 
miles an hour, at Lincoln on the 29th, from the north, and 
at North Platte on the 6th, from the northwest. 

Precipitation: The average precipitation for the State, as 
determined from the records of 130 stations, was 0.32 of an 
inch, which is slightly less than half the average of the past 
twenty-three years. The largest precipitation reported at 
any one station was 1.72 inches, at Auburn, and the least, 
none, at several western stations. The precipitation for the 
year was 89 per cent of the normal. 



Snowfall: No severe snow-storm occurred during the 
month, hut a small amount of snow fell on several days, 
making the average for the month slightly above the nor- 
mal. The average snowfall (in inches) for the several 
sections was as follows: Southeastern, 3.7; northeastern, 
2.9; central, 1.8; southwestern, 1 .7 ; western, 2.7 ; north- 
western, 5.1 ; average snowfall for the State, 3.0. 

Wind and humidity table. 







Wind. 


II 


imidity. 


Stations. 


Miles. 


Mean. 


Max. 


Dlr. 


Date. 


Mean. 


Low- 
est. 


Date. 




7,i85 
6,491 

5.475 


9-7 
8.7 

7-4 


36 
36 
28 


n. 

nw. 

nw. 


29 
6 
29 


80.2 
63.8 

77-5 


42 
3° 
56 


25 


North Platte 




26 






Means 


for the six equal sections of the State. 





Southeastern . 
Northeastern. 

Central 

Southwestern 

Western 

Northwestern 

State 



Temperature. 



Mean. 



21.7 
23.6 
24.4 
25-9 
23-5 
22.0 

23-5 



Aver- 
age.* 



26.5 
30.0 
26.7 
29.0 
28.9 
27-5 
28.1 



Precipitation. 



Mean. 



0.30 
0.74 
0.19 
o. 19 
0.22 
0.29 

0.32 



Aver- 
age.! 



0.85 
0.74 
0.69 
o-73 
0-53 
0-59 
0.69 



Number of days- 



Rainy. 



2.7 
2.7 
■ •5 
1.8 
2-3 
2.2 



Clear. 



■ 5-8 
18.7 
19.2 
16.1 
19. 1 
20.2 

18.2 



Partly 
cloudy 



8.7 
8.7 
8.2 
9.0 
6.9 

8.8 



Cloudy. 



3-9 
5-' 
3-1 
6.8 
2-9 
4.0 

4-3 



* For ten years. t For twenty years. 

Supplemental precipitation table. 



Stations. 



Bartley 

Bassett 

Bellevue 

Benedict 

Bradshaw 

Burchard 

Chester 

Clatonia 

Cody 

Culbertson 

Dannebrog 

Eden 

Elba 

Ewing 

Fairfield 

Fairmont 

Gordon 

Haigler 

Hayes Center. .. 

Hickman 

Hooper 

Johnstown 

Lyons 

McCool Junet. . . 

Marquette 

Merriman 

Monroe 

Nemaha 

Norman 

Ord 

Osceola 

Ough 

Palmer 

Palmyra 

Plattsmouth — 
Pleasanthill .... 

St.Libory 

Salem 

Sargent 

Schuyler 

Sioux City, Iowa 

Spragg 

State Farm 

Stoekham 

Strang 

Stratton 

Syracuse 

Table Rock 

Valparaiso 

Wallace 

Wauneta 

Wilber 

Willard 

Wisner 

Wymore 

Yankton, S. Dak 



Counties. 



Red Willow 

Rock 

Sarpy 

York 

York 

Pawnee — 

Thayer 

Gage 

Cherry 

Hitchcock . 
Howard ... 
Nemaha . . . 

Howard 

Holt 

Clay 

Fillmore .. . 
Sheridan . . . 

Dundy 

Hayes 

Lancaster . 

Dodge 

Brown 

Burt 

York 

Hamilton .. 

Cherry 

Platte 

Nemaha . . . 
Kearney ... 

Valley 

Polk 

Dundy 

Merrick .... 

Otoe 

Cass 

Saline 

Howard . . . 
Richardson 

Custer 

Colfax 



Rock 

Lancaster. 
Hamilton . 
Fillmore . . 
Hitchcock 

Otoe 

Pawnee ... 
Saunders.. 
Lincoln . . . 
Chase . 



Saline ... 
Lincoln 
Cuming 
Gage . . . 



Length 
of rec- 
ord, yrs 



Total. 



o. 14 
0.25 
0.30 
0.49 
o. 25 

0.43 

1.67 

0.70 

0.10 

0.07 



1.70 
0.05 
0.05 

0.3b 

0.60 

O. IO 

T. 
T. 

0.68 
0.23 
o. 12 
0.92 

0-55 
0.32 

O. IO 

0.13 
1. 15 



0.02 
T. 
T. 

0.70 
0.50 
0.82 
0.40 
1.79 



0.20 

0.06 

0.30 

T. 



o. 29 
1.66 



0.87 

O. OI 



Depart- 
ure from 
normal 



— 0.22 
—1. 18 



+0.09 
+ 1.13 



-0.33 
+0.97 



— 0.76 
+0.09 



— 0.24 
—0.32 
— 0.02 



-0.34 
-o-35 



— 0.41 

—0-75 
+ 0.04 
— 0.41 



-0.65 
—0.82 



—0-93 
+ 0.41 



— 0.46 
+0.87 



No. 
rainy 
days. 



Observers. 



R.S.Baker. 

A. H. Gale. 

E.F.Stouffer. 

R.B. Brabham. 

E.C. Roggy. 

J. A.Kinsey. 

W. J.Kissick. 

F.W.Jones. 

C.M.Heinly. 

Mrs.L.A.VVibley. 

W.J.Melson. 

D.J.Wood. 

S.M. Wellman. 

G. II. Benson. 

M. L.Jones. 

G.H.Borden. 

Amos Burwell. 

T.P.F.Haine. 

R.C.Orr. 

O.O. Franklin. 

T. W.Lyman. 

F. Avery. 

N.R.Kellam. 

F.S.Morris. 

John Ellis. 

F. Hussong. 

Wm. Webster. 

R.J. Duff. 

J. F. Barnes. 

Jas. Milford. 

G.W.Murbarger. 

Wm.Ough. 

E.H.Smith. 

W.D.Bancroft. 

W.Z.Pickett. 

J. W. Ingles. 

W.I. Meader. 

W.W.McDermet. 

J.S.Spooner. 

L.N.Dickinson. 

Weather Bureau. 

S.W. Spragg. 

S.W.Perin. 

J. W. Gray. 

S.Diller. 

C.W.Shurtliff. 

L.Howell. 

S.H.Dopp. 

W.. I. Craven. 

A. E.Yocum. 

J.W.IIann. 

S.E.Davis. 

Wesley W.Lewis. 

N.C. Sears. 

H.B.Ware. 

Weather Bureau. 



i i^iwmh.1 <m*m 



December, 1898. 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



Climatological data for Nebraska, December, 1898. 



Stations. 



NORTHEASTERN SEC 

Agee * 

Blair 

Columbus 

Creighton 

Fremont 

Hartington 

Lynch* 

Madison 

Norfolk 

Oakdale 

Omaha 

O'Neill J 

Santee Agency 

Stanton * 

Tekamah 

Wakefield 

Westpoint 

Southeastern Sec. 

Arborville* 

Ashland 

Auburn * 

Aurora* 

Beatrice 

Crete 

David City 

Dawson * 

Edgar * 

Fairbury 

Geneva 

Harvard 

Hebron 

Lincoln 

Nebraska City 

Odell* 

Kulo* 

Seward* 

Superior* 

Tecumseh 

Turlington 

Weepingwater * 

York* 

Central Sec. 

Albion 

Ansley 

Ashton* 

Broken bow* 

Burwell* — ." 

Callaway 

Central City * 

Dunning* 

Ericson * 

(ienoa 

Gothenburg 

Grand Island 

Greeley * 

Kearney * 

Lexington 

Loup* 

North Loup 

iiavenna 

St. Paul* 

Southwestern Sec. 

Alma * 

Arapahoe* 

Beaver City 

Benkelman* 

Bluehill* 

Curtis 

Franklin 

Hastings* 

Holdrege* 

Imperial 

McCook * 

Madrid* 

Minden 

Kedcloud * 

Hepublican * 

Wilsonville 

Western Sec. 

Camp Clarke 

Gering ' 

Kimball 

Lodgepole 

Nesbit 

North Platte 

Seneca* 

Thedford* 

Whitman* 

Northwestern Sec 

Alliance * 

Fort Robinson 

Hay Springs 

Kennedy 

Kirkwood * 

Springview 

Valentine 



Counties. 



Holt 

Washington. 

Platte 

Knox 

Dodge 

Cedar 

Boyd 

Madison 

...do 

Antelope 

Douglas 

Holt. 

Knox 

Stanton 

Burt 

Dixon 

Cuming 



York 

Saunders 

Nemaha 

Hamilton ... 

Oage 

Saline 

Butler 

Richardson . 

Clay 

Jefferson 

Fillmore — 

Clay 

Thayer 

Lancaster... 

Otoe 

Gage 

Richardson . 

Seward 

Nuckolls 

Johnson 

Otoe 

Cass 

York 



Boone 

Custer 

Sherman — 

Custer 

Garfield 

Custer 

Merrick 

Blaine 

Wheeler 

Platte 

Dawson 

Hall 

Greeley 

Buffalo 

Dawson 

Sherman 

Vallev 

Buffalo 

Howard 



Harlan 

Furnas 

...do 

Dundy 

Webster 

Frontier 

Franklin 

Adams 

Phelps 

Chase 

Red Willow. 

Perkins 

Kearney 

Webster 

Harlan 

Furnas 



Cheyenne ... 
Scotts Bluff. 

Kimball 

Cheyenne . . . 

Logan 

Lincoln 

Thomas 

...do 

Grant 



Box Butte . . 

Dawes 

Sheridan 

Cherry 

Rock 

Keya Paha . . 
Cherry 



, 100 

,051 
,792 
.235 
,363 
,619 

945 
,722 
,3i6 
,633 
,812 
,458 
,'99 

94 1 
,278 

842 
,435 
,574 
,i'3 
,214 
,080 
,642 

i,747 
2,3^7 
2,061 

2,477 
2,180 

2,555 
1,708 
2,621 
2,029 
>,584 
2.557 
1,860 
2,010 
2, 146 
2,385 
2,067 
1,961 
2,028 
i>79° 

1,939 
2,173 
2,147 
2,968 
i,9"7 
2,553 
1,820 

■,932 

2.324 
3.278 
2,506 
3,294 
2, 169 
1,687 
1,939 



Temperature, in degrees Fahrenheit. 



4,697 
3,820 



2,841 
2,971 
2,842 
3,588 

3,968 
3,764 
3,821 



2,613 



21.8 
21.6 
24.4 
20.6 
21.0 
21.4 
20.0 
21.4 
20.2 

20.6 

22.0 

22.0 
23.0 
22.0 

20. 5 
20.8 
21.2 

22.7 
22.0 
22.8 
25.O 
21.6 
23.4 
21.8 
24.8 

27-9' 
24.O 
23.6 
25.6 
23.8 
23.2 



23.1 
26.4 
22.5 

24-5 
26.4 
21.5' 
18.9 
23.8 

23-4' 
28.1 
24.0 
22.6 



24.7 

22.8 
22.0 

18.8 

23-7 
25.0 
25-4 



28.9 
26.7 

21.8 

24.2 
25.8 
27.2 

27.8' 
25-9 
28.5 
25.2 
25.8 
29.6 



3 o 



-4.0 



-3-8 
— 3-° 
-4.8 
-2.5 
—5-7 



—3-7 
—7.0 
-4.6 
—4.1 
+ 1.8 
—2-7 
—6.8 



-6.9 

-5-6 
-9-8 



-8.4 
-4-5 
-5-9 



—7-2 
— 2.2 

—7-4 
-6.7 



-9.6 
—8.6 
—3-0 
—4-9 

—7-4 
—5-5 



-7-8 
-8.1 
-0.7 



-6.7 



—0.9 
—3-3 



—3-9 

-4-' 



—4.2 



24-7 
24.2 
26.6 
28.6 
24.4 
25.8 
20.9 



25-5 
22.6 



23-1 

23- 2 b 
23.8 

25-5 
23.6 
22.3 
24.0 

20.0 
23-4 
21.4 
23-3 
21.2 
21.0 



—2-3 
—3-5 

—2.8 



—2.8 
—2.7 



-6.4 



-5-6 
—4.0 
-6.4 



-5-6 

—4-4 



26t 



—14 



—17 



38 



46 



35 



Precipitation, in inches. 






°-35 
0.20 
o. 11 

0-35 
0.70 
0.25 
0.07 
0.16 
0.42 
0.44 
0.31 
0.05 
0.27 
0.44 
0.60 
0.20 
0.04 

o-33 
o. 16 
1.72 
0.32 
0.74 
0.60 
0.40 
1.27 
0.58 
0.90 
0.75 
0.38 
0.94 
0.48 



0.70 
1.04 
0.72 
0.60 

..15* 
1.06 
1.04 
0.80 

0.20 
0.20 
0.09 

T. 
0.65 

T. 
0.25 



0.20 
0.15 
o. 11 
0.44 
T. 



0.35 
T. 
0.30 
o.37 
o. 12 

0.04 
0.08 
0.06 
T. 
0-39 
0.16 



0.24 
T. 
0.92 

0.15 
0.20 
0.30 

o-73 
0.05 
0.00 

0-35 



o-55 
0.50 
0.13 
0.03 
°-'5 
o-i5 
o. 10 

0.00 

0-51 
0.62 
0.40 
0.24 
I. 00 
0-37 



s 

«! 

So 



—0.15 



—0.66 
—0-39 
— °-39 
— 1.03 
—0.30 
— o-54 
— 0.22 
—0.28 
— 0.70 
— 0.64 
— 0.16 
— 0.50 
—0.23 
—0.88 
— 1. 00 

—0.23 
— 0.52 
+0.78 
— 0.17 
—0.44 
— o. 01 
— 0.42 
+0.28 
— o. 16 

+ 0.22 
+ 0.01 
—O.48 
+ O.29 
— 0.27 



+ 0.06 

— o. 05 

— O. 02 
— O. OI 

+Q-35 
+ 0.13 
+0.25 
+0. 22 



— 0.22 
—0.32 



+0.158 
—0.36 
— o. 50 



-0.24 
-0.74 
-"•33 
-0.58 



-0.58 
-0.41 



-0.18 
-0.31 



—0.28 
—0.48 
— 0.21 
— 0.09 

— 0.24 



—0.47 
— 0.65 
+0.3S 
—0.27 
—0-34 
—0.46 
+ 0.17 
— 0.29 
—0.49 



+0.03 



—0-35 
—0.51 
—0.25 
—0.87 
—0.44 

—0.30 
—0.15 
— 0.07 
-0.15 



+ 0.66 
— c.08 



0.25 
0.07 
0.07 
0.20 
0.40 
0.20 
0.07 
0.08 
°-33 
o-39 
o. 14 
0.05 
0.14 
0.24 
0.40 
0. 11 
0.04 

0.20 
0.08 

°-75 
0.25 
0.74 
0.30 

0-35 
0.76 
0.58 
0.90 
0.50 
o. 20 
0.70 
0.26 



1 .00 
0.50 
0.20 
o-59 
0.58 
0.58 
0.50 

0.20 
o. 10 
0.06 

T. 
0.60 

T. 
0.20 



0.20 
o. 11 
0. 10 
0.22 
T. 
o. 10 

%' 5 
T. 

o. 20 

0.12 

0. 10 

0.04 
0.05 
0.05 
T 

0.20 
o. 16 



013 
T. 

0.50 

0.15 
0.20 
o. 12 
0.50 
0.05 
0.00 

o. 10 



0.30 

0.20 
0.07 
0.02 
o. 10 
o. 10 

0. 10 

0.00 

0.15 

0.21 

0.30 

0.20 
1. 00 

0.21 






3-° 
1-7 
°-5 
2.0 
4.0 

2-5 

0.8 

3-0 
5-5 

5-5 



0-5 
4-5 
6.0 
6.0 
2.0 
°-5 

3-o 



6.5 
0.8 



4-5 
3-5 



1.6 

T. 

5-° 

3-8 

2-7 

2-5 



0.4 
2.2 

6.0 
3-° 
4-5 
8.0 
8.0 



2.0 
2.0 
2.0 

T. 
6-5 

T. 
2.5 



2.0 

1.6 

1.0 

3-0 

T. 

1.0 

2.0 

T. 

3-0 

2-5 

1.0 

0.9 
0.8 

T. 
T. 

4.0 



T- 5 

4.2 

1-5 
2.0 
2.9 
1-3 
0-5 
0.0 

3-5 



5-5 
5-° 
1.0 



'•5 
1-5 
1.0 

0.0 
5- ' 
5-8 
4.0 
2.2 
10.0 
3-7 



Sky. 



.CO 



■2 3 



el s 

3 « 3 



■a 
3 
o 



"S* 



nw. 

sw. 

sw. 

s. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

sw. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

n. 

sw. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

n. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 



sw. 



nw. 
nw. 



nw. 
nw. 
nw. 



nw. 
nw. 
nw. 
nw. 
nw. 
sw. 



n. 

nw. 

nw. 

n. 

s. 

w. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

n. 

nw. 



nw. 
nw. 
nw. 
nw. 
nw. 



nw. 



nw. 
sw. 
nw. 



nw. 
nw. 



nw. 



nw. 
nw. 
nw. 
nw. 
n. 

nw. 

w. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 



Observers. 



R.E.Bowden. 

E. A. Palmer. 
C.C.Gray. 

Dr. Geo. Roberts. 

Wm. J. Phillips. 

T. B.A.Watson. 

C.C.Irwin. 

Dr. F.A.Long. 

Dr. P. H.Salter. 

G.S.C'lingman. 

U. S. Weather Bureau. 

O.M.Collins. 

W.H.Hamlin. 

W.Gerecke. 

Dr. A. D. Nesbit. 

I. H. Weaver. 

C.J.Kadish. 

E.D.Smith. 

Dr.A.S. vMansfelde. 

G.D.Carrington. 

H.C.Miller. 

C. Kellam. 

Doane College. 

E.B.Taylor. 

M.L.Libbee. 

L.L. Fuller. 

W.F.Cramb. 

F.M.Flory. 

Dr. J. T.Fleming. 

Dr.C.M.Easton. 

U. S. Weather Bureau. 

E.Morton. 

I.B.Huffman. 

W.F. Gingrich. 

L.E.Ost. 

L.W.Hahn. 

C.M.Miller. 

Wm.N. Hunter. 

G. Treat. 

O.P. Lowry. 

F. A.Pettinger. 
Chas. I{. Hare. 
F. Kein. 
H.L.Ormsby. 
W.S.Green. 
Geo.B.Mair. 
J.A.McRae. 
E.E.Bolejack. 
A.Dahl. 

Geo. S. Truman. 

A.V.Carlson. 

E.Corbin. 

J. A.Pinkerton. 

c.E.Magner. 

Ira P.Gnswold. 

E.S.Hayhurst. 

J.E.Goodrich. 

Erastus Smith. 

Paul Anderson. 

R.E. Pitcher. 
J F.Edwards. 
C.G.George. 
W.E. Winger. 
C.S. Draper. 
Dr. S.R. Razee. 
F.T.Owen. 
J.C.Swarts. 

C. Engstrom. 
Robert Malcolm. 
C.T.Watson. 
John McKenzie. 
Joel Hull. 
W.K.Hayes. 
W.Burdon. 

D. F. Hostetter. 

Robt. II. Willis. 

J.P.Finley. 

F.J. Bellows. 

A.B.Persinger. 

G.E.Bolkrom. 

IT. S. Weather Bureau. 

D.McNall. 

O.G.Norton. 

F.D.Gallup. 

J.Kridelbaugh. 
Post surgeon. 

C. A. Waterman. 

D. A.Piercy. 
Mrs.C. A. Arter. 
Miss Ezada Phelps. 
C.s. Weather Bureau. 



* Temperature data from thermometers not self registering. t Occurred on more than one day. », \ °, etc., indicate number of days missing from observed readings. 
All records are used in determining State or district means, but State and district departures are determined by comparison of current data of only stations with normals. 

X From record of L.E.Pratt. 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



December, 1898. 



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a 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



December, 1898. 















Daily precipitation for Nebraska, 


Oecemt 


er, 


1898. 


























stations. 


Day of month. 




i. 


2. 


3- 


4- 


5- 


6. 


7- 


8. 


9- 


10. 


11. 


12. 


'3- 


14. 


'5- 


16. 


■7- 


18. 


19- 


20. 


21. 


22. 


23- 


24. 


25- 


26. 


27. 


28. 


29. 


30. 


3'- 


3 








. IO 


t 


.20 


+ 


t 


t 


t 








t 
















t 






t 






t 






■25 




t 


0-35 
0.20 
0.00 
0.20 
0.08 




























































































.10 






















































.10 

•05 

. 10 
















.01 




.02 
















































.20 
.08 
.65 
•°5 






























■°3 




















































.08 












t 


t 




°-33 
0. 16 
1.72 
0.32 
0.74 
0.06 




































•75 




■32 
•25 

• 74 














t 

.02 




























































































































.01 


t 








































t 






















t 




•03 
.02 


.02 




t 


t 
























.07 


•°3 












+ 


.02 




.02 
t 


■03 

•°5 

•°5 
• 04 




0.20 
0.39 

t 
0.65 

t 
o-35 
0. 11 

o.35 
0.60 
0.07 
0.16 
0.40 
























.20 


•'5 




























































.60 




























































t 








t 
t 


























t 
















+ 








t 




.10 


t 
t 
.07 

t 


. 10 










t 














. 10 


































t 


.07 


























.20 
• '5 




























t 










.04 


.04 








































t 


•3° 


•15 
•°5 
.16 












t 


t 
















.02 




































































































•35 
































t 


















■°5 


































































































•58 


























0.58 






.20 




























































































.90 
























t 




0.90 
0.60 








t 






























.20 




.40 


















































































































































.40 
■5° 
































•°5 








t 






• 25 






"t 

.04 












t 
.11 


































•25 




0.70 






















































°-75 


























































0.15 






.IO 










t 


























.01 
















t 


t 
.07 


t 
•05 




0. 11 






.22 
































•15 




































































0.44 
t 
0.25 
0.38 
0.24 








.20 
.20 
.06 


t 




•°5 














































































. 10 




.08 

•13 
















t 




































t 






































































•'5 


•°5 

. 10 




.20 




t 


























t 


.06 

•'7 
















.21 


.02 




0.62 
0.94 
0.68 
t 
0.92 
0. 10 
0.40 

0-55 
0.24 

o-35 
0.48 
0.50 
+ 

0.07 
0.92 


























■70 
























.08 




























•5° 






















t 








t 












































+ 






•5° 










.20 










.02 
















t 
















.20 






. 10 


















































•3° 




















































. 10 
.20 
.02 
. 10 

t 
.10 

t 

t 

•35 
• 03 
.20 

t 

t 
•°5 


.01 
.10 










•05 
































•30 






















.20 




.02 


t 


t 

. 10 

+ 
.10 








































































•'5 
.04 


















t 


t 

■ 07 
•35 

t 


• 17 








t 
. 10 






















.26 


.20 




t 












































































































t 


t 


































t 

t 






t 


.14 
































.08 












.08 








•°5 
























































































0.20 

0-15 
0.32 
0.30 


















•15 


























t 

.02 
.12 






















.20 
■°5 






























t 
t 






t 

t 


t 














.08 


























































































•3° 




































•85 

t 






















'•IS 
0.13 
0.42 
0.30 
0.03 
0.44 
0.70 
0.31 
0.05 














t 
.08 


.07 

t 








t 
































.06 


.01 










•33 






t 
t 






















t 




t 
t 
















.20 

t 
•39 
























t 








.10 




North Platte . 










t 


.02 


























t 










.01 
•°3 


t 

.02 


+ 












.02 




























t 








t 






































.70 
.10 
















t 




.14 
































.01 






t 




+ 




•°3 




.01 
•05 






t 
































































t 


















.02 
























:::: :: 






























t 






t 


































































.10 


. 10 
■°5 






t 




t 


t 
























.12 




.10 


t 










•°5 




.08 


o-37 
0-73 
0.05 
1.04 






















•05 
1. 00 


































Rulo 






.04 
. 10 

•15 
























































St Paul ... 






















































t 

t 

t 


.02 

t 










•30 




























1. 00 


•34 

+ 




















1-79 
0.27 






•13 


.14 


t 












t 
























t 




















































.20 































































. 10 




















































-°5 






0-'5 
0.72 






. 12 
1. 00 
.24 
.20 
.20 
































.10 




•5" 
































































































































.20 
. 10 






0.44 
0.92 
0.60 
'■'5 






































.20 
.20 
•59 




.42 






















.20 

•35 


















































































.21 
















t 
•°5 

.12 










.40 

•32 

.04 
.04 
•58 










































.20 
1 
.21 

. 1 1 














t 
t 






















t 


•58 




. 11 






















.10 




t 


.0] 


.01 








t 














t 






t 


t 




0-37 
























•°5 
•30 

t 














































.04 
















1.04 
0.04 
0. 10 
0.87 






.04 

t 






t 


t 


























+ 












t 
.10 
























































.22 






























.40 




•25 














































































.20 
































. 10 




•5° 






















0.80 



























































* From record of L.E.Pratt. 



t Trace (when precipitation is less than o.oi of an inch). 



missing. 










U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. 



ANNUAL SUMMARY, 1898. 



NEBRASKA SECTION 



OP- THE 



CLIMATE AND CROP SERVICE 



OF THE 



WEATHER BUREAU. 



PUBLISHED BY AUTHORITY OF THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE. 



UNDER DIRECTION OF 

WILLIS L. MOORE 

CHIEF OF WEATHER BUREAU 
]>Y 

G. A. hOVEhAND, 

SECTION DIRECTOR, 

Office, University of Nebraska, bincolp. 




Natural Histo.v li 



X 

OS 



X 

G 



CD 



< 
> 

a. 
G 
< 

C 

32 



<5 

P 

55 
55 

«< 

55 

< 

S 



N*" .£ 



cO 







«o 



•O 



Year 1898. 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



3 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, 

Climate and Crop Service 

OF I'll E 

WEATHER BUREAU. 

CENTRAL OFFICE: WASHINGTON, D. C. 



NEBRASKA SECTION, 

G. A. LOVELAND, Section Director, 

LINCOLN, NEBR. 



Vol. III. 



LINCOLN, NEBR. 



No. 13. 



SUMMARY OF CROP CONDITIONS FOR 1898. 

A review of the growing season was given in the October 
Report; therefore, no detailed account will be given here, but 
rather a summary of the season as a whole. 

The fall of 1897 was exceptionally favorable for fall-sown 
grain, and the crops entered the winter in excellent condi- 
tion. The precipitation for the last three months of 1897 
was 2.17 inches above the normal, and for the first three 
months of 1898, 0.81 of an inch below the normal. This 
shows an excess in precipitation of 1.36 inches for the six 
months preceding April 1, 1898. Fall-sown grain started to 
grow in the last days of February or early in March, with 
the ground moist and in excellent condition. The precipita- 
tion during the next three months, the growing period of 
small grain, was 0.57 of an inch above the normal and well 
distributed through the period. A large crop of small grain 
resulted from these favorable conditions. This period was 
also the time for the corn to start growing, and the crop was 
in fine condition on the 1st of July. The deficiency in pre- 
cipitation in July averaged for the State 1.30 inches, but in 
many southern counties the deficiency was from 3 to 4 
inches, and corn was much damaged in all except a few 
northern counties, where the rainfall was sufficient. August 
and September were both months of deficient precipitation, 
the deficiency being 0.79 of an inch for the two months. 

The average and normal temperature and rainfall for the 
five months of the crop season, by sections, are as follows: 



Sections. 


Temperature. 


Rainfall. 


Mean. 


Average. 


Mean. 


Average. 




66.8 
65-3 
65.1 
66.9 
61.9 
62.6 

64.8 


67.4 
65.7 
65.6 
67.2 
63.7 
62.8 

65-4 


17.26 
16.91 
14.08 
15-54 
12.97 
12.70 

14.91 


"9-54 

18.46 
16.36 
16.90 
12.30 






Southwestern 






16.40 





The temperature for the crop season was slightly above 
the normal in all months except May, during which month 
there was an average daily deficiency of 2.1°. 



CLIMATOLOGY OF THE YEAR 1898. 
ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE. 

The average atmospheric pressure for the State was 30.04 



inches, which is about the normal. The highest barometer 
was 31.10 inches, at North Platte on December 9, and the 
lowest was 29.33 inches, at North Platte on October 1. This 
makes the yearly range for the State 1.77 inches. 

TEMPERATURE. 

The mean annual temperature for the State was 48.5°, 
which is 0.3° above the normal. The mean temperature for 
December, the coldest month, was 23.5°, and for August, the 
warmest month, 74.2°. The lowest temperature was 22° 
below zero, at Lodgepole on December 8 and at Hay Springs 
and Camp Clarke on December 9, and the highest was 109°, 
at Franklin on June 24 and at Camp Clarke on August 21. 
The average local annual range of temperature, as com- 
puted from the records of 89 stations, for the sections and 
State was as follows: Southeastern, 115°; northeastern, 114°; 
central, 116°; southwestern, 113°; western, 118°; northwest- 
ern, 119°; State, 116°. The greatest annual range was 131°, 
at Camp Clarke, and the least was 99°, at Wilber. The great- 
est daily local range of temperature was 72°, at Tecumseh in 
November. 

PRECIPITATION (RAIN AND MELTED SNOW). 

The average total precipitation over the State for the year 
was 20.70 inches, which is 2.65 inches below the normal. 
The greatest total precipitation was 40.25 inches, at Nemaha, 
and the least was 8.30 inches, at Whitman. The greatest 
monthly average for the State was 4.86 inches, in May, and 
the least was 0.32 of an inch, in December. The greatest 
local monthly precipitation was 11.53 inches, at Plattsmouth 
in July, and the least was none, at several western stations in 
December. The greatest amount recorded as falling in 
twenty-four consecutive hours was 10.69 inches, at Platts- 
mouth on the 6th and 7th of July. 

SNOW (UNMELTED). 

The following chart shows the distribution of snowfall (in 
inches) over the State for the year 1898: 




/0 20. 2o 

Scale of shades (in inches): 

d b m m 



2o 3o 



Under 20. 20 to 30. 30 to 40. 40 to 50. Over 50. 

The average total snowfall was 25.2 inches, which is about 
5.0 inches above the average of the past ten years. 

WIND. 

The prevailing direction of the wind was from the north- 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION 



Year 1898. 



west. The average velocity over the State was 8.(3 miles an 
hour, which is about the normal. 

Uonthly means for 1898. 



Months. 



January . . 
February. 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 
Se |>tem her 
October . . . 
November, 
December 



Mean 
barome- 
ter. 



3°- '3 
30.16 
30.06 
3°. °7 
29 -93 
29.91 

29- 95 
29.92 
29.96 
30. c.6 
30.08 
30.24 



Temperature. 



Mean. 



3«- 6 
35- ° 
48.0 

70.4 
74.0 
74-2 
63.6 
46.9 
3'-4 
23-5 



Aver- 
age.* 



19.7 
24.8 
34-i 
47-8 
59-3 
69.9 
74-8 
74.0 
63.4 
50. c 
34-3 
25.8 



Average 

wind 
velocity 



6.8 

8.7 
10. o 
9-i 

8.9 
8.8 
8.1 
7-4 
8.5 
10.2 
8.9 
8.0 



Precipitation. 





Aver- 




age.* 


0.67 


0.67 


0.43 


0.67 


0.61 


1. 18 


2.14 


2.45 


4.86 


3-62 


3-54 


3-90 


2. 12 


3-42 


2.24 


2-59 


2.30 


1.86 


0.90 


1.56 


0.57 


0.69 


0.32 


0.68 



Snow. 



3-i 
3-6 
°-3 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
o. o 

2.0 

6.1 
3-" 



* For past twenty-three years. 
Means for the six equal sections of the State. 





Temperature. 


Precipitation. 


Number of days- 


Sections. 


Mean. 


Aver- 
age.* 


Mean. 


Aver- 
age. + 


Snow. 


Rainy. 


Clear. 


Partly 
cloudy. 


Cloudy. 


Southeast... 
Northeast. .. 

Central 

Southwest . . 

West 

Northwest .. 

State 


50. 4 
48.4 
48.8 
5°-5 
46.5 
46.2 

48.5 


5"- ' 
47.8 
47-9 
49-9 
47-9 
46.4 


26.73 
23-74 
19.28 
22.23 
16.65 
i.S-57 
20.70 


29.20 
27.24 
23-79 
23-79 
17-35 
18.36 


31.0 

28.5 
22. 2 
14.9 
24.6 
29.9 

25.2 


62.6 
68.6 
52.4 
45-5 
49-4 
50.7 

54-9 


176.0 
179.2 
206.2 

184.5 
212.0 
214.6 

195-4 


114. 6 
108.7 
87.0 
108.6 
89.0 
82.8 
98.4 


73-6 
78.0 
70.2 
71.1 
63.6 
67.6 

70.7 



* For ten years. t For twenty years. 

Wind and humidity table. 



Stations. 



Lincoln 

North Platte 
Omaha 



Wind. 



Miles. Mean. Max. Dir. Date 



96,990 
82,666 
69,398 



11. 1 
9-4 
7-9 



nw. 
w. 



Mar. 21 
May 17 
May 20 



Humidity. 



Mean. 



Low- 
est. 



Date. 



Sept. 3 
Apr. 15 
Apr. 9 



Supplemental precipitation table. 



Stations. 



Alma 

Benedict 

Burchard 

Burwell 

Camp Clarke... 

Cody 

Culbertson 

Eden 

Elba 

Ewing 

Fairfield 

Gordon 

Greeley 

Haigler 

Hayes Center .. 

Hickman 

Hooper 

Johnstown 

Lyons 

McCool Junct'n 

Marquette 

Merriman 

Monroe 

Ord 

Osceola 

Ough 

Palmer 

Plattsmouth . . 

St. Libory 

Schuyler 

Sioux City, la.. 

Stockham 

Stratton 

Syracuse 

Tablerock 

Valparaiso 

Wakefield 

Willard 

Wisner 

Wvmore 

Yankton. S.D .. 



o. 19 
0.92 
1-25 
1. 00 

1.20 
0.60 
0.40 
1.70 
O.80 
O.70 



0.20 

0-55 
O.OO 
0.45 
O.87 
O.38 

0-35 
0.42 
0.40 
0.4! 
0.40 

0-3' 
0.60 
°.°5 
0.20 
0.40 
0.85 
0.38 
0.40 

0.2' 
O.80 

o. 17 
1-75 



0.36 
1.60 
0.74 

■•15 
0.34 



0.20 
o-55 
°-95 
0.31 
T. 
0.02 
0.00 
2.85 

o-55 
0.20 
0.21 
o. 10 
0.50 

T 

0.25 
1-73 
0.8; 

T. 
0.60 
0.50 
0.50 

T. 
0.30 
o.34 
o-35 

T. 
0.50 
0.22 
0.80 
0.15 
0.3 
0.60 
0.00 
0.92 
2. 11 
0.2s 
0.58 

f. 
0.2c 

1-45 

0.74 



0.17 

0-95 
2.25 
0.05 

o-75 
0.80 
0. 24 
1.69 
0.31 
1. 18 
0.36 

O. 10 
0.20 
O.7O 
0.40 
I.85 

1-51 

0-33 
1.24 
0.70 
0.50 

0. 20 
0.47 
0.22 
1. 00 
0.45 
0.85 
o.95 
0.65 

o-73 
0.90 
0.5c 
0.24 
1.72 
2.05 
0.85 

1 . 22 
0.07 
1.81 
1-95 



3-25 

3-°i 

2-35 

1.68 

1.07 

1.60 

2. 10 

3-24 

1. 20 

1. 41 

5-40 

0.60 

1-15 

3 

3-65 

5-12 

2.01 

0.85 

1.66 

3.62 

2. 12 

1.20 



2.09 

1.96 
3.80 
1. 

3-07 
2.09 
0-95 
1-3; 
2.90 
3-23 
4-44 
2.70 
3-07 
1.25 
2-13 
'•52 
4-37 
1.13 



6.36 

3-99 

6.90 

3-14 

4. 22 

4-95 

3 

6.13 



3-8i 
4.29 
5-55 
3-64 
3-38 
3- 25 
5-33 
5-57 
6.05 
4-99 
4.24 
3-85 
6.80 
5-39 
3-43 
3-68 

5-5° 
3.38 
4.15 
4-36 
6.78 
4.69 
3.00 
4-53 
4.96 
6.29 
7-15 

5-02 

3.6. 

3-95 
5-29 



4-49 
4.91 
3-95 



0.60 

3 

5-9° 

6.05 

2.42 

3-59 

1.06 

6 

4 

3-85 

2-51 

6.3" 

2.05 

6.23 

5-23 

6.46 

0.40 

4-39 

2.3' 

5.06 

3- 24 

8.12 

4.17 

5-36 

7.01 

6.61 

4-3° 

2.86 

3 

5-35 

5-04 

6.78 

3-°5 
6.91 
2.51 

4.08 



2.09 
0.30 
1-95 
2-33 
2.13 
2.90 
1.44 
3-24 
1. 10 
3-3° 
0.60 
2.26 
0.90 
1.20 
1.85 
1.25 
0.64 
4.19 
0.46 
0.25 
0.62 
0.80 
1.25 
0.91 
0.40 
1.28 
0.9 
H-53 
1.49 
0.27 
2.78 
0.80 

2. 52 
2.83 
2-35 

T. 

2.08 
1.60 
1.02 

1.78 
4-35 



2.34 
0.96 

'•55 
4.68 
1.01 



1-34 
2.16 



5-93 

3 

0.60 

1.65 

1-75 

1.24 

2-15 

2.70 
1. 71 
4-45 
3-85 
1-74 
2. 00 
2.85 
2.04 
2.86 
1.92 
3.65 
i-3° 
1-47 
3-72 
3-ic 
4-9" 
0.71 
2. of 
1.6; 
1-5- 
1.67 
3-46 
■•7' 
2.07 
1.71 



5-69 
2.21 
4.70 
0.86 
0.30 
0.50 
3-90 
5-77 
2.40 
0.72 

4-5° 

1.40 

1.80 

3 

3- 65 

2.50 

2.07 

0-39 

1.6" 

2.79 

2.44 

0.00 

1.68 

2-75 

1. 91 

3- 80 

3 
2.40 

3-3° 
2-51 
0.95 

7 

4.48 

2.9. 

7-i 

2.5: 

1. 10 

1.98 

1. 19 

3-49 

1-2.5 



0.25 
1.64 
1-77 
0.56 
6.46 
T 
2.52 
1.70 
1-05 
i.cS 
2.00 



T 

0.80 



1.70 
1. 61 

T. 
2. 10 
1.83 
1. 10 

T. 
1. 01 
0.56 
1. 71 
0.40 
0.66 



o.77 
1.86 
1.36 
0.90 
0.85 
1.65 
2.71 
1.67 
1.71 
0.25 
2-3' 
0.65 
1.27 



0.85 
0.90 
0.60 
0.30 
0.85 
T. 
0-37 
0.60 
0.30 
0.70 
0.85 



0.30 
T. 

0.60 
0.50 
0.68 

0-15 
0.9 

0.50 
0.90 

o-55 
0.42 
0.2; 

°-55 
0.30 

°-35 
1.28 
0.50 
0.50 
0.45 
0.27 

O. 2Q 
O.85 
O.96 

0.45 
O.74 
0.43 



1.49 
O. 25 



O.04 
O.49 
0.43 
O.65 

°-35 
o. 10 
0.07 
1.70 
0.05 
0.05 
0.30 
o. 10 

T. 

T. 

T. 
0.68 
0.23 
0. 12 
0.92 
0-55 
0.32 
o. 10 
0.13 
0.43 
0.02 

T. 

T. 
0.50 
0.40 
o. 20 
o.c6 



0.18 
1.04 
1.66 
1.67 
0.20 
0.01 



0.98 
o. 10 



25.92 
20.83 
28.65 
18.23 

20.02 
12.87 
I9.70 
36.68 



21.50 



16.81 
I8.29 



26. 19 
24. 58 
16. 19 
25.66 
24.46 
21.02 

12.45 
20.68 
■5-95 
19-55 
20.89 
24.04 



21-57 
25.08 
22.91 



20.06 
28.34 



COMPARISON OF PAST YEARS. 



The monthly maximum and mini 
tions have been obtained for the ye 
table has been revised, and differs si 
previously published : 



muni temperatures for several sta- 
ars 1876 to 1888, and the following 
ightly from the comparative tables 



1876 (7.6 

1877 48.5 

1878 49-4 

1879 48.6 

1880 47.4 

1881 48.0 

1882 49.2 

1883 45.7 

[884 |6.s 

1885 47.4 

1886 47.6 

1887 47-5 

1888 47.3 



^-Tem perature .— * 
Mean. Max. Min. 



103 
107 
103 
100 

105 
104 
106 
109 
101 
100 
no 

106 

105 



—25 

— i6 

— 16 

—27 
—26 



—34 
—39 
— 27 
—33 
—32 
-36 



Prec . 

22.64 
25-34 
25.07 

24-39 
21.23 
30.91 
23-51 
3"- 74 
24.00 
25.98 
23-71 
22.99 
22.86 



^-Temperature.—. 

Mean. Max. Min. 

1S89 49.3 HI — 27 

1890 49-3 112 —34 

1891 47-7 no —38 

1892 47-7 113 —42 

1893 47.6 no —28 

1894 50.0 114 —38 

1895 48.6 no —34 

1896 49.4 109 — 22 

1897 49-1 1'3 —26 

1898 48.5 109 — 22 

Average for the 

State for past 

23 years 48.2 107 —29 



Prec. 

22.64 
17.18 
30.62 
24. 12 
16.80 
13-30 
18.70 
26. 19 
23.50 



VOLUNTARY OBSERVERS. 



Stations. 



24.94 
22.80 



27.09 
21.42 



Agee 

Albion 

Alliance 

Alma 

Ansley 

Arapahoe 

Arborville 

Ashland 

Do 

Ashton 

Auburn 

Aurora 

Bart ley 

Bassett 

Beatrice 

Beaver City 

Bellevue 

Benedict 

Benkleman — 

Blair 

Blue Hill 

Bradshaw 

Brokenbow — 
Burchard 

Burwell 

Callaway 

Clatonia 

Camp Clarke . . 

Central City 

Chester 

Cody 

Columbus 

Creighton 

Crete 

Culbertson 

Curtis 

Dannebrog 

David City 

Dawson 

Divide 

Dunning 

Eden 

Edgar 

Elba 

Ericson 

Ewing 

Fairbury 

Fairfield 

Fairmont 

Fort Robinson.. 

Franklin 

Fremont 

Geneva 

Genoa 

tiering 

Gordon 

Gothenburg 
Grand Island .. . 

Do 

Greeley 

Haigler 

Hartington 

Harvard 

Hastings 

Hayes Center.. . 

Hay Springs 

Hebron 

Hickman 

Hooper 

Holdrege 

Imperial 

Johnstown 

Kearney 

Kennedy 

Kimball 

Kirkwood 

Lexington 

Lincoln 

Do 

Do 



Observers. 



R.E.Bowden. 

F. A.Pettinger. 
T. Kridelbaugh. 
R.E. Pitcher. 
Chas.R. Hare. 
J.F.Edwards. 
E.D.Smith. 

Dr. A.S. v Mansfelde. 

O.C.Steele. 

F.Rein. 

G. D.Carrington. 
H.C.Miller. 
R.S.Baker. 

A. H. Gale. 

C.Kellam. 

C.G.George. 

E.F.Stouffer. 

R.B. Brabham. 

W.E. Winger. 

Dr. E. A. Palmer. 

C.S. Draper. 

E.C.Roggy. 

H.L.Ormsby. 

J. A. Kinsey. 

W'. S.Green. 

Geo.B.Mair. 

F.W.Jones. 

Robt. H.Willis. 

J.A.McRae. 

W.J.Kissick. 

G.M. Heiney. 

C. C.Gray. 

Dr. Geo. Roberts. 

Doane College. 

Mrs.L.A. Wibley. 

Dr. S.R. Razee. 

W.J.Melson. 

E.B.Taylor. 

M.L.Libbee. 

M.H.Smith. 

L. L. Williams. 

D.J.Wood. 

S.S. Fuller. 

S. M. Wellraan. 

A.Dahl. 

G. H.Benson. 

W.F Cramb. 

M.L.Jones. 

G.H.Borden. 

Post Surgeon. 

F.T.Owen. 

Wm. J. Phillips. 

F.M.Flory. 

Geo.S. Truman. 

J . P. Finlev. 

A. Burwell. 

A.V.Carlson. 

E. Cor bin. 

Thomas Connor. 

J. A.Pinkerton. 

T. P.F. ilame. 

T. B.A.Watson. 

Dr. J. T.Fleming. 

J. C.S warts. 

R.C.Orr. 

c. A. Waterman. 

Dr.C. M.Easton. 

O.O.Franklin. 

T.W. Lyman. 

C.Engstrom. 

R. Molcolm. 

F.Avery. 

C.E. Magner. 

D.A.Piercy. 

F.J. Bellows. 

Mrs.C. A. Arter. 

Ira P.Griswold. 

U.S. Weather Bureau 

C.W.Ernst. 

H.F.Bethune. 



Stations. 



Lodgepole 

Loup 

Do 

Lynch 

Lyons 

McCook 

McCool Junction 

Madison 

Madrid 

Marquette 

Merriman 

Minden 

Do 

Monroe 

Nebraska City — 
I Do 

Nemaha 

Nesbit 

Norfolk 

Norman 

i North Loup 

! North Platte .... 

Oakdale 

Odell : 

i Omaha 

O'Neill 

Ord 

Osceola 

Ough 

Palmer 

Palmyra 

Plattsmouth 

Pleasanthill 

Ravenna 

Do 

Red Cloud 

Do 

Republican 

Rulo 

St. Libory 

St. Paul 

1 Salem 

Santee Agency .. 

Sargent 

Schuyler 

Seneca 

: Seward 

Sioux City, Iowa 

Spragg 

Springview 

Stanton 

! Stockham 

Strang 

Stratton 

Superior 

Sutton 

Syracuse 

Tablerock 

Tecumseh 

Do 

Tekamah 

Thedford 

Turlington 

Valentine 

Valparaiso 

Wakefield 

Wallace 

Wauneta 

Weeping Water . 

Welltleet 

West Point 

Whitman 

Wilber 

Willard 

Wilson ville 

Wisner 

Wymore 

Yankton, S.Dak.. 

York 



Observers. 



A.B.Persinger. 

A.F.Werts. 

A.S.Hayhurst. 

C.C.Irwin. 

N.R.Kellam. 

C.T.Watson. 

F.E.Porter. 

Dr. F.A.Long. 

John McKenzie. 

John Ellis. 

F. ilassong. 
Joel Hull. 

Dr. H.Hapeman. 

Wm. Webster. 

R.R.Douglas. 

E. Morton. 

R.J. Duff. 

G.E.Bolkrom. 

Dr. P. II. Salter. 

J.F.Barnes. 

J. E. Goodrich. 

U.S. Weather Bureau. 

G.S.Clingman. 

I.B.Huffman. 

U.S. Weather Bureau. 

Chas. N.Cole. 

Jas. Milford. 

G. W.Murbarger. 
Wm.Ough. 
E.H.Smith. 
W.D.Bancroft. 
W.S.Picket. 

J. W. Ingles. 

Erastus Smith. 

C.S.Bukey. 

G.M.Stevens. 

D.F.Trunkey. 
I W.Burdon. 

W.F.Gingrich. 

W.I.Meader. 

Paul Anderson. 
! W.W.McDermit. 

W.H. Hamlin. 

J.S.Spooner. 

L.N.Dickinson. 

D. McNall. 

L.E.Ost. 

U.S. Weather Bureau. 

S.W. Spragg. 

Ezada Phelps. 

W.Gerecke. 
I J.W.Gray. 

S.Diller. 

C.W.Shurtliff. 

L.W.Hahn 

Dr. J.M.Birkner. 

L.W.Howell. 

S.H.Dopp. 

L.E.Pratt. 

C.M.Miller. 
i Dr. A. D. Nesbit. 

O.6. Norton. 

W.N. Hunter. 

U.S. Weather Bureau. 

W. J. (raven. 

I. H. Weaver. 
' H.S.Toogood. 

J.W.Hann. 

(J. Treat. 

J.D.Hawkins. 

C.J.Kadish. 

F.D.Gallup. 

S.E. Davis. 

Wesley W.Lewis. 

D.F.H'ostetter. 
i U.W.Howe. 

H.B.Ware. 

U.S. Weather Bureau. 

O.P.Lowry. 



Year 1898. 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



Climatological data for the year 1898. 



Stations. 



fount ies 



Northeastern Sec. 

Agee* 

Blair 

Columbus 

Creighton 

Fremont 

Hartington 

Lynch * 

Madison* 

Norfolk 

Oakdale 

Omaha 

Santee Agency 

Stanton * 

Tekamah 

Wakefield 

West Point 

Southeastern Sec. 

Arborville* 

Ashland 

Auburn* 

Aurora* 

Beatrice 

Crete 

David City* 

Dawson 

Edgar* 

Fairbury 

Fairmont 

Geneva 

Harvard* 

Hebron 

Lincoln 

Nemaha* 

Rulo* 

Salem * 

Seward* 

Strang* 

Superior* 

Tecumseh — 

Turlington 

Weepingwater* 

Wither* 

Wymore* 

York * 

Central Sec. 

Albion 

Ansley 

Ashton * 

Brokenbow * 

Callaway 

Central City* 

Ericson* 

Genoa 

Gothenburg 

Grand Island 

Kearney* 

Lexington , 

Loup * 

North Loup 

Ord* 

Ravenna 

St. Paul* 

Southwestern Sec. 

Alma 

Arapahoe* 

Beaver City 

Benkleman * 

Blue Hill* 

Curtis 

Haigler* , 

Hastings* 

Imperial 

Madrid * 

Minden* 

Red Cloud * 

Republican* 

Wilson ville* 

Western Sec. 

Camp Clarke 

Kimball 

Lodgepole 

Nesbit 

North Platte 

Seneca * 

Thedford* 

Whitman* 

Northwestern Sec. 

Alliance* 

Fort Robinson 

Hay Springs 

Kennedy 

Kirk wood * 

Springview 

Valentine 



Holt 

Washington 

Platte 

Knox 

Dodge 

Cedar 

Boyd 

Madison 

...do 

Antelope 

Douglas 

Knox 

Stanton 

Burt 

Dixon 

Cuming 



York 

Saunders 

Nemaha 

Hamilton ... 

Gage 

Saline 

Butler 

Richardson 

Clay 

Jefferson 

Fillmore 

...do 

Clay 

Thayer 

Lancaster.., 

Nemaha 

Richardson , 

...do 

Seward 

Fillmore . . . 
Nuckolls — 

.Johnson 

Otoe , 

Cass 

Saline 

Gage 

York 



Boone — 
Custer ... 
Sherman . 
Custer — 

....do 

Merrick . . 
Wheeler . 
Platte 
Dawson . . 

Hall 

Buffalo... 
Dawson . . 
Sherman . 
Valley ... 

....do 

Buffalo... 
Howard . . 



Harlan . . 
Furnas . . 
...do.... 
Dundy .. 
Webster 
Frontier 
Dundy .. 
Adams . . 
Chase ... 
Perkins . 
Kearney 
Webster 
Harlan .. 
Furnas . . 



Chevenne . 
Kimball... 
Cheyenne . 
Logan — 
Lincoln .. , 
Thomas . . 

...do , 

Grant 



Box Butte .. 

Dawes 

Sheridan 

Cherry 

Rock 

Keya Paha . , 
Cherry 



Temperature (degrees Fahrenheit). 



1,442 
1,600 

1,203 

>,3«9 



1,585 
1, S3 2 
1,722 

1,103 



■,472 
1,060 

i,387 
1,313 



1, 100 

i,°5' 

1,792 

1 , 235 

1,368 

1,619 

945 

1,722 

1,316 

1,641 

1,633 

1,812 

1,458 

M99 

891 

842 

909 

1,435 
1,627 

1,574 
1,113 
1,214 
1,080 

1,325 
1,222 
1,642 

1,747 
2,307 
2,061 

2,477 
2,555 
1,708 
2,029 
1,584 
2,557 
1,860 
2, 146 
2,385 
2,067 
1,961 



2,028 
1,796 

',939 
2,173 
2,147 
2,968 
1,967 
2,553 
3,256 
1,932 
3.278 
3,291 
2, 169 
1,687 
1,939 
2,298 

3,700 
4,697 
3,820 



2,841 
2,97' 
2,842 
3,588 

3,968 
3,764 
3,821 



2,613 



Precipitation (inches). 



OS 



47.1 


93* 


48.7 


101 


49.1 


96 


46.7 


99+ 


48.9 


99 


46.6 


99 


46.4 


104 


48.0 


98 


47.5 


98 


47.2 


100 


50.9 


100 


49.1 


105 


48.6 


102 


49- 


102 


47-3 


100 


49-4 


99$ 


49-0 


103 


5°-7 


103 


51-4 


104 


Si -7 


104$ 




101 


50.9 


102 


48.5 


97 


52.8 


103 


49-3 


104 


5>-2 


106 


49.2 


102 


50.0 


104 


49.6 


98 


50.8 


104 


5'-o 


101 


50.1 


104 


SV7 


104 


SI. 6 


98 


49-9 


9 8| 


51. « 


97 


.51.7 


102 


53." 


105 


48.6 


104 


47.1 


99 


52.9 


97 


52.0 


101 


50.0 


104+ 


48.0 


97 


48.0 


103 


49.2 


106 


47-9 


98$ 


47.2 


100 


51-3 


104 


47-9 


100 


49-4 


100 


48-5 


106 


49.0 


102 


50.5 


102 


48.6 


98 


48.1 


102 


48.9 


99$ 


48.1 


104 


49-5 


i°5 


5<-2 


101 


50.5 


100 




100 


5>-7 


'°5 


48.9 


104 


51.0 


108 


52.2 


102 


50.5 


102 


49.8 


98 


So. 8 


105 


48.9 


i°5 


49-6 


102 


5'-5 


104 


50.7 


102 


Si- 2 


loot 




109 ! 


46.6 


102 : 


47-o 


104 1 


46.7 


IOO : 


4«-5 


101 | 


46.9 


IOO 


45-3 


98 


45- 


103 ! 




98$ ; 


45-8 


IOI | 


45- 7 


102 


46.8 


104 j 


46.7 


100 1 


47-9 


103 1 


47.0 


loot 



July 26 


—10+ 


Aug. 31 


—14 


Aug. 23 


—'5 


July 26 


—'5 


Aug. 30 


—14 


Aug. 31 


—13 


Aug. 30 


—15 


Aug. 20t 


—13 


Aug. 23 


—18 


Aug. 22 


—13 


Aug. 20 


— 10 


July 26 


— 14 


Aug. 30 


—16 


...do.... 


—14 


...do.... 


—15 


...do.... 


—17 


Aug. 30 


— 12 


Aug. 20 


— 10 


Aug. 21 


— 10 


...do.... 


— 6 


...do.... 


— 7 


Aug. 20 


— 8 


Aug. 22+ 


— 12 


Aug. 23+ 


— 8 


Aug. 21 


— 10 


Aug. 20 


— 8 


July 28 


— 10 


...do ... 


— 8 


Jnlv 26 


—11 


Aug. 2ot 


— 11 


Aug. 20 


— 8 


Aug. 21 


— 10 


Aug. 21+ 


— 3 


Aug. 23 


— 6 


Aug. 20t 


— 8 


July 27 


— 9 


Aug. 28t 


— 10 


Aug. 21 


— 10 


...do.... 


— 9 


Aug. 20t 


— '5 


July 27 


— 2 


Aug. 23 


— 8 


Aug. 20 


— 10 


Aug. 30 


— 17 


Aug. 20 


—17 


...do.... 


— 20 


July 23+ 


— 14 


Julv 26 


— 14 


Aug. 21 


— 14 


Aug. 22 


-18 


Aug. 30 


—15 


July 18 


—13 


Aug. 20t 


— 12 


Aug. 20 


— 4 


Aug. 21+ 


— 13 


Aug. 20 


— 18 


Aug. 20+ 


— 17 


.Inly 26 


— 16 


Aug. 20 


— 15 


...do.... 


— 10 


Aug. 22 


— 10 


Aug. 29 


— 11 


Aug. 28 


— 14 


July 17 


— 8 


July 24 


— 10 


Aug. 20 


— 7 


AUg. 2C.+ 


— 12 


July 24 


— 8 


Aug. 20 


-15 


June 29 


—15 


Aug. 20 


— 12 


Aug. 21 + 


— 9 


Aug. 20 


— 10 


AUg. 2q 


7 


Aug. 21 


— 22 


Aug. 20 


—16 


June 28 


— 22 


Julv 26 


— 17 


Aug. 20 


— 12 


June 28 


—■4 


July 7+ 


— 20 


Aug. 21 


— 5 


June 29 


— 17 


Aug. 28 


— 20 


Aug. 21 


—22 


June 2S 


— 18 


Aug. 30 


-.4 


June 28+ 


-'5 ! 


Aug. 21 


— 16 



Dec. 31 

. .do ... 

..do... 

..do... 

..do... 

..do... 

Dec. 31+ 

Dec. 31 

..do... 

..do... 

..do... 

..do... 

..do... 

..do... 

..do... 

..do... 



...do. 
...do. 

Dec. 

Dec. 

Dec. 

Dec. 

Dec. 

Nov. 

Dec. 

Nov. 

Dec. 
...do. 
...do. 

Nov. 

Dec. 

Dec. 

Dec. 

Nov. 

Dec. 
. .do. 

Nov. 
..do 

Dec. 
...do 

Dec. 

Nov. 

Dec. 



...do.... 
Dec. 30 
Dec. 31 

...do — 

...do.... 

...do.... 
Dec. 30 
Dec. 31 
Nov. 21 
Dec. 31 
Dec. 31+ 
Dec. 30 
Dec. 31 

...do.... 

...do.... 

...do.... 

...do.... 

...do.... 

...do.... 

...do.... 
Dec. 9 
Dec. 31 
Dec. 9 

...do 

Dec. 31 
Dec. 9 

...do 

Dec. 31 
Jan. 13 
Dec. 31 
Dec. 30 

Dec. 9 
.. .do — 
Dec. 8 
Dec. 31 
Dec. 9 

..do 

Dec. 31 
Mar. 23 

Dec. 9 
Dec. 30+ 
Dec. 9 
Dec. 31 
..do... 
..do... 



6 


21.65 


5-46 


2 


24.60 


6.70 


5 


24.36 


5-92 


10 


26.57 


6-74 


17 


29.21 


6.85 


7 


28.67 


6.63 


5 


19-54 


6.05 


4 


20.29 


6.06 


15 


19-83 


6.04 


10 


22.59 


5-75 


28 


27.84 


5.16 


10 


24.19 


6.16 


7 


20. 10 


6.08 


8 


28.18 


5-'5 


3 


22.80 


6.78 


11 


21.76 


6.24 


7 


22.74 


6.44 


14 


22.64 


5.16 


6 


33-56 


6.04 


6 


23-37 


8.45 


7 


2.5-31 


3-64 


15 


22.78 


4-25 


9 


2.5-40 


6.80 


4 


36.00 


7-59 


3 


19-55 


4-65 


22 


26.97 


5.66 


4 


29.84 


8.75 


8 


35. 24 


11.62 


8 


28.07 


6.02 


12 


25.40 


6. 11 


17 


28. 10 


4-33 


3 


40.25 


5-40 


3 


37-77 


8-93 


3 


34-36 


7-55 


7 


25-97 


5- '4 


3 


33- 08 


9-37 


IS 


22.02 


4.96 


20 


24.25 


4.48 


6 


25-87 


3-98 


20 


26.81 


3-67 


3 


30.88 


5.80 


1 


27.09 


5-29 


it 


22.20 


4.76 


3 


16.67 


4.62 


9 


17.86 


3-87 


6 


16.43 


4-45 


3 


21.62 


4.71 


6 


22. s8 


6.85 


10 


19.65 


5- 25 


8 


15.66 


3-92 


22 


22.80 


4.58 


3 


19.86 


4.02 


7 


24.76 


4-73 


10 


21.24 


4.18 


9 


18.51 


4.36 


3 


18.02 


3-91 


10 


16.50 


4-43 


3 


■5-95 


3-43 


20 


18.50 


3-25 


3 


23-77 


7.16 


2 


25-92 


6.36 


3 


23.16 


6.03 


6 


20-35 


3-73 


3 


20.72 


5-31 


3 


23.26 


5- 05 


4 


21.03 


5-34 


6 


18.29 


4.18 


8 


25-09 


6.55 


8 


24.29 


7.29 


5 


13-63 


4.08 


20 


27.20 


5-34 


7 


17.76 


4-75 


3 




5.40 


3 


21.00 


4.82 


I 


20.02 


6.46 


9 

3 

5 


18.08 


6.49 


22.32 


6.16 


24 


15-54 


4.12 


3 


19. 12 


8.25 


4 


29.70 


8.90 


7 


8.30 


2.81 


6 


13-44 


4.81 


15 


14.16 


4.07 


12 


15-99 


6.91 


9 


22.20 


8.63 


3 


20.59 


6.26 


6 




5-8.5 


1 1 


18.25 


5-98 



May 
..do. 
..do. 
..do. 
..do. 
..do. 
..do. 
June 
do. 
May 
June 
July 
June 
May 
June 
..do. 

..do. 
May 
..do. 
June 
May 
Apr. 
May 
..do. 
June 
Apr. 
June 
..do. 
..do. 
..do. 
May 
..do. 
Sept. 
..do. 
May 
June 
May 
Sept. 
Apr. 
June 
Apr. 
May 
June 

..do. 
May 
June 
May 
Aug. 
Mav 

..do, 

..do. 
June 

..do. 

..do. 

..do. 
do. 

..do. 
May 
June 

..do 



Mav 0. 04 
Sept. T4 
Junei 0.02 



Sky. 



t, 


>. 


>» 


ca 


-** 


•a 


V 


U 00 


a 


. 


OS u 







9>T3 

■O 3 


c». 


s • 

s 


E -3 


S 

9 


a 


fc 


K 



0-35 
0. 20 
o. 11 
0.21 
0.50 
0.25 
0.07 
o. 16 

0.31 
0.44 
0.31 

0.27 

0.44 

0. 12 
0.20 
0.04 

0.31 

o. 16 

0.85 
0.30 
0.74 

0.29 
0.40 

0.93 
0.30 
0.80 
T. 
0.25 
0.30 
0.71 
0.48 
0.53 
0.40 
0.80 
0.20 
0.40 
o. 55 
0.87 
0.56 
1.04 
0.47 
0.65 
0.3b 

0.20 
o. 10 
0.09 
0.00 

T. 
0.22 
0.20 
0.15 
o. 11 
0-35 
0.04 
o. 10 

T.J 
0.20 
0.22 
0.23 



Mav 

..do. 

..do. 

June 

Aug 

May 

..do 

..do 

Sept. 

..do. 

May 

Oct. 
May 



Mav 
..do. 
..do. 
..do. 
..do. 

..do. 
..do. 
..do. 
..do. 
..do. 
..do. 
..do. 



T4 
0.08 
o. 16 
0.00 
0.24 
0.22 

T. 
0.30 
0.15 
0.05 
0.00 

T. 

0.15 



Dec. 
..do. 
..do. 
Jan. 
do. 
Dec. 
..do. 
..do. 
Nov. 
Dec. 
..do. 
..do. 
..do. 
Feb. 
Dec. 
..do. 

Feb. 
Dec. 
Nov. 
Jan. 
Dec. 
Jan. 
Dec. 
Aug. 
Mar . 
July 
..do. 
Mar. 
Jan. 
Mar. 
Dec. 
Aug. 
Nov. 
Mar. 
Feb. 
..do. 
Mar. 
Feb. 
Nov. 
Dec. 
Jan. 
Oct. 
Nov . 

Mar. 
..do. 
Dec. 
Mar. 
Oct. 
Mar. 
..do. 
Dec. 
..do. 
Jan. 
Mar. 
..do. 
Dec. 
Mar. 
..do. 
..do. 
Dec. 

..do. 
Feb. 
..do. 
..do. 
Mar. 
Dec. 
Jan. 
Dec. 
Feb. 
Oct. 
Dec. 
Feb. 
Dec. 
..do. 

Feb. 
..do. 



0.13 
0.03 
o. ooj 

0.15 

T. 



Dee. 
..do, 
Feb. 
Dec. 
Sept 



0.00 


Dec. 


0.05 


Aug. 


0.25 


Oct. 


T. 


Feb. 


0.19 


Oct. 


0.12 


Feb . 


0.09 


Oct. 



25.6 

27.2 

16.7 
16.8 

37- o 
52.0 
14.2 
27.0 
30.8 
30-5 
35- o 
33-5 

29. S 
38.5 

33-3 
22.2 

20.5 



40.6 
17-5 



20.5 
36.5 



'3-2 

18.5 
29.0 
18.8 
26.5 
33-7 
21.2 
3°-4 
27-5 
20.2 

27-5 
29.0 



43-7 
52-7 

22.5 
30.5 

25.2 
'5-5 
17.5 
13.0 
17.0 
15-8 
20.3 
29-3 
3i-o 
25-8 
9-9 



io-5 
21.5 



20.3 
18.0 



15. 1 
9.8 
9-5 
7-5 

■3-o 



8.0 
16.5 
26.6 
22.5 
23.8 
19.1 



7.0 

32-5 
59-5 
23.0 
29.5 
25-3 
9.0 
25.0 
11. o 

27.0 

44-5 
27.1 
33- o 

25-7 



85 



153 
133 
116 
215 
■85 
224 



139 
170 
119 



126 
198 
199 

231 

177 
198 
137 



176 
166 
199 



225 
181 
66 
221 



166 
138 
206 



200 
138 
200 

173 
200 
124 
171 

1 88 
157 



220 
190 



92 
117 
164 
173 
68 
98 
59 



158 
97 
161 



260 
217 

187 
155 



173 
243 
'95 
224 
23-4 



214 
249 



196 
211 
163 
168 
231 



205 
177 



167 
149 



183 

201 



194 
193 
155 



280 
211 
209 



171 
93 



87 
139 

71 
125 



83 

104 

95 



77 
77 
235 
95 



122 
■39 
73 



77 
101 

47 
i°3 

75 
183 

79 

83 
■25 



43 

52 
IlS 

105 



102 
16 

IlH 
72 
80 



93 
76 

'55 
117 
82 



no 
91 



"7 
120 



118 
120 



80 
116 

150 



m5 



68 
74 
77 

47 
49 
96 

103 



106 
95 
7' 



63 

107 
64 
49 



nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

n. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

w. 

se. 

nw. 

s. 

sw. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

s. 

nw. 

nw. 

n. 

nw. 

nw. 



s. 
nw. 



ne. 
sw. 
nw. 



126 
118 

89,. 

90 j nw. 

58 ! nw. 
"5 

94 

83 



62 
96 
60 

■°5 



90 
106 
52 
69 

5' 



nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

11. 

s. 



s. 
n. 
nw. 

nw. 
nw. 
nw. 

s. 
sw. 



nw. 

nw. 

s. 

II w. 

nw. 

s. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

s. 

n. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

w. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 



nw. 
w. 

...1 1 nw. 
44 i nw. 
81 j nw. 
60 j nw. 
nw. 



* Temperature data from thermometers not self registering. 



*■ Same temperature occurred on more than one date. 



J Occurred in more than one month. 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



Year 1808. 



Monthly and annual mean temperature for the year 1898. with departures from the normal. 




Northeastern Sec 
Agee* 

Will!' 

Columbus 
< relghton 
Fremont 
Hartington 
Lynch ' ■■■■ 
Madison 

Norfolk 
Oakdale 
Omaha 

O'Neill 

Santee Agency 

Stanton ' 
Tekamah 
West Point 

Southeastern Sec 
Arborville* 
Ashland 
Auburn * 
Aurora * 
Beatrice 
Crete 

David City* 
Dawson 
Edgar* 
Fairbury 

Fairmont 28 

Geneva ■ 29 

Harvard * 29 

Hebron 

Lincoln 

Nebraska City 

Nemaha * 

Odell 

Rulo*... 

Salem* 

Seward * 

Strang 

Superior* 

Teeumseh 

Turlington 

Weepingwater* 

Wilber " 

York * 

Central Sec 
Albion 
Ansley 
Ashton* 
Brokenbow 
Callaway 
Central city*... 
Dunning 
Ericson* 
Genoa 
Gothenburg 
Grand Island 

Kearney* 

Lexington 
Loup 

North Loup 
Ravenna 
St. Paul* 

Southwestern Sec 
Arapahoe * 
Beaver City 
Benkleman' 
Blue Hill * 
Curtis. 
Franklin 
Hastings* 
Holdrege* 
Imperial 
McCook * 
Madrid * 
Mind en * 
Red Cloud * 
Republican * 
Wilsonville* 

Western Sec. 
Gering 
Kimball 
Lodge pole 

Nesbit 

North Platte 
Seneca* 
Thedford * 
Whitman * 

Northwestern Sec. 
Alliance 
Fort Robinson 
Hay Springs 
Kennedy — 
Kirkwood * 
Springview 
Valentine. . 



* After station indicates means obtained from observations taken at 7 a.m., 2 p.m., and 9 p.m.; preceding figures indicates 1 day missing from record. 
Number of days missing in record of mean temperatures indicated by character or letter, as follows: *, 1 day; t, 2; ',3; ■>, 4; ",5; •, S; ',9; J, 13; ",14. 



Year 1898. 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



Monthly maximum temperatures for the year 1898, -with dates. 



stations 



January. 



February. 



March. 



ril. 


May. 




S 






3 






s 




03 


X 


o 






CO 




CO 


a 


S 


O 



June. 



July. 


Aug 


c 




a 






3 


5 




S 


X 


Q> 


•A 


CO 


cc 


CO 


s 


n 


S 



September. 



October. 



November. 



December. 



Northeastern Sec. 

Agee* 

Blair 

Columbus 

Creighton 

Fremont 

Hartington 

Lynch* 

Madison* 

Norfolk 

Oakdale 

Omaha 

O'Neill 

Santee Agency 

Stanton* 

Tekamah 

Wakefield 

West Point 

Southeastern Sec. 

Arborville* 

Ashland 

Auburn* 

Aurora * 

Beatrice 

Crete 

David City* 

Edgar * 

Fairbury 

Fairmont 

Geneva 

Harvard* 

Hebron 

Lincoln 

Nebraska City 

Nemaha * 

Odell* 

Rulo * 

Salem* 

Seward* 

Strang * 

Superior* 

Tecumseh 

Turlington 

Weepingwater * 

Wilber* 

York* 

Central Sec 

Albion 

Ansley 

Ashton * 

Brokenbow* 

Callaway 

Central City* 

Dunning* 

Ericson* 

Genoa 

<;othenburg 

Grand Island 

Kearney* 

Lexington 

Loup * 

North Loup 

Ravenna 

St. Paul* 

Southwestern Sec. 

Alma 

Arapahoe* 

Beaver City 

Benkleman* 

Blue Hill* 

Curtis 

Franklin 

Hastings* 

Holdrege * 

Imperial 

McCook* 

Madrid * 

Minden * 

Red Cloud* 

Republican* 

Wilsonville* 

Western Sec. 

Camp Clarke 

tiering 

Kimball 

Lodgepole 

Nesbit 

North Platte 

Seneca* 

Thedford* 

Whitman * 

Northwestern Sec 

Alliance * 

Fort Robinson 

Hay Springs 

Kennedy 

Kirkwood * 

Springview 

Valentine 



28 
9 
9 

8t 
14 
9 



14 
28 

6+ 

I2t 

8t 



7 

14 
27 

8 

15+ 
14 
14 
28 
16 

8 
14 

7 

8t 
16 
16 

8 
16 
28 
i 4 t 

8 
28 
27! 

2 5 t 
14+ 
16 
14 

8 



14 

12+ 

8 

6t 

8 
14 
14 
16 

7 

8 

St 
27 1 
28 

8 



9 
9 

8t 
14 

9t 

8 
25 
26 

8 

8 

8 

8 
25 

8 
14 
14+ 



15 

8 

8 
24+ 

8 

8 

8+ 

8 

it 

8 

8 

8 

8 

8 



8+ 



S,J 


16 


89 


23t 


».; 


17 


8,S 


24 


ss 


17 


86 


26 


85 


I.St 


90 


23 


90 


16 


86 


25 


85 


16 


86 


26 


91 


15 


92 


25 


89 


16 


84 


25 


86 


17 


84 


26 


90 


16 


88 


23 


88 


16 


87 


25 


87 


15 


87 


23 


90 


IS 


90 


23 


91 


16 


89 


24 


94 


16 


88 


25 


90 


16 


86 


2.3+ 


91 


16 


87 


25 


86 


16 


88 


23'' 


90 


16 


86 


25 


90 


16 


92 


25 


86 


16 


98 


3i 


83 


16 


87 


27 


86 


16 


84 


24 


86 


16 


8.S 


25 


8s 


11 


90 


29 


87 


16 


87 


lit 


86 


17 


8s 


24 


87 


16 


88 


31 


83 


16 


84 


23 


87 


16 


86 


23 


87 


16 


8s 


24+ 


87 


16 


90 


2S 


84 


16 


89 


i8t 


84 


16 


84 


23 


90 


16 


92 


25 


86 


16 


84 


23+ 


8.^ 


16 


80 


31 


88 


16 


90 


2t 


84 


16 


90 


24 


88 


17 


92 


12+ 


82 


16 


86 


24+ 


88 


16 


90 


2S 


81 


16 


84 


24 


88 


16 


89 


24 


90 


16 


86 


23 


87 


16 


93 


23+ 


8.S 


15 


86 


23 


8S 


1 


91 


23 


8s 


15 


So 


3lt 


88 


16 


86 


23 


82 


16 


84 


24 


90 


16 


88 


25 


89 


16 


s.s 


23 


85 


15 


82 


22 


84 


6 


81 


31 


76 


16 


86 


24 


82 


16 


8.S 


23 


84 


16 


86 


23 


87 


16 


86 


23 


8,S 


16 


8S 


23 


82 


16 


86 


24 


90 


16 


86 


10 


84 


15 


88 


22 


9i 


i.S 


90 


23 


98 


i.s 


86 


18+ 


8.S 


16 


89 


23 


92 


IS 


H7 


23 


93 


IS 


98 


22 


8i 


16 


84 


23 


87 


26 


95 


•27 


89 


IS 


87 


23 


86 


15 


87 


22+ 


86 


15 


8s 


23 


88 


16 


88 


23 


«S 


15 


90 


24 


82 


I st 


88 


22+ 


84 


16 


88 


23 


93 


15 


88 


23 


91 


■31 


83 


II 


86 


26 


8s 


23 


92 


IS 


85 


22t 


84 


IS 


86 


23 


86 


15 


81 


23 


74 


16 


86 


24 


82 


16 


82 


22 


7° 


i6t 


74 


7 


80 


IS 


79 


23 


88 


27 


86 


24 


84 


14 


87 


23 


92 


15 


88 


23 


90 


IS 


90 


23 + 


86 


15 


8.S 


24 


88 


15 


89 


23 



96 

104 
97 
94 
93 
94 
97 
95 
96 
90 
98 
95 
99 

100 

93 
99 
94 
9t 
94 
98 
99 
94 
95 
92 



92 
96 
96 
96 
96 
96 
97 
98 
91 
102 
93 
90 
92 
96 
96 
94 
94 



97 
102 



99 
109 
94 
103 
102 
96 
i°5 
96 
94 
96 
97 



96 



104 
97 
103 



17 


99 


26 


23 


96 


19 


23 


95 


27 


24 


99 


26 


30 


95 


18+ 


23 


96 


23+ 


28 


95 


22 


22+ 


95 


26+ 


2.S 


95 


27t 


22 


99 


26 


22 


95 


18 


28 


95 


23 


17 


105 


26 


22 


95 


26 


-.; 


98 


18 


24 


97 


24 


22 


99 


18 


SO 


100 


26 


24 


98 


30 


23+ 


102 


■9 


12 


100 


24+ 


27 

24 + 






99 


27 


3° 


95 


18 


17+ 


100 


10 


24 


102 


27 


2,5 


102 


28 


24 


104 


28 


24 


98 


26 


24 


103 


27 


24 


97 


27 


29 


102 


■9 


17 


IOI 


19 


25 


98 


19+ 


24 


100 


19+ 


24 


96 


26 


24 


98 


27 


17 


97 


27 


24 


96 


28 


3° 


104 


20 


29+ 


IOI 


19 


22 


95 


18 


23+ 


97 


27 


22+ 


104 


24+ 


23 


93 


23 


28 


98 


26 


28 


98 


26 


28 


98 


2^+ 


28 


100 


26 


23 


102 


i8t 


19 
2J 






98 


24 


30 


99 


26 


18 


106 


18 


23 + 


98 


26 


■7' 


100 


26 


24 


97 


26 


2 2f 


98 


23 + 


28 


99 


18 


24+ 


96 


18 


24 


98 


24 


24 


98 


18 


28 


98 


24+ 


28 


IOI 


26 


3D 


104 


17 


24+ 


108 


24 


28 


IOI 


26 


24 


107 


>7l 


22+ 


98 


24 


26 


IOI 


24 


28 


IOI 


26 


28 


98 


26 


29 


104 


26 


24 


98 


18+ 


i81 


102 


24 


24+ 


IOO 


26 


28 


IOO 


24 


17+ 


IO4 


23 


22 


98 


22 


28 


IOI 


23 


28 


101 


22 


28 


IOO 


26 


28 


99 


26 


28 


96 


23 


28 


98 


7 + 


17 + 


95 


26 


29 


97 


22 


29 


99 


27 


22 


97 


23 


28 


97 


23+ 


17+ 


98 


23 


28+ 


101 


23 


28 


IOO 


23 



99 
101 
96 
96 
99 
99 
104 



100 

IOO 
IOO 

104 

102 
102 
IOO 

99 

i°3 
i°3 
104 
104 

IOI 
102 

97 
104 
106 
100 
99 
97 
104 
101 
104 
104 

99 

104 
98 
98 
96 

102 

i°5 
104 

99 

96 
104 

97 
i°3 
106 



104 
100 
too 

100 
IOO 
102 
102 
98 
102 

99 

l°5 
101 

100 
100 
105 

102 

IOO 

102 

114 

96 

99 

105 
102 
102 
102 
104 
102 

IOO 

109 
106 

102 

103 



96 

103 

9 S 

IOI 

102 

99 

100 



31 

23 
22 
3° 
31 
3° 
20+ 

23 

22 

20+ 

3° 

3° 

3° 

3° 

3° 

3° 

3° 



21\ 



5 
201 



23 

21+ 

23 
20+ 

3° 

28+ 



20+ 



3° 



3° 

20+ 



97 
93 
95 
96 
96 

100 
94 
94 
97 
96 
97 

101 
99 
97 
96 
95 



99 
99 

100 
96 
93 
98 

102 
97 
97 
95 
99 
97 



96 
98 
94 
96 
94 
92 

100 
99 
94 
92 

100 

95 
99 
98 
94 
92 
90 



29 
28 

i 9 t 

_'! I 



20t 

, 7 I 



4+ 
20+ 



'5+ 



95 
97 
95 
98 
96 
96 
94 
98 
100 
98 

91 
98 

103 

100 
95 
99 

104 
96 
95 

101 

95 
98 
99 
90 

100 
96 

102 
96 

95 
96 
98 
98 
96 
92 
95 



28 


94 


21 


95 


19 + 


99 


30 


98 


29 


94 


21 


96 



27 

3 
4 

1+ 



83 




84 


10 


80 


10 


80 


1 


83 


9 


82 


10 


8s 


2 


80 


9+ 


84 


10 


80 


9 


82 


9 


82 


1 


77 


1 


85 


9 


84 


9 


81 


9 


80 


1 


85 


9 


90 


2+ 


82 


2 


83 


9 


8.3 


9 


80 


9 


80 


2 


84 


2+ 


82 


10 


83 


9 


81 


9 


83 


1 


83 


9 


8S 


2 


90 


24 


82 


9 


88 


2 


82 


9 


86 


1 


80 


10 


86 


1 


88 


5 


86 


2+ 


84 


9 


78 


2 


79 


1 


80 


9 


83 


1 


83 


1 + 


80 


1 


82 


6 


76 


1 + 


82 


IS 


80 


i + 


82 


1 


81 


2 


86 


2 


80 


1 + 


80 


1 + 


84 


1 


83 


9 


82 


1 


82 


9 


85 


1 


88 


1 


82 


IT 


85 


I 


87 


I 


84 


I 


88 


6 


90 


1 


8s 


1+ 


81 


1 


78 


10 


68 


1 


82 


1 


97 


I 


8.3 


1 


86 


1 


90 


1 


84 


1 


Si 


1 


82 


1 


82 


1 


60 


1 


72 


1 


79 


1 


78 


14 


84 


1 


84 


I 


89 


1 


83 


1 



3 

4 
4 
3 
3 
4 
4 
3+ 

3 
3 

11 + 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

3 
3 
3 
6 

4 
3 
3 
4 
3 
8 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
20 
6+ 
4 
3+ 
4 
3 
4 
4 
3 
4 
4t 
3 

4 
3 
3 

3 

3 

1 + 

i^ 

3 

5 

3 

5 

5 

31 

3 

3 



3 

5+ 
19 

1 + 
19 

3 

it 

5 

4 

3 

I7.+ 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



28 
29 
29 
28 
28 
29 
28 
29 
29 
28 
28 
28 
28 
28 
28 
28 
28 

2S 

26 

28 

20 

28 

26 

28 

27+ 

28 

29 
26 

28 

17 
26 



2+ 
26 
28 
26 
26 
26 

2+ 
29 
27 
26+ 



26 
28 
28 
28 
28 
28 
27 
■5 
28 
27 
28 
27 
28 
28 

28 

2S 



27 
28 
2S 
28 

27 + 



28 
26 
28 
28 

2t 
28 



52 


20 


83 


20 


S7 


2S 


60 


28 


63 


28 


s.s 


28 


61 


28 



: Observed readings. 



t Same temperature occurred on more than one date. 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



Year 1898. 



Monthly minimum temperatures for the year 1898, -with dates. 



January. February. March. 



stations. 



Northeastern Sec. 

Agee * 

Blair 

Columbus 

Creighton 

Fremont 

Hartington 

Lynch* 

Madison * 

Norfolk 

Oakdale 

Omaha 

O'Neill 

Santee Agency 

Stanton * 

Tekamah 

Wakefield 

West Point 

Southeastern Skc. 

Arborville* 

Ashland 

Auburn* 

Aurora * 

Beatrice 

Crete 

David City* 

Dawson 

Edgar * 

Fairbury 

Fairmont 

Geneva 

Harvard* 

Hebron 

Lincoln 

Nebraska City 

Nemaha * 

Odell* 

Kulo* 

Salem* 

Seward* 

Strang* 

Superior* 

Tecumseh 

Turlington 

Weepingwater * 

Wilber* 

York* 

Central Sec. 

Albion 

Ansley 

Ashton * 

Brokenbow* 

Callaway 

Central City* 

Dunning* 

Ericson* 

Genoa 

Gothenburg 

Grand Island 

Kearney * 

Lexington 

Loup* 

North Loup 

Ravenna 

St. Paul* 

Southwestern Skc. 

Alma 

Arapahoe* 

Beaver City 

Benkleman* 

Blue Hill* 

Curtis 

Franklin 

Hastings * 

Holdrege * 

Imperial 

McCook * 

Madrid * 

Minden* 

Ked Cloud* 

Republican* 

Wilsonville * 

Western Skc 

Gering 

Kimball 

Lodgepole 

Nesbit 

North Platte 

Seneca* 

Thedford* 

Whitman * 

Northwestern Sec 

Alliance * 

Fort Robinson 

Hay Springs 

Kennedy 

Kirkwood * 

Springview 

Valentine 



26+ 
26 

26 

29 

26t 

29 

27+ 

St 

26 

26 

25 
29 
26 
26 
29 

26+ 

25 

26 
26t 

26 

26t 

I 

25 
23 
26 

25 
27 

25+ 

26 

26+ 

23 

24 

24 

23 

26 

26+ 

13 

26 

13 

23 

26 

23 

26t 

26 

26 

26 

26 

26 

26 

26 

26+ 

26 

26 

26 

26 

26 

26 

26 

26 

26 

26 

26 

26 
26 
26 
26 
26 
26 
26 
26 
26 
26 
26 
26 
13 
26 
26 



— 6 

— 4 

— 3 

— 6 

— 5 

— 7 

— 5 

— 4 

— 4 

— 5 

— 2 

— 6 

— 6 

— 4 



2t 






2 


— 3 


2 


2 


I 


2 


2 


4 


I 


I 


2 


2 


1 


1 


2 


8 


22 


— 1 


2 





2 


— 2 


2 





2+ 


4 


2 


2 


2 


O 


2 


2 


2 


4 


2 


— 4 


2 


— 7 


2 


2 


2 


4 


2 ! 





2 


— 5 


2 


— 3 


'9 


- 4 


2 





2 


2 


2 


— 2 


2 


12 


I 


— 8 


2 


— 3 


2 


2 


I 





2 


12 




4 
18 





2 


— 3 


2 


1 


2 





2 


2 


2 


6 


2+ 


5 


2 


9 


20 


3 
6 


2 
2 


5 


2+ 


1 


2 


12 


21 


3 
6 


2 
2 





2 


2 


2 


7 


2 


4 
6 


2 

2^ 





1 


— 8 


2 


3 


2 


2 


2 


— 2 


2 





1 


1 
— 4 


1 
3 


— 9 

— 8 


2 

2 


-»■ 


2 


— 9 

— 6 


2 

2 ! 



— I 

4 



28 
23 
22 

23 
28 

23 

22 

28 

22 

22+ 

23 



28 

22+ 
23 
23 
22 

23 

22+ 

23 

28 

28 

22+ 

23 



23 
23 

23 
22 

23 
22 
22+ 



April. 



May. 



38 
38 
34 
3' 
33 
35 
36 
35 
35 
33 
39 
32 
36 
38 
36 
33 
35 

28 

34 
36 
38 
32 
35 
35 
35 
3° 
34 
34 
33 
34 
35 
37 
3° 
41 
38 
40 
40 

39 
40 
38 
35 
34 
33 
36 
40 

3' 

.29 I 
34 
38 
3° 
40 
38 
38 
37 
29 
33 
38 
27 
34 I 

3' ! 
32 

34 I 

38 
36 
32 
34 
40 
30 
34 
37 
3° 
30 
37 
33 
32 
38 
32 



Jane. 


S 


3 




R 















d 


<\ 


O 



July. 



it 

6+ 

6 

6 

6 

6+ 

6 
12 

6 

6 

6 

6 

6+ 

6+ 

6 

6 
12+ 

6 
6 

7 

1+ 

6 

6 

5 

7 

5 

5 

6 

6 

6 

6 

6 

h 

5 
7 
5 
5 
5 

t+ 

5 

6 

4 
4+ 

6 

6 

6 

5+ 

7 

3 

3t 

6+ 

5+ 

5 

6 

5 
5 
6+ 

6+ 

7 

6 



16 


5 


32 


4 


14 


5 


30 


6+ 


>7 


1 


29 


6+ 


14 


6 


29 


6 


22 


5 


35 


1 


21 


5 


33 


6 


18 


5+ 


29 


6 



56 

58 

57 
5' 
52 
55 
46 
52 
5° 
5° 
52 
52 
53 
5' 
62 
62 
64 
60 

59 
60 
60 
49 
5° 
54 
60 
58 

48 
41 
5° 
46 
40 
52 
60 
55 
49 
44 
49 
58 
43 
52 
48 
46 
52 



5° 
49 
5° 

60 

45 
5' 
57 
60 
40 
54 
45 
48 
58 
54 
54 

35 
35 
39 
46 
46 
44 
42 
44 

47 
35 
36 
43 
52 
40 
40 



14 


56 


27 


57 


12 


42 


27 


47 


27 


5' 


■■: 


5° 


5 


54 


12 


5° 


27 


47 


27 


5° 


27 


59 


26 


48 


27 


52 


27 


5" 


27 


51 


27 


5° 


27 


50 



27 1 

27 \ 
27 

■ 4+ 
>3t 
27 
26 

27 

7t 
26 
27 
26 
27 
27 
27 
'3 

5 i 
27+ i 

7+; 

7 I 
14 l 
28+ j 

5 

V 
27+ 



27 ! 

12+! 

9 
15+ 

9+ 

5 
27 

4 
27 
15+ 

4 
27 
26 
27 
14 



4+ 


56 


5 


59 


27+ 


5° 


4 


5b 


27+ 


58 


5 


52 


27 


52 


7 


57 


17 


75 


5 


45 


IS 


52 


■3t 


55 


27 


50 


1 


60 


6 


56 


4 


5» 



35 

45 
39 
45 
5° 

47 
54 

5° 

55 
41 
46 
40 

57 
48 
42 



2+ 

3+ 

20+ 

3 
20 

3 
3 

3+ 
20 

3 
30 



26+ 

3t 



30 

31 
14 
5+ 
3i 
30 
3' 
14 
30+ 
3° 
3° 
31 
14 
13 



3t 
31 
3 



4 
31 
20 

31+ 



3't 
3 
3 



3> + 
20 

3+ 
31 



20+ 

3 

3 

3+ 
31 

3° 

it 

3 

2 

3 
3 



August. September. October. November. December 



52 

52 

46 

44 

48 

48 

56 

46 

46 

46 

55 I 

47 I 

5" I 

5' 

46 

48 

49 

5° 
44 
5° 
60 
62 
46 
49 
48 
54 
47 
45 
45 
47 
44 
48 
49 
54 
60 
59 
52 
58 
55 
5° 
47 
52 
43 
58 
54 

46 

44 
47 
5° 
51 
56 
60 

57 
5° 
46 
46 
58 
43 
5° 
45 
46 
52 

52 
52 
49 
56 
56 
5' 
34 
59 
69 

49 
60 

5° 
47 
60 

56 
5° 

45 
45 
42 

45 
5° 
48 
54 
46 

57 
46 
48 
47 
57 
46 
5° 



3 

26+ 



42 
39 

34 
36 
34 
3' 
37 
34 
34 
43 
3S 
34 
42 
35 
35 
38 

38 
38 
40 
43 
37 
39 
39 
42 
42 
37 
35 
36 
39 
37 
43 
43 
40 
42 
5° 
46 

45 
43 
40 
37 
4' 
43 
44 
46 

38 
32 
39 
32 
3° 
42 



7+ 
3° 
3° 
3° 
3° 

8 

7 

7 

9 
29 
3° 

7+ 
30 

7 

7 

7 
7 



7 

7 

7+ 
7 

6 
6 
6 
3° 



6 

3° 
24 

9 

9+ 
7 



26+ 

25 
26 
26 
26 

■i, 

3° 
26 
26 
26 



26 
26 
26 
26 
26 

3° 

26 

26 

26 

26 

26+ 

25 

26 

30+ 

25 

25+ 

25 

26 

26 

26 

26 

26 

26 

3° 

26 

3° 

26 

26 

27 

26 

26 

26 

26 

27 
25 



26 
30+ 
26 
26 

25 

26 

26 

25t 

26 

26 

26 

26 



26 
20 

'9 

26 
22 
26+ 

30+ 
30 



— 9 

— 1 

— 10 

— 9 

— 6 

— 7 

— 9 



26+ 

26 

26+ 

30 

26+ 

24 
24 
29 
26 

30 

26+ 



25 

* S 1 
27 

'9 
26 
29 

30 



23+ 

23 

23 

23 

23+ 

23 

23 
23 
23 



23 
23 
23 

-s 
23 

23* 

23+ 

22 
23 

23 
22 

23+ 

23 

23 

231 

23 



23 
23+ 



23 
23 
231 



23+ 
23+ 
23* 
23 

23+ 



23 



— 10 

—■4 

— 15 
—'5 
—14 

— '3 

— 15 

— '3 
-18 
-13 

— 10 
-17 

— '4 
-16 

— 14 

— 15 
-17 

—12 

— 10 

—10 

— 6 

— 7 

— 8 
— 12 



— 5 
— 10 



— 3 

— 4 

— 8 

— 9 

— 6 

— 9 

— 9 

— 15 

— 2 
— 10 

—17 

— '7 
— 20 

— 14 
—14 

— >4 
—20 

— 18 
—15 

— 8 

— 12 

— 4 
—■3 

— 18 
—17 

— 15 
—10 

—10 
— 11 
—14 

— 8 



— 11 

— ■5 



—'5 
— 12 



-17 
— 12 
— 14 



—17 
— 20 



— 14 

—'5 
—16 



Observed readings. 



^ Same temperature occurred on more than one date. 



Ykar 1808. 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



Monthly and annual mean precipitation for the year 1808, with departures from the normal. 



Stations. 



January. February. March 



April. 



May. 



June. 



July. August. September October. November December. Annual. 






NORTHEA9TERN SEC. 

Agee 

Blair 

Columbus 

Creighton 

Fremont 

Hartington 

Lynch 

Madison 

Norfolk 

Oakdale 

Omaha 

O'Neill 

Santee Agency 

Stanton 

Tekamah 

West Point 

Southeastern Sec 

Arborville 

Ashland 

Auburn 

Aurora 

Beatrice 

Crete 

David City 

Dawson 

Edgar 

Fairbury 

Fairmont 

Geneva 

Harvard 

Hebron 

Lincoln 

Nebraska City 

Nemaha 

Odell 

Rulo 

Salem 

Seward 

Strang 

Superior 

Tecumseh 

Turlington 

Weeping Water 

Wilber 

York 

Central Sec 

Albion 

Ansley 

Ashton 

Brokenbow 

Callaway 

Central City 

Dunning 

Ericson , 

Genoa 

Gothenburg 

Grand Island 

Kearney 

Lexington 

Loup 

North Loup 

Ravenna 

St. Paul 

Southwestern Sec 

Arapahoe 

Beaver City 

Benkleman 

Blue Hill 

Curtis 

Franklin 

Hastings 

Holdrege 

Imperial 

McCook 

Madrid 

Minden 

Red Cloud 

Republican 

Wilson ville 

Western Sec. 

Gering 

Kimball 

Lodgepole 

Nesbit 

North Platte 

Seneca 

Thedford 

Whitman 

Northwestern Sec 

Alliance 

Fort Robinson 

Hay Springs 

Kennedy 

Kirkwood 

Springview 

Valentine 



0.65 +0.12 

0.61 

0.40 

0.21 — 0.64 



0.50 
1. 10 
0.36 
0.60 
0.69 

°. 55 
0.62 

0.38 
0.66 
0-45 
o-75 
0.32 

0.55 
0-3' 
1-45 
0.30 
1.70 
0.29 
0.75 
1.29 
0.50 
1.02 
0.65 
0.86 
0.30 
1. 16 
0.83 
1.30 
'■95 
'•50 
2-75 
0.85 
0.50 
0.90 
1. 00 

I- '5 

1.82 
1.21 
0.47 
0.50 



0.57 
+0. 22 

0.02 
+0.23 
+0.40 
— o. 07 

0.06 

0.15 
—0.03 
+ 0.18 
—0.15 

0.47 

+0.02 
—0.44 
+ 0.69 

+ 1-45 
—0.50 
—0.17 
+o-37 
— o. 14 
+0.21 
— 0.27 
+0.41 
—0-34 
+0.30 
+0.06 
+"•45 



+0.42 
+0.03 
+ 1.40 
+0.29 

— o. 14 



0.60 

0.35 
0.28 
0.70 
°-45 
0.50 
1.30 
0.70 
0.58 
1.20 

0-35 
0.1 

0.30 

0.50 

°-55 — °-3< 

0.33—0.43 

0.56 ... 



+0.42 
— 0. 12 
+0. 12 

+0.23 
—0.13 
+ 1.09 
+0.13 
— 0.29 

—0.36 
—0.50 
—0.55 



0.30 



0.30 
0.60 
0.30 
0.30 
0.80 
0.50 
0.20 

0-75 
0.31 

0.45 
o. 10 
0.15 

0.90 
0.65 
0.40 

1-55 
0.77 

0-52 
1.20 
0.25 

1. 14 
1.70 
0.40 
1-52 
0.60 

0-'5 

0.44 



-o.c8 



+ 0.40 
—0.20 
— 0.22 
+ 0.30 
—0.18 

+0.3; 
—0.75 
+0.05 



+ 0.23 
+ 0.02 



+ 0.30 

+0.S0 
— 0.05 

+ 0.04 
+0.96 
+0. 50 
+ L05 

—0.32 
— 0. 16 



0.63; — o. 01 

0.65 

0.481 — 0.02 

1. 50! +0.97 

0.671 — 0.29 

0.S3 +0. II 

' +0.36 
+0.13 
—0.05 

+0.20 
— 0.09 
— o. 10 

+0.39 

— o. 14 

0.85 



0.60 
0.70 
0.70 

0.78 

0.67 
0.42 

0.99 
0.45 

0.12 



0.70 +0.04 



0.31 
0.83 

2. II 
O.70 
1.92 

1-23 

o. so 

2. '16 
O.36 
I.09 
O.60 
O.87 
I. OO 
O.7I 

0.99 
0.71 

3-30 
2.32 
1-50 
2.25 
0.20 
0.40 
0.80 
0.87 
1-23 
1.07 
1.04 
0.70 



—0.47 
+ 0. 19 
+ 1.00 
—0.03 
+ 0.97 
+0.50 
—0.23 

—0.30 
+ o.35 



-o.39 
+ 0.17 
+0. 12 
+0.04 
—0.28 



—0.65 

+0.14 
— 0.41 
+0.41 
+0.20 

—0.08 



— 0.02 

—0.3: 
—0.52 
—0.32 
— 0.29 
+0.17 

+0.04 
— o. 

—0.67 

— o. 

— 0.20 



0.67 +0.21 

0.45—0.32 

0.40 
0.10 

0.15 
0.30 
0.25 

0.40 

0.94 

0.40 

0.73 

0.25 
0.3b 
0.08 
0.40 

0.68 
0.56 

T. 
0.02 

T. 
0.27 
0.20 
0.30 

o.33 
0.25 
0.22 
T. 
0.20 
0.44 
°->5 
0.25 
°. '5 



°-'5 
o. 10 

0.15 
0. 19 
0.00 
0.60 
0-15 



T. 

o. 20 



o. 55 
T. 



—0.53 



-0.49 
-o. 17 
-0.81 
-0.60 
-0.46 

-0.48 
-0.67 
-0.34 



-0.51 



+0.03 
—0.23 



+0.04 
— 0.20 



— 0.40 
—0.29 
—0.17 

—0-75 
0.74 
o. 12 — 0.32 
0.28 —0.48 



0.41 
1.29 
0.82 
1. 13 
i-75 
1-23 
0.52 
0.86 
0.72 
0.69 
1. 15 
0.75 
0.60 
0.75 

2. 10 

I.07 

O.63 

'■Si 

1-77 
0.74 
1.88 
0.40 

o.75 
2.02 
0.30 

1.3° 
0.30 
0.25 
0.40 
0.8R 
1.40 
1.15 
1. 61 
2. u 
2. 10 
0.80 
0.60 
0.60 
0-55 
'•55 
1-32 
1.36 
1. 10 
°-75 

0.20 
o. 10 
o. 19 
0.00 
0.60 
0.22 
0.26 
0.20 

0.82 
0.50 

0.7 

0.04 

0. 10 

0.03 

0.20 
O.23 
0.54 

T 

o. 16 
0.40 
o.c8 

O. 2S 
0.0.5 
O.25 
O.O3 
O.56 
0.20 
0.30 
0.32 
0. 25 

0.08 
T. 

0.30 
o.75 
o. 10 
0.30 
0.64 
o. 10 

0.35 

0.20 

0.30 
1-30 

0.88 
0.64 
0.72 
0.32 
o.57 



-0.96 

-o-35 

— 0.07 

0.09 

—o.43 

—0-75 

0.26 

—0.33' 

o-45 

—0.37 

-0.81 

-0.48 

—0.30 

+0.59 

—0.49 

—0.99 
+0. 11 
—0.76 
0.80 
+0.31 
-1.56 
-1. 12 

-0.91 

-0.15 



0.97 
—0.82 
—0.82 
+0.01 
— 0.42 



-1. 01 

— 0.27 
—0.31 
— o. 11 
— 0.04 

— 0.72 



-'•45 
-o-57 

-0.64 
-1. 19 
-0.52 
-1.20 
-o. 58 



-1.23 

-0.82 
-1. 19 



-1-34 
-0.94 
-1.28 
-1. 12 
-0.62 

-o.yi 

-1.22 

-0.32 



-0.58 
-O127 



-0.97 

-'•13 
+ 0.06 
—0.82 
-i-'3 

— 0.90 
—0.96 



1.99 
2.48 
2.45 
1.82 
2.50 
1.49 
1. 61 
1.79 
1.49 
1.88 
2.74 

1-39 
1. 10 
'•43 
1.86 

■■79 



-1.85 

— "•75 
—2-59 
—0-35 
—3-05 
—2.82 
-3-°4 
-1-32 
-'•53 
-0.51 

-3-32 
-2-31 
-2.68 
-1-95 
-1.02 



2.88 
3-46 
2.92 
1.67 

3-53 



—0.79 

+0.79 
—0.44 

—3. '9 

+ 1.07 
4.25+I.51 

2.7s!— 0.98 



3-19 
2.00 
5-66 
4.07 
3-9' 
4.38 
3-9" 
3.88 
2.31 
3- 35 
4.68 
3- 20 
3.10 
4.70 
4-33 
2.70 
3- '8 
3-98 
3.61 
5-8o 
4-73 



+ 0. 11 
-2-34 
+ 2.94 
—0.36 
+0.64 
+ 0.69 
+ 2.43 
+ 1.27 
—0.31 



+ 1-57 

— o. 40 
+0.13 
+ 1.60 
+ 1.01 

+ 1.00 



1-37 —3- '2 
2.69 — 0.42 
2.42I— 0.52 
2-54 
2-35|— °-79 

2.20; — 1.24 
O.83! — 2.5I 
■•38—1.97 



2.78 
I.09 
2.8l 
3.60 
2.23 
2.48 
I. OO 
2.23 
2.27 

4.51 
2.27 

3-47 
4-9' 

2-32 

4.46 



—O.3O 

— 1-47 
+0.80 
— 0.41 

—2.50 

—0.66 



-0.43 



— 1.30 
+0.06 
+ 1.01 



— >-3' 
+ 2.21 

4.26J+0. 13 
3-3^'— °-2i 
1.82 — 0.54 
2-55 
0.64 
4.02 

3-20 

4.68 
2.35 

1.80 +0. 16 

I.32J-0.32 

o. 101 

'•73 
1.42—0.75 

0.50 

1.90 

0.74—1.65 

0.53—1-72 

0.50— 1. 15 
1. 11!— 1.03 
1.38!— 1.67 

'•52| 

0.70J— 2.81 
'•33— '-43 



46 +2.96 

70 

+3-64 
+ 3-6.5 
+ 2.74 
+ 3-05 
+4-3' 
+o.39 
0.04 

+ 2.53 



+3-25 
+ 1-54 
+0.32 
+0-79 
+ 0.46 

+0.23 
+ 2. 
—0.66 
— o. 01 
—0.34 
+0.47 
+ 3-49 

—0.98 
+0.61 
+ 1-95 
+0.78 
— 1.02 
+ 0.38 
—0.17 
— 2.07 



+0.51 

+ 1.17 
—0-33 
—0.23 
— 1.05 

+ o.75 

+0.18 

+ 1.15 
0.00 

+ 3- 06 
+ 1.85 
+ 0.80 
+ 1.4 
+ °-59 

— 0.72 
—0.52 
— 0.21 

+ 1 . 04 
— o-35 



+ 1.32 



2.51 —0.97 

3.58 

5.09 +1.03 
5. II +1. 21 
6.72I + 1.50 
6.03,4-2.06 
1. 91 — 1.80 
6.06+2.03 
6.04+1.72 
4.82i+o.6i 
5.16! — 0.20 
2.82!— 1.84 
2.41 — 1. 41 
6.08I+2.75 
4.72 — 1.62 
6.24 +2.23 

6.44 +2.29 
2. 21 [ — 2.36 

4.94+1.00 
8.45+3-37 
1.64—2.68 



3-92 
5-3° 
4-99 
4-°5 
3- °7 
8-75 
11.62 



— 0.40 
+0.71 

+0.03 

— 1-5' 
+ 5.06 
+6.65 

6.02i+2.02 



+ I.67 

— o. 24 

—2.30 



+ 1.16 

—0-35 
-2.58 
— 1.09 
— ■•■3 

+0.03 

+ 0.60 
— 0.40 
+ 0.51 



+3-72 
+1.13 

751+0- 12 
96J+0.S2 
29 +4.99 
9s 

+ 2.66 
+0.01 
+0.70 



63 

26 

8s 
5-9« 



+ 2.95 
+4- 15 



+ 4-05 
+ 1.42 

+7.28 
+0.84 

+2.47 
+ 1-57 
+ 3-83 
+6-33 

+ 3-66 
+ 2.80 



6. 11 
3-99 
2.77 
5.18 
4-03 
5-14 
5-55 
4-97 
9-37 
3-79 
2.49 
2-79 
3-67 
5-27 
4.76 

4.62 

3-49 

4-45 

2-49 

2.981 — 1.64 

5.'5+'-°3 

1.07'— 3.30 

2.48] — 1. 19 

3-9' 

4.02 

4.73+0.20 

4. 18J + 0.64 

4.361 + 1.02 

3-9'j 

4.43— °- 28 
3-25,-0-57 
7-16 



3.23, 
3-73' 
3-26; 
3-75 1 
3-27| 
3-59, 
3.00 

3-8 5 ! 
3-55i 
3-7o 
1.78 
4-44 
1.30 
4.00 
4.05 



1.381-1.48 
2.611+0.49 

T. 

4.231 + 1.61 



2-54 
0.20 
6. 10 
1.70 



1. 10 
2.09 

0.43 



—0.75 



+ 3-io 
—1-45 



—2.19 

—0. 84 
—2-77 
1. 911— 2.44 

3-3° 

2.90 — 0.60 

2. II —1.36 



3-05 
■-38 
O.82 
2.96 
2.56 
3-84 
4.85 
O.90 
I.60 

2-15 

4.20 

3-87 
6.16 

1-32 
1-99 
0.80 

0.46 
1. 1 
3-70 
0.69 
2.38 
1.8 
0.70 
2.30 
0.79 
0.80 
T. 
0.35 
0./7 
0.71 
3-93 
2.65 
4-56 
1.08 

3-22 

2.13 
O.92 
0.80 

'•'5 
1-45 
3-09 
2.92 

'•55 
0.28 



2.03 
2.60 
0.40 



+0.89 

i'38 
— 1.07 

— 1.74 
+ 1.16 
+ 1.69 
—'•'5 
—2-45 

1.27 
— 0.42 
+ 1.85 
+3-5° 
— 2.29 
1.62 
3- '9 

1.91 

—3-5' 
1. 16 
3-58 
1.89 
2.07 

—3- '5 
1.28 

— 1.28 
4.15 
'•99 

—2-47 
1-75 
—3-44 
+ 0-59 
—0.87 



— 2.42 

-3-78 
-2.85 
— 0.04 
— 1.05 

-3-oi 

—0.47 
—1.42 
—0.87 

+ 1 . 25 

—2.81 



2.72 
2. 22 
3-86 
3-4o 
2.06 

3-°4 
2.03 
1. 61 
2.01 
2.92 
1.98 
2-33 
2-47 
1-3' 
4.60 
3-88 

1.99 
2-95 
'•55 
1.84 
2-33 
2.76 
2.80 

o.93 
2.91 
1.46 
4.20 
4-97 
5-" 
1.76 
3-45 
0.84 

°-53 
1 -5° 

0.40 

1-37 
3-42 
5-2.5 
0.87 
1-55 
1-77 
1.91 
4.01 
'•39 



+ 1.28 1 

2 

+ O.94 2 
+ I.47I 

—'•33 
+0.13 
+0.74 

—2.15 

— 1.88 
+0.47 

— 1.26 
+ 0.16 
+ 0.65 
—1. 16 
+ 1.38 
+ 0.45 



— 1.04 
— 1. 12 
—3-57 
—0.71 

— 1.64 

—0.49 
— 0. 01 



— 1.80 
—1-74 
+ 1.36 
+ 1.60 
+ 2.23 

— 1. 61 
+ °-35 
— 2.46 



+ 0.69 

—2.19 

— 2.15 
—0.94 

— 1.70 

— 0.64 



— 1.07 
— 2.40 



1. 91 
1.36 
1.48 
'•39 
1.76 
1.29 

'•93 
0.99 — 2.58 
2.19— 1.94 
1.3S 

1.85 

I.6O 

2.85 

0.87 

2.56 

1. 14 

0-55 

1.85!— 0.87 

3-37I + I.I5 

1.68 

0.63 —0.56 



— 1-34 
—2.68 
—0.79 



-2.38 



+ 0.521 

— 2. 2S| 



-3-5' 
-2.04 



1.50 
1.63 
1.80 
1.92 

'.65 

2.26 

1.60 

2.25 +0.37 

1.29 —1. 31 

5.00 

+ 2-55 
— o-53 



—0.30 
— 0.26 



5-50 
2.00 



4.76 
2. 19 

2.71 

3-70 

4-3' 
2.14 
2.28 



+ 2.40 
+ 0.22 
+ 0.43 
+ 1.20 

+ 0.18 
— 0.76 



1.47—0.57 

2. 12 — 0.02 

1. 76I — O.OI 

3-55 

6.851+4.50 
2.30+0.36 
0.03 — 2.24 
2.68!+o.66 
3.98J + 1.18 
2.52 ... 
3.471+0.89 
2.53I+0. 16 
2.51I + 0.28 
2.74 ... 
1.97—0.36 
1.72)— 1. 14 
3- 80 

3-'7' 

2.23] — 0.01 

0.90: 

2.14 

1.67 —0.8S 
0.30I— 3-oo 
6.55+3-27 
1.83 1 — 0.4b 
0.88,-2.03 
0.96!... 
1 . 50 — o. 28 
4. 23' +0.67 
0.28 — 2.36 
1.39 ... 
2.61 ... 

o. 6o| — 0.79 
0.45 —0.96 



3-26 
1.40 
2-55 
3-30 
0.05 

0.20 
0.05 
0.31 

2-3' 

1.87 
1. 91 

3.62 



+ 1.24 

— 1.02 



—2.62 
— 1.40 

—1.44 

— 1.60 

+0.65 
—0.17 

+ '■54 



— o. 16 

+0.34 
— 0.64 
— 0.04 
—o.44 
—1.26 
— 0.25! 
-1.68 
— o. 20 
+0. 04J 
291—0.56 
82—0.88 



+0.47 
2.93 ■■• 

I. 52 — 0.06 
I.97I+O.81 

2.05' — o. 20 

2.3OI+O.91 

°-79— o-5 8 
1. 241— 0.44 
0.86 1 — 0.49 
1. 151— 0.08 
2.54+0.07 



0.53—0.21 
0.48 



65 

°5 
02 

95 

75 
39 

75 

-l" 
25 

28 
60 
25 
7^ 
56 
7° 
ic 
T. 

T. 

0.76 
'•31 
0-7' 

0.49 
0.52 
0.64 



+0.27 

+ I.OOJ 

—0.64 

+ 1-39 

+ 0.43 
+ 2.38 
+0. 50 
+ 1.63 
+0.52 
+0.37 
+5-64 
+°-35 
+ 1.62 

+ 0.74 
+ 1.30 
+ 2.77 
+ 0.19 
+ 0.41 
+0.34 



+0.39 

+ 1 ■ 59 
+ 2.27 
+ 1.7' 
—0.03 

+ 0.34 

+0.27 
+ 0.30 
+ 0.87 

+ 0.52 
— 0.02 



3.83I + 2.56 
1.62 +0.20 
2.60 +0.92 
-0.67 



1.86 
'•53 
2.14 
'•53 
1. 16 
1.44 
1.65 
2. 29 



—0.44 
— 0.61 
— 0.52 
— 0.24 
— 1-3' 
—0.63 
—0.38 
'•3' 



—0.71 

—o.75 
+ 1.51 
+ 2.28 
+ 0.96 
+ '•49 



+3- 



0.90! — 2.56 
1.89 — 0.47 
2.15— 1.46 

2. 14! — O.27 
I.62I— O.85 

1. I2|+0.82 

'•551—0.33 
0.97—1.99 

2. 12 , 

1 . 20 
2.2o| 
2.4O 
2.O9 

1.49 
O.80 
I.48 
I.04 
2.72 
I. 71 
1.20 



0-5' 

1.08 
0.57 

3- 90 

T. 

0.70 



o.35 
'•'3 
1.03 
'■32 
0.65 

°-73 
0.42 

0-53 
0.56 

o.45 



0.00 

-'•33 

— 1. 14 
—1.26 
+ 0.24 

—0.46 

—2.23 

—0.52 

— '•23 

—1.50 

— 1. 09 



-'■3' 
-0.49 
-0.93 
-0.83 
-1.25 
-0-57 



0.50I 

0.32J— 1. 01 
I- 13 

1.67 

+ 2.64J 0.33— 1. 71 
+ 2.35! 2.10 
+ 1.68J 1.82 
+ 2.92! 0.73 
+3-441 0.30 

0-44 



+ 2-3' 
+ '•95 
+ 2-37 



—0-37 
+ o.os 
+ 1.62 
+0.85 
+ 1.28 

—0.28 

—0-37 

—0.43 
+0.13 
+ 0.66 
—0.15 

—0.55 
—0.44 



T 

1.04 
0.84 



o.35 



°-57 
0.6s 



+0.45 
—0.68 
— 0.91 
—0.79 



—0.87 
— 1. 01 

—0.80 



+0.01 
+ 0. 10 



1-53 
0.07; — 0.91 
0.00 
0.20 
o. 10 



T. 

0-33 
0.25 
0.30 
o. 19 



0.09 



—0.69 

—0.32 
— 1.02 
—0.81 
—1.03 



0.48 
0.27 
0.90 
0.83 
0.08 
0.60 
0.31 
o.53 
1.20 
0.20 
0.32 
0.71 
1.07 
o.74 

0.40 
0.44 
0.85 



— 0.21 
— 0.60 
+0.07 
— 0.29 
— 0.64 
—o.37 
—0.32 
—0.15 
+0.14 
— 0.24 
—0.48 
— 0.09 
— 0.07 
-0-37 

— 0.42 
—0.30 
+0.15 



0.38—0.50 

0.98 

0.50 

0.80 

'■05 

0.43 

0.92 

0.55 
0.82 
0.67 
1. 00 
0-95 
0.5' 
1.02 
0.42 
0.40 
1. 00 
0.50 
0.7c 
0.80 
0.90 
0.56 
1-23 

0.74 
0.30 

0.61 
0.45 
0.49 

0.22 

0.65 
0.31 



0-53 
o. 55 
0.90 
0.75 
o. 45 
0.81 
0.40 
0.70 
0.69 
0.52 

0.60 
o. sS 
T. 
0.2; 
0.63 



+0.46 
o. 19 
— 0.02 
+0.51 
—0.63 
+0.36 
—0.09 
—0.01 

+0.05 

— o. 13I 

+ 0.21 
—0-33 

—O.23 

— O.O5 
+ 0.44 
—0-37 
— O. II 

0.00 

—0.17 
—0.08 
+0.13 

+ 0. 10 

—0.45 

—0.23 

+0.05 
— 0.05 

+0.39 
—0.44 



+0.17 

— o. 20 
+0.20 

—0.15 

— 0.16 

+0.23 

+ 0.22 
+ 0. IO 
—O.38 



+ 0.09 
-0.34 
—O.63 
+ 0.04 



0.35 
0.20 
O. II 

0.35 

0.70 
0.25 

0.0; 

o. 16 
0.42 

0.44 

0.31 
0.05 

0.27 

0.44 

0.60 

0/04 

0-33 
o. 16 



0.32 
0.74 
0.60 
0.40 
1.27 
0.58 
0.90 
0.60 

0-75 

0.38 
0.9* 
0.48 



-0.15 21. 

24 

-0.66124 
-o.39| 26 
-0.39 29 
-1.03 



—0.30 
—0.54 
— 0.22 
—0.28 
— 0.70 
—0.64 
— o. 16 
— 0.50 
— o. 23 
— 1. 00 

—0.23 

— O. S2 

+ O.78 
— O.17 
—O.44 
+ 0.01 

— 0.42 

+0.28 
+0.04 
+0.22 
+0.09 
+0.01 

—0.48 
+0.29 
—0.32 



1. 15 

0.70 
1.04 

'•79 
0.72 
0.92 
0.60 
1. is 
1.06 
1.04 
0.87 
0.80 

0.20 
0.20 
0.09 

T. 

T. 
0.25 



— 0.29 
-°-37 
+ 0.57 
+ 0.31 
+0.42 
— o. 09 
+ 0.37 
+ 0.06 
—o.37 

+0.61 

+ 1.10 



o.39 
o. 10 

0.86 

0.70 

0.80 
0.87 

o-93 
0.85 
o.35 

1. 10 

1.60 
0.70 
0.64 +0.22 
0.51J+0. 16 
o. 15— 0.08 
0.40 — 0.32 
0.20 — 0.26 

0.60 +0. 10 
0.46 — 0.07 
0.48—0.32 
0.70 — 0.01 

0.35! 

0.30J— 0.38 

O.54I— O. 12 



0. 20 

0.15 



0.35 

T 

0.30 

o-37 
o. 12 



+0-35 
+0.06 
+0. 05 
+ o-75 
— 0.02 
+0.41 
— 0.01 

+ °-35 
+0.13 
+0.25 
+0.34 
+0.22 

—0.41 
— 0.22 
—0.32 

—0.36 
—0.50 



-0.24 
-0.74 

-0-33 
-o. s8 
-0.58 
-0.41 

-0.18 
-0.3' 



0.08 
0.06 —0.48 
T. -1 
0-39 —0.09 
o. 16 — 0.24 



o. 24 — 0.47 

T. !— 0.65 

0.921+0.38 



27- 

24. 

20. 

28. 
21.76 — 



+ 1.49 



+ 2. II 

— O.69 
+ 2.4O 

— I.07 

— 5-42 

— 6.66 

— 0.22 

— 3-57 



+ 2.S 



40. 25 
27.78 
37-77 
34 -3 6 
25-97 
33- 08 
22.02 
21.25 
25.87 
26.81 
30.88 
22.20 

16.67 
17.86 
16.43 
21.62 
22.58 
'9-65 



15.66 
22.80 
19.86 
24.76 
21.24 
18.51 
18.02 
16.50 
18.50 
23 

23.16 
20. 35 
20.7 
23.26 
21.03 



3-44 
1.81 
4.67 

2.36 

— 4.86 



2.41 
- 1.83 
1. 91 



+ 7-28 
+ 2.67 
+ 0.20 
+ 1.88 



— 0.36 



— 5-oi 

— 7.16 
+ '-5° 

— 2.88 



— 3-'o 

-6.13 

— 3-39 

— 2.09 

+ '+65 

— 4.10 



— S-55 

— 4-29 



— 3-70 

— 4-15 

— 1.82 

— 6.45 



— 1-74 

— 0.35 



25.09— 2.94 
22.80 — 1. 11 
24.29 + 6.20 



0-34 



0.15- 

o. 20'- 

0.30J— 0.46 
0.73, +0.17 
0.05 — 0.29 
0.00 — 0.49 



.27 18. 48 



0.55 +0.03 

o. 50 

o. 13,— o-35 
0.03—0.51 
0.15—0.25 
o. 15^—0.87 
o. 10^ — 0.44 



0.00 

0.51 

0.62 
0.40 
0.24 
I. 00 

0.37 



'3-63 — i-o5 



27.20 
17.76 



18. cS 



22.32 
'5-54 
19. 12 
29.70 
8.30 



0.30 13.44 



—0.15 
— 0.07 
-0.15 

+0.66 
—0.08 



14. 16 

'5-99 
22.20 

20.59 



18.25 



5-8i 
5.60 



— 3.62 



— 2.43 

-8-39 

— 2.88 

— 2.02 

— 2.17 
+ 1.90 



CO 

O 

i— i 
H 
< 

CO 
CO 



CO 

<! 
O 

W 
« 

o 

o 

»— i 

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S> 

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CO 

M 
O 

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i— i 

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CO 

H 
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0£ 



s e o 







o 

00 



55 
C 



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A- ) — 



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CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



Year 1898. 



DISPLAYMEN. 

[Figures following stations indicate number of forecasts mailed from distributing centers.] 



Stations. 


Displaymen. 


Stations. 


Displaymen. 


stations. 


Displaymen. 


Stations. 


Displaymen. 


Anslrv 


Chas. R. Hare. 

Dr.A.S.v Mansfelde. 
('.. T.Wilson. 
(J. W. Harmon. 
.V. N.Thomas. 

C.S.Stockwell. 

G. P.Marvin. 
.I.L.Baker. 
E. A. Moore. 
.1.. T.Douglass. 
Nellie Strain. 
Carl Kramer. 
C.A.Sheldon. 
Dr. Geo. Roberts. 
W.. T.Belknap. 
W.Z.Taylor. 
S.R. Razee. 
E.B.Taylor. 


Dawson 

Dwight * 

Ewing(i3) 

Falls City (4) 


M.L.Libbee. 
J.P.Duiilap. 
.T.A.Wood. 
J.C.Yutzy. 

W.F.Oramb. 
M.L.Jones. 
Thomas Carroll. 
F.M.Florv. 

E.Corbin. 

J. T. Fleming. 

E.D.Einsel. 

W.H.Illian. 

Daniels Bros. 

L. B. Partridge. 

U.S. Weather Bureau. 

C.F.Mettey. 

E.S.Hayhurst. 




C.H.Meeken. 

James Stuart. 

M.M.rhappell. 

R.G.Strothcr. 

D.S.Dusenbery. 

J. H. Davenport. 

W.N.Huse. 

J.E.Goodrich. 

U.S. Weather Bureau.; 

Do. 
(has. N.Cole. 
.Tas.Milford. 
Joe Karrer. 
Rogers <& Cohvell. 
S.D.Phillips. 
.I.D.Forbes. 
.I.R.Crow. 
Postmaster. 




F M Hunt 








O.N.Kramer. 
R S Oberfelder 


Atkinson 










Sioux City, la. (15) 


I'.s. Weather Bureau. 
Postmaster. 




Nelson 

Newport 

Norfolk 

North Loup 

North Platte (4) .. 

Omaha (54) 

O'Neill 

Ord 


Bassett 


Fairfield 




Stromsburg 


J.G.Green. 
James Harvey. 
J.D.Stine. 
Dr J W Birkner 


Beemer 


Harvard (id) 


Brokenbow 


Superior 




Tilden .. 






Wakefield 


I!. S. Weather Bureau. 

R.Bachman. 

W H McNeal 


Kearney 




Ponea * 

Prosser 

Red Cloud (15).... 




Wauneta 

Wisner 

Wood River 

Yankton, S.D. (4) . 


J.W.Hann. 

G.W.Howe. 

.T.P.Riddile. 

I'.S. Weather Bureau. 


Culherfson 

Curtis uO 

David City (3) 


Lincoln (205) 

Lodgepole 

Loup City 



* Cold wave and frost warnings only. 
CLIMATE AND CROP CORRESPONDENTS. 

[Most voluntary observers and displaymen are also climate and crop correspondents, and are not included in this table.] 



Stations. 



Adelia 

Admah 

Ainsworth 

Alexandria 

Do 

Alford 

Allen 

Almeria 

Ames 

Arapahoe 

Archer 

Arlington 

Aspinwall 

Atlanta 

Aurora 

Do 

Axtell 

Ayr 

Bt.llagh 

Bancroft 

Banksville 

Bartlett 

Bartley 

Belden 

Belgrade 

Berea 

Berlin 

Bertha 

Bertrand 

Bigsprings 

Bingham 

Bladen 

Do 

Blair 

Bloomfield 

Bluehill 

Bluesprings 

Boxbutte 

Bradshaw 

Brayton 

Brock 

Brokenbow 

Bruno 

Brunswick 

Cairo 

Calvert 

Cambridge 

Camden 

Campbell 

Carleton 

Carpenter 

Cedarbluffs 

Cedar Rapids 

Chalco 

Chester 

Clark 

Clearwater 

Do 

Cody 

Cozad 

Colbergen 

Cook 

Cooleyton 

Cornell 

Crab Orchard 

Craig 

Crete 

Daily 

Dakota 

Dannebrog 

Dorp 

Day 

Decatur 

Do 

Dennison 



Correspondents. 



M.D.Jordan. 

T.B.Pauling. 

T.W.DeLong. 

Arthur W.Pat ch. 

G.W.Buchanan. 

John A.Erskine. 

R. Burgess. 

B.D.Williams. 

H.Schillev. 

A.H.Wood. 

CD. Chapman. 

M.C.Grover. 

J.F.Ebouther. 

M.D.Case. 

F.C.Putnam. 

A.M. Glover. 

T.G.Wever. 

H.M.Fleming. 

S. A.Ballagh. 

H.O.Hilbers. 

W.H. Benjamin. 

W.H. Updike. 

R.S.Baker. 

Edward T.Crellin 

R.L.Osborn. 

F.A.Stratton. 

J.H.McEachron. 

A.B.Jacobs. 

Arthur Shedd. 

.I.H.Abbot. 

W.C.Wood. 

C.H.Rust. 

P.W.Warner. 

W.W.Stockton. 

Will A.Needham. 

Wm. Krueger. 

S.A.Smith. 

M.D.Atkin. 

Austin Linslev. 

N.M.Thorpe. 

B.H.Bailey. 

F. H. Weisenreder 

M.W.Mahonev. 

S. A. Bear. 

C. A. Alford. 

M. W.Nesmith. 

A.Easton. 

Elisha Kinney. 

J.G.Orndorf. 

.T.H.Bryant. 

II. A. Carpenter. 

W. A. Bates. 

Dennis Tracy. 

S.M.Bianche. 

Stephen Forsdick 

R.A.Patterson. 

J. M. Snider. 

Fred.H.Nolze. 

Geo. L.Coleman. 

W.W.Smith. 

Isaac C.Barnes. 

J.W.Smith. 

O.E.Cooley. 

Isaac Underhill. 

F.M.Sharrett. 

John W. Freeman. 

Peter Meyer. 

Lizzie Martin. 

Merrit Schmid. 

J.B.Dolph. 

.las. Hudson. 

A. D. Remington. 

Thos. R.Ashley. 

F.J. Griffin. 

Thos. Stevenson. 



Stations. 



Jr. 



Deweese 

De Witt 

Diller 

' Dixon 

Doniphan 

Dorchester 

Doss 

Dover 

Duff 

Dunbar 

Dunlap 

Eagle 

! Edgar 

Do 

Edholm 

Elgin 

Elk City 

I Elk Creek 

lilkhorn 

Elwood 

Emerick 

Emerson 

Essex 

Everett 

Farnam 

Farwell 

Filley 

Firth 

Fort Calhoun . . . 

Franklin 

Fulton 

Galena 

Geneva 

Gilchrist 

Gilmore 

Giltner 

Grant 

Greeley 

Guiderock 

Haigler 

Hampton 

Hardy 

Harrisburg 

Hartman 

Harvard 

Hastings 

Haydon 

Hayes Center. .. 

j Hay Springs 

' Hazard 

: Henderson 

i Hickman 

Highland 

Hildreth 

Holdrege 

Hoskins 

Hubbard 

Hubbell 

Humboldt 

Inavale 

Indianola 

Ithica 

Johnstown 

Kearney 

Keene 

Kenesaw 

Kimball 

Laretto 

Lawn 

Leigh 

Logan 

Lomax 

Longpine 

Loomis 

Lorton 



Correspondents. 



Dr. V. Anderson. 

F.R.Wild. 

C. W.Tonnemaker. 

F. G. Ebenezer. 

F.W.C'amp. 

Wm. Abbott. 

Geo. E.Bacon. 

E. C. Baltensperger. 

B.Mills. 

C.H.Wilson. 

B.C.Fenner. 

G.W.Venner. 

Wm. Darby. 

J.W.Conner. 

Frank F. Loomis. 

Anton Zerbes. 

Geo.G.Sharpe. 

L.S.Waggoner. 

J.A.Sullivan. 

A.M.White. 

Chas.Letheby. 

Fred.Blume. 

.las. L. Balcom. 

R.B.Millar. 

J. B. Kitchen. 

Michael Larkowski. 

Elijah Filley. 

E.J.Brithouwer. 

H.F.Green. 

H.V.Cyr. 

.I.S.Craig. 

G.McGoodin. 

Waldo E.Propst. 

Fred. M.Knott, 

F.A.Baldwin. 

L.C.Genoways. 

Isaiah Babcock. 

W. E. Morgan. 

C.E. Vaughn. 

M.N. Palmer. 

E.N.Ingalls. 

G.A.Bixby. 

Mrs. V. M. Crossler. 

Frederick Leppert. 

Dr. F.A.Butler. 

Chas. W.Winkler. 

A.J.Deets. 

E.L.Gandv. 

C.W.Phillips. 

John Borcking. 

C. A.Flippin. 

O.B.Devitt. 

Sam Smoke. 

K.J.McNally. 

H.O.Barber. 

Ludwig Ziemer. 

Jonathan Frederick. 

Joseph Lamb. 

J.H.Smith. 

O.R. Pitney. 

E.S.Hill. 

W.E.Dech. 

A.Scattergood. 

H.S.Bell. 

John Swanson. 

Joe Weller. 

Peter Larson. 

.las. B.Barnes. 

J.M.Wanck. 

John B.Stevens. 

Jesiah Smee. 

G.H.BIakeslee. 

Jas. A. Nay. 

W. A.Forsythe. 

T.R.Whittaker. 



Stations. 



McCook 

McCool Junction. 

Madrid 

Magnet 

Maplecreek 

Martinsburg 

Mason City 

Maygood 

Mead 

Meadow 

Meadowgrove 

Milford 

Do 

Millard 

Milligan 

Milton 

Minden 

Missionc eek 

Montrose 

Moulton 

Mount Clare 

Mullen 

Nemaha 

Nickerson 

II Norman 

I North Platte . ... 

|| Oak 

1 1 Oakdale 

Oakland 

Oconee 

Ogalalla 

Ohiowa 

Oleyen 

Olive 

Omaha 

Omega 

Ono 

Orchard 

Ord 

Do 

Orleans 

Do 

Do 

Orum 

Osborn 

Osceola 

Osmond 

Ough 

Overton 

Oxford 

Palisade 

Palmer 

Palmvra 

Paul 

Pauline 

Pawnee City 

Do 

Pender 

Do 

Peru 

Petersburg 

Phebe 

Phillips 

Pierce 

Do 

Pilger 

Pinecamp 

Plato 

Pleasantdale 

Pleasanton 

Ponca 

Portal 

Prosser 

Do 

Purdum 



Correspondents. 



C.S.Ferris. 

F.S.Morris. 

H.C.Treas. 

Louis Andrews. 

A. D.Brown. 

Fred. Jeffrey. 

John Amsbury. 

W.M.Stewart. 

Gust Monteen. 

S.J.Stewart. 

S.W.Deuel. 

J. H. Culver. 

Stella M.Hooker. 

Henry Kelsey. 

Z.E.Minnick. 

W.C.Long. 

T.B.Keedle. 

Thos. J. Griggs. 

J . J . Wassen burger. 

L.D.Austin. 

Felix A.Killough. 

Wm. Barneby. 

V.T.Peabody. 

H.W.Herman. 

.I.F.Barnes. 

J.H.Baker. 

P.K.Hayden. 

J.H.Bretz. 

Wm. Miller. 

C.E.Chapin. 

Zeph Camp. 

V.D.Timmerman. 

John Bauer. 

Thos.O.McIntyre. 

Walter Breen. 

W.E. Wisner. 

G.G.Nott. 

Jas. Alexander. 

Jas. Milford. 

W.S.White. 

Stephen Morgan. 

John Gilligan. 

W.L. Beeman. 

Wm.M.Blew. 

Peter Rheinheimer. 

Frank Garinger. 

Boyd S.Leedom. 

Wm.Ough. 

W.R.Robbins. 

F. .I.Miller. 

J. F. Hong. 

J.C. Knapp. 

J.W.Acott. 

A.M.Durr. 

Lucien Dean. 

J. M. Rogers. 

.T.L.Clark. 

D.K.Hancock. 

W.H.Nye. 

H.H.Whitfield. 

S.D.Phillips. 

Jesse W. Lea. 

Jas. F. Kirkpatrick. 

A.M.Colson. 

A.L.Brande. 

I.B.Jeffries. 

Nelson F. Bruce. 

E.I.Turner. 

S.H.Biohot. 

.I.E.Johnson. 

.Ino. D.Forbes. 

A.H. Fricke. 

.I.R.Crow. 

A.T.Shattock. 

S.H.Oldham. 



Stations. 



Randolph 

Do 

Redwillow 

Richland 

Rising City 

Rockville 

Rosemont 

Ruby 

Ruskin 

Ryno 

St. Edwards 

Do 

St. James 

St. Paul 

Sargent 

Schuyler 

Do 

Scotia 

Scribner 

Seneca 

Shelby 

Shelton 

Shickley 

Smithfield 

Southbend 

South Sioux City. 

Spencer 

Spiker 

Springfield 

Springgreen 

staplehurst 

Stella 

Sterling 

Stockville 

Summer 

Surprise 

Swanton 

Swedehome 

Taylor 

Thornburg 

Thurston 

Tobias 

Troy 

Trybn 

Trumbull 

Unadilla 

Underwood 

Upland 

Utica 

Valley 

Venango 

Venus 

Verdigris 

Verdon 

Wabash 

Warnerville 

Waterbury 

Waterloo 

Wayland 

Wayne 

Weeping Water . 

Wellfleet 

Weston 

Do 

Westpoint 

Whitney 

Wilher 

Wilford 

Winfield 

Winnebago 

Winside 

Wolbach 

Yale 



Correspondents. 



A.W.Tredwell. 
J.L.Stewart. 
Mrs. J. F.Helm. 
John Blake. 
J.C.Percy. 
E.H. Kittle. 
W.S.Orr. 
H.O.Schaaf. 
John E.Jones. 
S.H.MeCall. 
E.S.Nichols. 
N.G. Griffin. 
Jas. G.Turner. 
I. M.Gillespie. 
J.S.Spooner. 
John C.Wolfe. 
E.H.Phelps. 
Lona H.Bohrer. 
W.L. Golden. 
D.McNall. 
J.C.Bennet. 

E. Wyman. 
C.W.Price. 
Geo.C. Junkins. 
W.J.Brownell. 
W.R.Wallace. 
R. Rockier. 
J.C.Broderson. 
J.G.Timberlake. 
E.A.Wyatt. 
G.S.Gwaltney. 
Luke Fisher. 
V.Zint. 
J.L.Saunders. 
Ed.A.Lavery. 
Chas. Ludden. 
L.O.Westcoutt. 
P.O.C'hindgrew. 
Geo F.Scott. 
R.C.Walker. 

J. B.Lammon. 

Stanlev Larson. 

R.Walsh. 

Geo. H.Daly. 

J.B.Elliott. 

H.A.Butte. 

Mrs.C. A. Underwood. 

H.O.Hendricks. 

J.C.Lloyd. 

H.M.Pouffer. 

J.M.Kimball. 

A.G.Anson. 

Jos. K.Schmidt. 

Grant Sloan. 

B.F.Allen. 

O. A. Sleeper. 

H.Sayne. 

A.I.McDougal. 

Sam H offer. 

A. J. Ferguson. 

F. F. Everett . 
W.G.Hawkins. 
M.O.Worrall. 
John Mouckler. 
.I.H.Thompson. 
Wm. McCauley. 
Joe Hynck. 
Emma T. King. 
H.G. Miller. 
H.G.Niebubu. 
R.R. Smith. 
E.A.Wright. 
D.B.Smith. 



ry^» 



]/,4 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. 



REPORT FOR JANUARY. 1899. 



NEBRASKA SECTION 



OK THE 



CLIMATE AND CROP SERVICE 



OK THE 



WEATHER BUREAU. 



PUBLISHED BY AUTHORITY OF THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE. 



UNDER DIRECTION OF 

WILLIS L. MOORE 

CHIKF OF WEATHER BITREAU 

C. A. bOVELiAND. 

SECTION DIRECTOR, 

Office. University of Nebraska. Lincoln. 




cura! Histon 






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QC 



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January, 1899. 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, 

CLIMATE AND CROP SERVICE 



WEATHER BUREAU. 



CENTRAL OFFICE: WASHINGTON, D. C. 



NEBRASKA SECTION, 

G. A. LOVELAND, Section Director, 

LINCOLN, NEBR. 



Vol. IV. 



LINCOLN, NEBR. 



No. 1 



A PLEA FOR THE PROTECTION OF OUR BIRDS. 

[Extracts from Special Bulletin Xo. 3 of the Department of Entomology of the 
I'niversity of Nebraska, by Lawrence Brunei-, Professor of Entomology.] 

" The fact that iusect depredations are increasing in ex- 
tent each succeeding year makes it plain to us that some- 
thing must be done to prevent it, and that quickly. We 
have found to our sorrow that although we make increased 
efforts to destroy these pests, our efforts avail but little, and 
the destruction of our crops goes on. What, then, is to be 
done? How can we be released from this ever increasing 
struggle for existence? 

" The answer is plain. Heed the advice of the naturalist, 
who has made a study of the life histories of the various other 
living creatures in the world about us. Do not condemn 
what he says without first at least examining into its merits. 

" In his desire for bird protection the naturalist is not 
prompted by sentiment alone — far from it! Although from 
the sentimental standpoint solely, the friend of birds would 
have sufficient grounds for making such a request. 

"It is needless here for me to state that the insect life 
about us is numerous and varied. We all know this to be 
too true. Nearly, if not quite, nine-tenths of all animal 
forms belong here, while the individuals of many kinds are 
incalculable. We know also that their powers of reproduc- 
tion are simply wonderful, being limited only by the amount 
of food available, etc. Now, the disproportionate number 
of birds on the other hand, with their 'universal distribu- 
tion, the remarkable locomotive power which enables them 
readily to escape unfavorable conditions, and their higher 
rate of life, requiring for their maintenance an amount of 
food relatively enormous,' give to them a significance which 
few seem ever to have realized. 

"Briefly told, the economic relation of birds to man lies 
in the services which they render in checking the undue in- 
crease of insects, the devouring of small rodents, in destroy- 
ing the seeds of noxious weeds, and by acting as scavengers 
on land and water. 

"Those who have studied the subject carefully have esti- 
mated that a loss of nearly $400,000,000 is sustained an- 
nually by the cultivators of the soil from insect ravages in 
the United States and Canada. This does not include the 
damage done to ornamental shrubbery, shade, and forest 
trees, nor to the grasses growing on our prairies. ' But if 



insects are the natural enemies of vegetation, birds are the 
natural enemies of insects.' 

" ' In the air swallows and swifts are coursing rapidly to 
and fro, ever in pursuit of the insects which constitute their 
sole food. When they retire, the nighthawks and whip- 
poor-wills will take up the chase, catching moths and other 
nocturnal insects which would escape day-flying birds. Fly- 
catchers lie in wait, darting from ambush at passing prey, 
and with a suggestive click of the bill returning to their 
post. The warblers, light, active creatures, flutter about 
the terminal foliage, and, with almost the skill of a hum- 
mingbird, pick insects from the leaf or blossom. The 
vireos patiently explore the under sides of leaves and odd 
nooks and corners to see that no skulker escapes. The wood- 
peckers, nuthatches, and creepers attend to the trunks and 
limbs, examining carefully each inch of bark for insects, 
eggs, and larvae, or excavating for the ants and borers they 
hear at work within. On the ground the hunt is continued 
by the thrushes, sparrows, and other birds that feed upon 
the innumerable forms of terrestrial insects. Few places in 
which insects exist are neglected; even some species which 
pass their earlier stages or entire lives in the water are 
preyed upon by aquatic birds.'* 

"In nearly every case where the food habits of our birds 
have been carefully studied, do we find that the good done 
far exceeds the possible harm that might be inflicted by our 
birds. Allowing 25 insects per day as an average diet for 
each individual bird, and estimating that we have about 
one and one-half birds to the acre, or in round numbers 
75,000,000 birds in Nebraska, there would be required 1,875,- 
000,000 insects for each day's rations. 

"Again, estimating the number of insects required to fill 
a bushel at 120, 000, it would take 15,625 bushels of insects 
to feed our birds for a single day, and 937,500 bushels for 
one hundred and fifty days. These estimates are very low 
when we take into consideration the numbers of insects that 
various of our birds have been known to destroy in a single 
day. 

(Concluded next month.) 



OBSERVERS' NOTES. 



Stock in fine condition; little hay fed as yet. — R. K. Bowden, Agee. 

Dry weather, with high winds, has heen injurious to fall-sown 
grain.— E. D. Smith, Arhorville. 

Wheat is not doing very well — too dry and cold; some corn un- 
fathered. — G. D. Carrington. Auburn. 

With exception of the last days, the month has been exceptionally 
mild. No snow at close of month and all stock on range doing well. — 
A. H. Gale, Basset t. 

The end of the month found stock in unusually good condition; very 
little hay fed.— Robt. H. Willis, Camp Clarke. 

Drilled winter grain is not injured, but that sown broadcast is in- 
jured. — Ira P. GRisw r oLD, Lexington. 

A few are not done husking yet. Late-sown wheat is badly injured; 
early-sown all right. Stock is in good condition. — F. E. Porter. 
McCool Junction. 

Weather mild; excellent for stock feeding. — A. D. Nesbit, Tekamah. 

Bad month for winter wheat and fears are entertained for the crop. — 
W. N. Hunter, Turlington. 



* Chapman, in "Bird Life." 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



January, 1899. 



COMPARISON OF PAST JANUARYS. 

The monthly maximum and minimum temperatures for several sta- 
tions have been obtained for the years ]H7(i to 1888, and the following 
table lias been revised, and differs slightly from the comparative tallies 
previously published : 



^Temperature.— 

Mean. Max. Min. Prec. 

1876 24.6 59 — 9 0.20 

1877 18.7 59 — 16 0.98 

1878 25. 5 59 —4 0.44 

1S79 20.9 68 —22 0.80 

1S80 31.9 70—2 0.38 

1881 10.8 64 — 35 0.91 

18S2 21. 1 55 —8 0.56 

i3S3 II. 2 so —34 1.04 

1884 17.3 51 — 32 0.46 

1885 12.6 55 —27 0.51 

1S86 9.9 64 —33 1. 21 

1S87 15.2 63 —30 0.49 

1 888 10.6 72 — 36 0.47 

18S9 22.4 58 —16 0.91 



1890 16.3 

1891 27.5 

1892 18.8 

1893 23.0 

1894 19.4 

1895 19-° 

1896 28.4 

1897 21.8 

1898 27.0 

1899 23.0 

Average for the 
State for past 

24 years 19.9 



—Temperature,—. 
Mean. Max. Min. Prec. 



70 
72 
65 
82 
72 
78 
66 
63 
74 



-38 
— 21 



— 20 
—21 



0.78 
1-43 
0.86 
0.13 
0.60 
0.36 
o-37 
0.79 
0.67 
0.24 



65 — 2 3 °- 6 5 



CLIMATOLOGY OF THE MONTH. 

General characteristics: The month was characterized by 
high temperature, deficient precipitation, and an absence of 
severe storms. The first and last weeks were seasonably 
cold, with minimum temperatures near or slightly below 
zero. The remainder of the month was very warm and 
pleasant. The precipitation was very light, except in the 
western section, and most of it fell as snow and during the 
last week of the month. The month was very favorable for 
stock feeding and for stock on the ranches, but the lack of 
snow was rather unfavorable for fall-sown grain, and some 
fear that wheat is materially injured. 

Atmospheric pressure: The mean pressure was 30.12 inches, 
which is 0.10 of an inch below the normal for January. 
The highest during the month was 80. G5 inches, at Omaha 
on the 1st, and the lowest, 29.62 inches, at Omaha on 
the 25th. 

Temperature: The mean temperature for the State, as de- 
termined from the records of 101 stations, was 23.0°, which 
is about 3.1° above the average of the past twenty-four years. 
The highest temperature was 74°, at Fort Robinson on the 
20th, and the lowest, 21° below zero, at Norfolk, Hartinglon, 
and Santee Agency on the 30th and Springview on the 31st. 

Wind: The prevailing direction of the wind was from the 
northwest. The average velocity was 8.8 miles an hour, 
which is 0.5 of a mile above the normal. The highest veloc- 
ity was 48 miles an hour, at Lincoln on the 28th, from the 
north. 

Precipitation: The average precipitation for the State, as 
determined from the records of 130 stations, was 0.24 of an 
inch, which is slightly more than one-third the average of 
the past twenty-four years. The largest precipitation re- 
ported at any one station was 1.50 inches, at Lodgepole, 
and the least, none, at several central and southwestern 
stations. 

Snowfall: No severe snow-storm passed across the State 
during January. 1899, and in the central and eastern sec- 
tions the snowfall was very light. In the extreme western 
portion of the State the snowfall was about normal. Almost 
all of the snow fell during the last week of the month. The 
snowfall for the State as a whole was about one-half the 
usual amount. The average snowfall (in inches) for the 
several sections was as follows: Southeastern, 1.0; north- 



eastern, 1.0; central, 0.4; southwestern, 2.5; western, 4.(5; 
northwestern, 4.7; average snowfall for the State, 2.4. 

Haloa: Lunar halos were observed on the 15th, 19th, 24th, 
27th, and 28th. 

Parhelia: Parhelia were observed on the 27th and 31st. 

Rainbows: Rainbows were observed on the 21st, 22d, and 
25th. 

Wind and humidity table. 



Stations. 



Lincoln 

North Platte 
Omaha 



Wind. 



Miles. Mean. Max. Dir. Date 



8,362 
6,593 
6,398 



8.9 
8.6 



nw. 
nw. 



Humidity. 



7i-3 
63.4 
72.8 



Low- 



Means for the six 


equal sections of the State. 






Temperature. 


Precipitation. 


Number of days- 


Sections. 


Mean. 


Aver- 
age.* 


Mean. 


Aver- 
age. + 


Rainy. 


Clear. 


Partly 
cloudy. 


Cloudy. 


Southeastern 


25.0 
21.3 
22.2 

25.6 
23-7 
20.5 

23.0 


18.5 
15- ° 

17.0 
20.8 
21.2 
17.9 

18.4 


0. 12 
0. 14 
0.05 

0.32 

0.39 

0.44 

0.24 


0.80 
0.77 
0.72 
0.69 
0.56 
0.49 

0.67 


1.8 

2-3 

1.2 
2. 1 

4.6 
2.6 

2.4 


16.0 
.6.7 
18.2 

■5-3 
17.8 
17.0 

16.8 


8.7 
9-5 
7-5 
10.7 
7.8 
9-i 
8.9 


6.3 
4-8 
5.3 
4.8 
5-3 
4-8 

5-2 




State 





* For ten years. t For twenty years. 

Supplemental precipitation table. 



Stations. 



Bartley 

Bassett 

Bellevue 

Benedict 

Bradshaw 

Burchard 

Burwell 

Chester 

Clatonia 

Cody 

Culbertson 

Dannebrog 

Eden 

Elba 

Kwing 

Fairfield 

Fairmont 

Gordon 

Greeley 

Hayes Center. . . 

Hickman 

Hooper 

Johnstown 

Lyons 

McCool .lunct . . . 

Marquette 

Merriman 

Monroe 

Nemaha 

Norman 

Odell 

Osceola 

Ough 

Palmer 

Palmyra 

Paxton 

Plattsmouth — 
Pleasanthill — 

St.Libory 

Salem 

Sargent 

Schuyler 

Sioux City, Iowa 

Spragg 

State Farm 

Stockham 

Strang 

Stratton 

Syracuse 

Tablerock 

Valparaiso 

Wallace 

Wauneta 

Wilber 

Willard 

Wisner 

Yankton, S. Dak 



Counties. 



Red Willow 

Rock 

Sarpy 

York 

York 

Pawnee — 

Garfield 

Thayer 

Gage 

Cherry 

Hitchcock . 
Howard . . . 
Nemaha . . . 

Howard 

Holt 

Clay 

Fillmore ... 
Sheridan. . . 
Greeley — 

Hayes 

Lancaster . 

Dodge 

Brown 

Burt 

York 

Hamilton .. 

Cherry 

Platte 

Nemaha ... 
Kearney . .. 

Gage 

Polk 

Dundy 

Merrick 

Otoe 

Keith 

Cass 

Saline 

Howard . .. 
Richardson 

Custer 

Colfax 



Rock 

Lancaster. 
Hamilton 
Fillmoi'e . . 
Hitchcock 

Otoe 

Pawnee ... 
Saunders.. 
Lincoln . . . 

Chase 

Saline 

Lincoln . . . 
Cuming .. . 



Length 
of rec- 
ord , y rs 



Total. 



o. 10 
o. 19 
0.05 
0.07 

O. OS 



'I'. 

0.05 



0.50 

0.44 



O. 20 

T. 
0.28 

T. 

T. 
o. 20 

T. 
0.50 
0.20 
0.07 



0.12 
0.03 
0.20 
0.80 
0.07 
o. 10 



0.00 
T. 

0.60 
T. 

0.09 

0.30 



0.22 
0.12 
o. 20 



0.05 
0.1.8 
o. 10 



o. so 

f. 

0.49 

0.0s 
0.17 

0.76 
0.60 
T. 
0.03 
0.07 
0.18 



Depart- 
ure from 
normal. 



-o-53 
-0.99 



-0.62 
-0.21 



-0.48 



-0.24 
-1.08 
-0.72 



-0.28 
-0. 17 



-0.61 



— 0.46 
— 0.30 

+ 0.2.5 

—0.80 

— 0.21 



-0.34 
-O.3O 



-O.38 
-0-55 



— 0. 16 
— 0.40 

+0.07 

— 0.62 

—0.23 

+0.06 



No. 
rainy 
days. 



Observers. 



R.S.Baker. 

A. H. Gale. 

E.F.Stouffer. 

R.B. Brabham. 

E.C.Roggy. 

J. A. Kinscy. 

W.S.Green. 

W.J. Kissick. 

F.W.. Jones. 

W.E.Pontius. 

Mrs. L. A. VV'ibley. 

W..I. Melson. 

D.J. Wood. 

S.M.VVellman. 

G.H. Benson. 

M. L.Jones. 

(J. H. Borden. 

Amos Burwell. 

J. A.Pinkcrton. 

R.C.Orr. 

O.O.Franklin. 

T.W.Lyman. 

F.Avery. 

N.R.Kellam. 

F.E.Porter. 

John Ellis. 

F. Hussong. 

Wm. Webster. 

R.J. Duff. 

J.F.Barnes. 

I.B.Huffman. 

g. W. Murbarger. 

Wm.Oueh. 

E.H.Smith. 

W.D.Bancroft. 

Frank N. Pearl. 

W.Z.Pickett. 

J. W. Ingles 

W.I.Meader. 

W.W.McDcrmet. 

J.S.Spooner. 

L.N.Dickinson. 

Weather Bureau. 

S. W. Spragg. 

s.W.Periri. 

J.W.Gray. 

S.Diller. 

C. W.Shurtliff. 

L.Howell. 

S.H.Dopp. 

W . J . Craven . 

H.S.Toogood. 

J.W.Haun. 

S.E.Davis. 
Wesley W.Lewis. 
Geo. W.Howe. 
Weather Bureau. 



J 



Januaby, 1809. 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



Climatolog-ical data for Nebraska, January, 1899. 



NORTHEASTERN SEC. 

Agee * 

Blair 

Columbus 

Creighton 

Fremont 

Hartington 

Lynch* 

Madison 

Norfolk 

Oakdale 

Omaha 

O'Neill 

Santee Agency 

Stanton * 

Tekamah 

Wakefield 

Westpoint 

Southeastern Sec. 

Arborville* 

Ashland 

Auburn * 

Aurora * 

Beatrice 

Crete 

David City 

Dawson * 

Edgar * 

Fairbury 

Geneva 

Harvard 

Hebron 

Lincoln 

Nebraska City 

Rulo* 

Seward * 

Superior* 

Teeumseh 

Turlington 

VVeepingwater * 

Wymore* 

York* 

Central Sec. 

Albion 

Ansley 

Ashton* 

Brokenbow* 

Callaway 

Central City* 

Dunning* 

Ericson * 

Genoa 

Gothenburg 

Grand Island 

Kearney* 

Lexington 

Loup* 

North Loup 

Ord * 

Ravenna 

St. Paul* 

Southwestern Sec. 

Alma* 

Arapahoe* 

Beaver City 

Benkelman* 

Bluehill* 

Curtis 

Franklin 

Haigler * 

Hastings* 

Holdrege* 

Imperial 

McCook * 

Madrid* 

Mind en 

Redcloud* 

Republican* 

Wilsonville 

Western Sec. 

Camp Clarke 

Gering 

Kimball 

Lodgepole 

Nesbit 

North Platte 

Seneca* 

Thedford* 

Whitman* 

Northwestern Sec. 

Alliance * 

Fort Robinson 

Hay Springs 

Kennedy 

Kirkwood * 

Springview 

Valentine 



Counties. 



Holt 

Washington . 

Platte 

Knox 

Dodge 

Cedar 

Boyd 

Madison 

....do 

Antelope 

Douglas 

Holt 

Knox 

Stanton 

Burt 

Dixon 

Cuming 



York 

Saunders 

Nemaha 

Hamilton ... 

Oage 

Saline 

Butler 

Richardson . 

Clay 

Jefferson 

Fillmore 

Clay 

Thayer 

Lancaster... 

Otoe 

Richardson . 

Seward 

Nuckolls 

Johnson 

Otoe 

Cass 

Ciage 

York 



Boone 

Custer 

Sherman 

Custer 

...do 

Merrick 

Blaine 

Wheeler 

Platte 

Dawson 

Hall 

Buffalo 

Dawson 

Sherman 

Valley 

...do 

Buffalo 

Howard 



Harlan 

Furnas 

...do 

Dundy 

Webster — 

Frontier 

Franklin 

Dundy 

Adams 

Phelps 

Chase 

Red Willow. 

Perkins 

Kearney — 

Webster 

Harlan 

Furnas 



Cheyenne .. . 
Scotts Bluff. 

Kimball 

Cheyenne ... 

Logan 

Lincoln 

Thomas 

...do 

Grant 



Box Butte . . 

Dawes 

Sheridan — 

Cherry 

Rock 

Keya Paha . . 
Cherry 



, IOO 

,051 
,792 
,235 
,36s 

,619 
945 
,722 
,3i6 
,633 
,812 
,458 
,'99 
941 
842 
,435 
,574 
,H3 
,214 
,080 
,222 
,642 

1.747 
2,3°7 
2,061 
2,477 
2,555 
1, 70S 
2,621 
2,029 
1,584 
2,557 
1,860 
2, 146 
2,385 
2,067 
1,961 



2,028 
1,796 

',939 
2,173 
2,147 
2,968 
1,967 
2,553 
1,820 
3,256 
',932 
2,324 
3,278 
2,506 
3,294 
2, 169 
1,687 
1,939 
2,298 

3,700 



4,697 
3,820 



2,841 
2,971 
2,842 
3,588 

3,968 

3, 764 
3,821 



2,613 



Temperature, in degrees Fahrenheit. 



20.9 
21.8 
23.2 
19.0 
21.9 
1S.8 
19. 1 
24.0 
19.8 
20.0 

25-1 
20.4 
21.0 
20.0 
22.7 
2r. 1 
23.2 

23-9 

2t-9 

25.8 

25.4 
24.4' 

26.2 

22.2 

28.7 
26.6 
24.4 
23-9 
24.2 
25-1 

25-8 
24.4 
29.9 
24.0 
25.6 
31-4 
24.6 
19.4 
26.6 
23.2 

20.7' 
23-0 
22.0 



22.6 
21.5 
20.0 
19.0 
22.6 
23.8 
25.0 
24.4 
21.8 
21.9 
22.0 
20.8 
24.4 
25-9 

26.6 
25.6 
28.1 
2.5-4 
26.2 
25.0 
23.2 
28.2 
25-3 



26.8 

27-5 
22.4 
24.8 



23- 5 s 
24.8 



21.4 



24.4 
23.8 
22.6 

25-5 
24.0 
23.6 
24. 4 1 

20.5 
20.8 
21.3 
23-3 
19.1 
17.8 

21. O 






+ '•9 



0.0 
+3-' 
+5-2 
+ 2.1 
+0.5 



+ 2.8 
+ 2.6 
+5-9 
+0.7 

+5-3 
+0.9 

+ 1-7 



+0.3 
+2.8 
+2.2 
—0.5 
+0.9 
+6.5 
+ 2.1 



+ 1.0 



—0.3 
+0.9 

+ 2.5 
+5-8 
+3-9 
+0.7 
— 1-3 
+ 1-7 
+8.9 
+ 2.9 
+ 2.2 



+0.7 
— 1.2 



— 1.4 

— '•3 
—5-4 

— 1.8 
+4-8 
+0.2 
+ ..4 
—°.5 
-3-1 
—2.7 
+ 1.2 



+ ■.! 



—0.3 
—2.4 



—2.9 
—0.9 



+ 1.4 



+ 1.0 
—0-5 
- 2.0 
+4-2 



—2.6 
—2.6 



—0.7 
+4-4 



+ i-9 
+ 0.2 



+3-' 
+ 1.2 



— 2.0 
+3-4 



2lt 



23t 



22+ 



— 16 



Precipitation, in inches. 



46 



5" 



0.27 
0.08 
o. 01 
o. 10 

0.15 
0.85 

o. 16 

0. 12 

O.O5 
O.08 
0.07 
0.18 
0.16 
O.Oq 
O.07 

0-13 
T. 

T. 

0.03 
0.27 
0.05 

T. 
0.23 
0.40 
o. 14 
0.05 

T. 
0.17 
0.01 
0.05 

O. II 

0.18 

0.20 
0.24 
O.OO 
O.O5 
O.32 

o-35 
T. 
T. 



0.04 
0.09 



T. 
0.07 
0.20 
o. 12 
0.00 
0.05 

T. 
0.60 

T. 
0.05 
o. 16 

o. 10 
0.20 
0. 10 

0.40 

T. 



0.00 
0.30 
0.04 
T. 
1. 00 
0.50 
0.60 
0.03 
0.04 
0.20 
0.30 

0.80 



0.65 
1.50 
0.10 
0.1 1 
0.20 
0.15 



0.43 
0.28 
0.41 

0-55 
0.42 

0.95 
0.47 



s 

*g 
SI 



— o. 24 



—0.33 
— 0.61 
—0.84 
— 0.05 
—0.18 

— 0.25 
— 0.25 
—0-49 
— 0.62 
—0.30 
—0.48 
—0.18 
— 0.71 
— 0.41 
—0.69 

— 0.46 
—0.63 
— 0.52 
— o. 25 

—0.45 

— 0.72 
— 0.46 
— 0.71 
—0.45 
--0.7S 
—0.30 
—0.54 
—0.77 

— 0.62 
—0.66 
—0.72 
— 0.40 
—0.57 

— 1. 01 
—0.32 
—0.56 



—0.57 



-0.41 
-0.08 



-0.22 
-o. 54 



-0.52 
-0.76 
-0.28 
-0.47 

-0-57 
-0.67 
-0.26 
-0.20 
-0.30 
-0.66 
-0.31 



— o. 13 
+0.11 
—0.32 



—0.43 
+0. 10 

—0-39 
—0.48 
+0.30 
+0. 19 
+0.14 
—0-95 
—0.28 
— 0.04 
+ 0.03 



0.00 
+ 0.91 
—0-39 
—0.36 
—0.13 
— 0.27 
— 0.17 

—0.56 
— 0.50 
— 0.42 
— o. 10 
—0.18 
+0.46 
— 0.10 



0.27 
0.04 
o. 01 
o. 10 

0.15 

o-37 
o. 14 

0.05 

0.02 
0.05 

0.03 

o. 10 

O. II 

0.09 
0.05 

0.08 
T. 

T. 

0.03 
o. 10 
0.05 

T. 
0. 10 
0.20 
0.06 
0.05 

T. 
o. 10 
o. 01 
0.05 
0.04 
0.13 
0.20 
0.22 
0.00 
0.05 
0.25 
0.20 

T. 

T. 



0.02 
0.07 



T. 
T. 



T. 
0.05 
0.20 
0.05 
0.00 
0.05 

T. 
0.50 

T. 
0.04 
0. 10 



0.10 
o. 10 

0.30 
T. 



0.00 
0.30 
0.02 
T. 
0.50 
0.30 
0.20 
0.02 
0.03 
0.20 
0.20 

0.60 



0.30 
0.60 
o. 10 
0.05 
o. 10 
0-15 
o. 10 

0.25 

o. 10 

0.20 
O.25 
O.42 
O.9O 
O.32 



5 « 



0.3 
0.4 
T. 
2.0 
1-5 
5-5 
1.8 
1.0 
1.0 
0-5 



0.8 
'•5 
T. 
0-5 
0.8 
T. 

T. 

0.3 
2.2 

0.5 
T. 
2.0 
1.0 
0.9 

£ 5 
T. 

1.0 

T. 

o-5 
1.2 



2.0 
0.2 
0.0 
o-5 
3-0 
3-5 
T. 
T. 



0.5 
T. 



T. 
T. 



T. 

0-5 

2.0 

1.2 

0.0 

0-5 



£ 5 
T. 



1.0 
2.0 
1.0 
4.0 



3-o 
T. 



9-5 
5-0 
6.0 
0.2 
0.4 
2.0 
3-0 

8.0 



6-5 
15.0 
1.0 
1.8 
2.0 

1-5 
1.0 

3-5 
2.8 
3-5 
5-0 
4.0 
9-5 



.§•3 

E 

3 



Sky. 



o m 



B 

3 






9 

8 
14 
13 

8 

5 
6 

I 

4 
14 

8 
15 
17 

4 

9 

4 

16 



6 
9 
23 



a 
3 

J5 



■3° 



nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

n. 

w. 

nw. 

nw. 

sw. 

s. 

nw. 

s. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

sw. 

s. 

n. 

nw. 
n. 
sw. 
nw. 



s. 

n. 

nw. 

nw. 

sw. 

nw. 



s. 

sw. 

nw. 

nw. 

se. 

nw. 

sw. 

se. 



nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

n. 

sw. 



sw. 

nw. 

nw. 

w. 

s. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

s. 

se. 

nw. 



nw. 

nw. 

sw. 

s. 

nw. 

n. 

s. 

nw. 

ne. 

nw. 

sw. 

nw. 

nw. 

w. 



nw. 



w. 

w. 

sw. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 
sw. 



nw. 
w. 
nw. 
nw. 



Observers. 



R.E.Bowden. 

E. A. Palmer. 

C.C.Gray. 

Dr. Geo. Roberts. 

Wm. J. Phillips. 

T. B.A.Watson. 

C.C.Irwin. 

Dr. F.A.Long. 

Dr. P. H.Salter. 

G.S.Clingman. 

U. S. Weather Bureau. 

O.M.Collins. 

W.H.Hamlin. 

W.Gerecke. 

Dr. A. D. Nesbit. 

I. H. Weaver. 

C.J.Kadish. 

E.D.Smith. 

Dr. A. S. v Mansfelde. 

G.D.Carrington. 

H.C.Miller. 

C.Kellam. 

Doane College. 

E.B.Taylor. 

M.L.Libbee. 

L.L. Fuller. 

W.F.Cramb. 

F.M.Flory. 

Dr. J. T.Fleming. 

Dr.C.M.Eastori. 

U. S. Weather Bureau. 

E.Morton. 

W.F.Gingrich. 

L.E.Ost. 

L.W.Hahn. 

C.M.Miller. 

Wm.N. Hunter. 

(i. Treat. 

H.B.Ware. 

O.P.Lowry. 

F.A.Pettinger. 
Chas.R.Hare. 
F.Rein. 
H.L.Ormsby. 
Geo. B.Mair. 
J.A.McRae. 
L.L. Williams. 
A.Dahl. 

Keo. S.Truman. 
A. V.Carlson. 
E.Corbin. 
C. E. Magner. 
Ira P.Griswold. 
E.S.Hayhurst. 
J. E.Uoodrich. 
.las. Milford. 
Erastus Smith. 
Paul Anderson. 

R.E. Pitcher. 
J F. Edwards. 
C.G.George. 
W.E. Winger. 
C.S. Draper. 
Dr. S.R. Razee. 
F.T.Owen. 
T.P.F. Haine. 
J. C.S warts. 

C. Engstrom. 
Robert Malcolm. 
C.T.Watson. 
John McKenzie. 
Joel Hull. 
G.M.Stevens. 
W.Burdon. 

D. F. Hostetter. 

Robt. H.Willis. 

J.P.Finley. 

F.J. Bellows. 

A.B.Persinger. 

G.E.Bolkrom. 

U. S. Weather Bureau. 

F.D.Gallup. 

O.G.Norton. 

D.McNall. 

J.Kridelbaugh. 
Post surgeon. 

C. A. Waterman. 

D. A.Piercy. 
Mrs.C. A. Arter. 
Miss Ezada Phelps. 
U.S. Weather Bureau. 



* Temperature data from thermometers not self registering. + Occurred on more than one day. \ '', », etc., indicate number of days missing from observed readings. 
All records are used in determining State or district means, but State and district departures are determined by comparison of current data of only stations with normals. 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



January, 1899. 









I 



uilV 



00 OOCC — N 
if, — 00 to if) 



nno o^ -u- 
to" o n — 



no cn cn ir.vo 
no' « o tr. N 



- s 



x^iv 



if, — NNO no 



CN NO NOO O N\0 'fNN 

'MOf^ NCO ifj O N >- « 
to tJ- to <0 to (OmfO«trt 



OnO if) O O 

NO N*o" CO 



- 0\N • CO 



if. ifj « OCO 
CN NO TO 00 4" 



n o o a- a*. 
n t w rox 



CO CO - 00*0 



n C ~ <f. if, 

KO'CO If) in 



u~, o ^j- n m 
n I-.* irj to uo 



rooo" SO NO vd 



CO O if, O to 



rococo o« 

-■' if, o -" 4- 



(N O O 04 CN 
tOOO to N 



to a^\o co co 



"!K 



I if,CO O nO CO O ' 



O fO O O co \0 OX MN co **- O N CO if)00 NOO 



»vo o io tnt 



XBH I 



to to if, <o 



CO if) ■« to to 



OOtO O CO 04 N O O nO O CO O CN m if> o N if) fO to t fO 



uiiv 



NO O O t (N 



•ootor^io onOtj-on"-* 



nc© u0 On u-; 



tJ- to « too n m 



I O NO 



tsrOI>. OCO 



»*M 



MO h.iOO *h 



o o tM ncc 



to to co t OO O 



co O if) to fO — O O O 



ii'W 



t "<*- t if t cONOtOtNfNl 



O 0\N to co CM N O nOnO OnO nO 



O to t m On 



xt*Kl 



t NN0 tfi — 



no n if to 



CN J^CO O CO 



»!K 



O CO NnO if CM tNO i 



On t O to NO CO i 



if-coto— if o - oC c 



) no tt if no ■ 



x^iv l 



n n n too 



N O OO -i NO 



O O t O CO«iOOnO 



'"!W 



O (N O nO •- 



4 NO if •* COOnOnO 



□0 tOcO NO to t to t ■- 



N fO if fOOO 



xv-K I 



to if -. r^ if cn no tec *o 



IT) CO NO o 



CO if t On On 



ii'IM 



1 t^. ON ON ■- CN NNO 



< CO O N N tOC CO O 



■ ON >0 NOC h O 



■xuiv : 



N<r, uiO O 



to CM CO t CN t to 



n o. O to 



NO On N On 



■mit 



x^i\[ I 



t ONCO if 



: ncc if to 



t N TfNO 



NO nO O if n Nno on 



■ Q-. "I OtoONtO' 



-+ t CO CO t 



0O i/^Inm * nOOnCnOO 



»!K 



<n to on o in o c 



lOO OnO N CO i 



CO NIT; 0\ ' 



if to I^NO c 



co cni no ^- e 



oco co o 



rxttW | 



CO ■* "^nO CO 



On OncO t- 



^ ^ ^ tO Tl- 



tO t]- Tf ^J- to 



- OO to r-NO rO On c 



«!K 



CO CNI NO ^ 



to ^,h roa 



' X K [\[ ! 



ON — o NO 



*U!W 



; t o «3- - ^- tp 
W 'f -fl" 



t-- u"j r-^ 

M NtH Q\ 



oo r»- cn "*■ . 

t to f CO 
O tHOC i 



CO 04 ND !-■ CO 
to 1Q CO tQ CO 

i/-, _, o i- On" 



NO CM 00 fO 



' m CO NO t-* ONCO 



"XUW J 



j no r^co co g co u-) c 



•-I to OnnO •+ 



„• U !K 



■ tONO O NO 



f.NO 

i-co 



-u-.nOWCO vO N U- f^ ' 



"4-00 CO ir. C 



W u", to 00 



no m i-s. ^r i-s. 



xv.yt | 



OnO On ""i 

fpNQ •& *t *n 



■> NO ■*!- W.nO 



) NO NO »ONO 



CO * t^. ON to c 

^TINO m l/j l/". N£ 



■uik 



CO if, i/. f f» f--NO On m On O. M no O 



00 *NO N 



On CO NO NO 



00 0J NO - 



■xbj\i ! 



uiK 



fO O* Q W to 
ir. lt.no io u-v 

" ic \n\n »- o 



cn n Hir,0 
t tnif, i f , m 
: r- - if, w 



N tO ITj 

t o m m mif) 
co tONO 6 m 



■ t to o NO no 



tO CO 00 O On - 



o o - o o 



■xbivI 



to 1- o o o 



co to m to o 



HNQ tf- t ■* 



uik 



no m -fO no 



OnO O ON NOCNI-.ONIC 



ONNTtO 



tn cni to tj- On 



rxnM j 



r^-co in •*■ 



cni t toco - 



itocNto Nor^tNiON 



Vj Cni On CO 



r to t--cO m 



cooor-vNNO o Oi-to o 



t; i ' u *w I 



XBKI 



uik 



■xttiv I 



■tTj-O tN 



■n- u~, i^.no On 



ONii-iOC O On — On- O On 



i O (OifjO 



ifj O CO O to 



ifj oo if.NO o *n 



if too to 



IT.NO O N « 



OCO NO u"j 



i- ■<*■ t On 



N ir. O On 



O-OO no no NO 



NO O 00 if. 



. O-) On nO if.00 ON to ONCO r- 



«f, oi -*■ « 

CO - CO CO 



no cni 

CN «__« CN >n 

IfjttCI IT, 

1 H M p| N 



- mr-* r- on On O 



uiM 



fO fO "- NO CO 



if,NO o o 



— If. Tf • fO 



x*Ki 



i-COCOCNm CO h noco 



NO On - NO 



■+ if, if, r^co 



B 

a 

s 
3 



•a 

a 

d 

5 

a 

e3 



uik 



■xuitfl 



OnOOQ'O ocoo toco 



0>N N ON 



■uik 



C4 no to nO 



t- Ifj 01 ONCO 



> NO On if- >r. if, 

^ m - fO CN (N 



•xbkI 



■j if , if . if, to ^J- * 



»fj CO NO 



uik 



XBK I 



„• uik 



00 On o o 

_ " tvo J f - ,n "1. 

hoO O « N 



O if.CO On ■*• 



no CO On ■- On 

O CN CO CN! 



x^iv i 



t -3- r0 if , to 



O N t ifj f.NO 
It"* fO t Tfr if . t 



j "UJK 

|-XBM~| 



r.NO N 



•utjv 



fO ■rl- *NX 



if,\D On fO — 



■xbkI 



o o oom 



V t to t Tt to t to 



uiK 



NO o O if i ■*■ 



O O N if, O 



1- OnO O 



"X13K | 



fO On N CN CN 



tO CN fO ** C 



•c no tONO r^ 



■"!K 



rj- O if, to CM 



if, CI O CO O NO "3" to 



■XRK 



nOONN—N O fl t 
ro CN to to ro to ro 



uik 



XBKl 



M NO fOOO NO O ■<* 



O fO CO ro O COOONh 



J "4-NO ■<*■ On CO CN! ■- 



uik 



i- CT.vO **■ M 



■xbk I 



•ujk 



H O tlONC 



- O ^- CO COCC CO ifi 



x^iv 1 



If, Oi fOlfJM 



* tNO o to 



uik 



CO if) o o vo 



OnnO ON to C 



■x«k I 



COCOttlO ON—NCNNO 



uik 



OCO NO to 



-NOCNOifj -NO Ot 



•xt?k I 



tO »f,NO On fO 



•O if, N On OnNOnMNO 



uik 



On O »f)NO 



■ -r tj- if i o co if) o if,NO 



•XBKl 



Q ^ 0. K S 

S S " 3 * 



09 



0,0 






— 0> If, r •-" 



00 CO o — no 



NO if, N On 

IT! t t t ^ 

CCNO - - N 



OCO ON 
0) oco o ■+■ 



r- i^. oco co 

t -d- -* ■* t 



no to if, oo oo *r ir, if. 



— NO tO 1^ o 



CO CO 

_ 6coo o 



O no if) 

t >o u-. -r -t 

CM CO If) tO N* 



OD H tO 



f 00 00 o 00 NO 00 



co O CO tO 



OO t If - CO 



CO ON tON£ 



O to to o 



If, CM NO 



OOCONO COOJOtOCO 



On NO NO 



00 o o 



O0 CN NO If NO 



3 NO If) to tCO fO * 



O if . N if, - 



CO 00 If) to 

m^ t ^t- to 

no 0) - O O 



OO fO t fO O 
t co m co u-i 

if , O CN O O 



O tNO if.CO 



oco t — 



OCOOnco ifjcOO tOCO NO tO to — co O O if O0 O O fO O N - 



CN MM 



iTflf) COOCNCOlf) if, (NO" 



co tOO no O 
c o to on o i co 
Tj-NO CN N Tj- 



O CM 04 NO If) 

CO 04 CO CO fO_ 

co fO fOOO "-t 



CO coco t^» O 



if) if) tONO if) if , ifi m N00 



OCN ONO 



-Otif) NONOtt 



JnOnOO iftCNOito 



m NO NO NC0 O ifNO nONN CC O ^N^ NN if,NO CO tO CN NO if ; to 



O no co tf ) CO 



NO if . co O N 



OnO mQn * O if , On ^ i-.M4f)"tN 



NO •* - O ; 



- ONO - 

_ ( N M CN 04 CN. 

CO O O CO if) 



N NO t if) — 



1-04 O "3" 'f) 



O to no t 
NO Oi 00 NO NO 



O to O m t 



O « O if,NO 

— O if. f) to 



if , N 't OCO 



O N If) CO CO 



CO if, co — O OO lOOO' 






O if. O f - 



ON - 



t o'cn i- r^ to no if i 



-OOCOO OOfO't if)CC 



OC>N0 coONOnO NNOi 



§«•& 15 i£g al?ci 1^g»2 IS^SI 
IlIsS ='l-=1s ESfti E = = =f |§Jg« 



; ;< 
ZZZCC 



° ? , 



= :}!iE 

~ 5 « — > 

C — -y. f. r- 












55 



Oh 



< 

C-c 

O 




> 

c 



\NK1 ^ 






T3 

a 



, 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



January, 1809. 



Daily precipitation for Nebraska, January, 1899. 



Stations. 


Day of month. 




i. 


2. 


3- 


4- 


5. 


6. 


7- 


8. 


9- 


10. 


11. 


12. 


13- 


14- 


15- 


16. 


17- 


18. 


19- 


20. 


21. 


22. 


23- 


24. 


25- 


26. 


27- 


28. 


29. 


30. 


3'- 


03 

C 

E- 












t 












1 


'1- 








t 












.27 






t 






t 


t 






0.27 


















































































.18 




t 


t 


•25 










t 
.10 

t 


<M3 
0. 10 
0.04 

t 
0.03 
0.27 
0.05 
0. 10 
0. 19 

t 


































































































.01 






.01 
t 








.02 

t 

t 

.10 
•°5 
.01 


t 
•°5 


































t 
t 












t 
t 
.02 


"t 






t 

■03 
.10 














t 








t 


t 






























































t 
















t 










t 








































































.02 


.02 

t 














t 






















t 












•'9 


t 




t 














































t 
.10 

■f 


"t 








































t 














t 
















































t 








. 10 
.01 


0.40 














.01 










t 


.02 


t 








+ 










+ 




t 




t 


.04 

t 






































t 
























































































* 


































































































t 
.00 


"t 


t 




























































t 

t 


t 
0.80 

O.OI 
























t 

t 

.10 
.01 






















. 10 


t 




t 


•05 

t 


• 05 

.01 
















t 










t 
















































































t 


.02 








1 














t 
.02 












. 10 
.02 


.10 

• 3° 




0.23 
0.50 










































.06 


•°5 


•05 






























































t 








. 10 

+ 


.20 

t 


































.10 
.06 


.t 


t 




0.40 
0.14 




















.06 






















.02 






















































































































• 05 
.... 


t 


0.05 

+ 

t 

0.27 


























t 










t 
























t 
t 
.02 


















































t 
.08 


t 

.02 


t 
•05 














































.10 






t 




































































t 

.07 
.02 




























t 










•■5 


"t 


0.15 

0.17 
0.07 






















t 

+ 










t 






t 






t 








t 

•°5 


t 


.10 

t 


































t 


















































































t 


t 




t 






t 




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*/ 



OF THE 

"I1LINCIS. 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. 



REPORT FOR FEBRUARY. 1899. 



NEBRASKA SECTION 



OF THE 



CLIMATE AND CROP SERVICE 



OK THE 



WEATHER BUREAU. 



PUBLISHED BY AUTHORITY OF THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE. 



UNDER DIRECTION OF 



WILLIS L. MOORE 

CHIEF OF WEATHER BUREAU 

l;Y 
G. A. bOVEbAND, 

SUCTION DIRECTOH, 

Office. University o? Nebraska, bincolp. 




turai Hisiuiy t- 



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February, 1899. 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



3 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, 

Climate and Crop Service 

OF THE 

WEATHER BUREAU. 

CENTRAL OFFICE: WASHINGTON, D. C. 



NEBRASKA SECTION, 
G. A. LOVELAND, Section Director, 

LINCOLN, NEBR. 



Vol. IV. 



LINCOLN, NEBR. 



No. 2. 



A PLEA FOR THE PROTECTION OF OUR BIRDS. 

[Extracts from Special Bulletin No. 3 of the Department of Entomology of the 
University of Nebraska, by Lawrence Brunei', Professor of Entomology.] 

Concluded. 

" For example, the stomachs of four chickadees contained 
1,028 eggs of cankerworms. Four others contained about 
600 eggs and 105 mature females of the same insect. The 
stomach of a single quail contained 101 potato beetles; and 
that of another upwards of 500 chinch-bugs. A yellow-billed 
cuckoo shot at six o'clock in the morning contained 43 tent 
caterpillars. A robin had eaten 175 larvte of ]{ihi<>, which 
feed on the roots of grasses, etc., etc. 

" Birds, like all other animals, feed upon that food which 
is most readily obtained; hence, the insectivorous kinds 
destroy those insects which are most numerous — the injur- 
ious species. 

" Estimating that there is a single grasshopper, katydid, 
or cricket to each square yard of surface, it would require at 
least 650,000 bushels of these insects to cover the State. 
Not taking into account any of the myriads of other insect 
forms nor the rapid rate of reproduction which is going on 
among them, these alone would be more than two-thirds 
enough insect food for our birds during the year. This 
being true, it is plain that at least twice as many birds could 
find the proper insect food in our State each year. 

" A perusal of the various works that have been written 
on the economic relations of birds to man will support the 
statement that if we were deprived of the services of birds 
the earth would soon become uninhabitable. 

" In addition to the actual good that birds do, as recorded 
above, in the destruction of noxious insects, many of them 
are engaged for at least one-half of the year in hunting out 
and devouring the seeds of various weeds and other, to us, 
useless plants. Such is the mission of the various sparrows, 
snowbirds, finches, and long-spurs which often occupy our 
fields in flocks of thousands during the winter months. 

" If, after ascertaining such truths as the above regarding 
birds, we continue to slaughter them, it is not due to thought- 
lessness on our part. We do it wilfully and maliciously. 
The schoolboy may thoughtlessly rob a bird's nest or kill a 
bird or two. It is the duty of teacher and parent alike to 
teach him better, to show him how wrong it is to destrov life 



uselessly. It is especially their duty to prevent the destruc- 
tion of birds. If each schoolboy in the State of Nebraska 
were to rob a nest of say five bird's eggs, what would be 
the result? Yet the making of bird-egg collections is get- 
ting to be such a " fad " that almost every boy enters into 
it more or less zealously at some time or other. Some single 
collectors in a single season take 500 or more eggs. This 
should be stopped. We can study birds and their nests 
without destroying either. A live bird is more interesting 
than a dead one. An. egg left in a nest where it will in due 
time become a live creature is of more interest than an 
empty egg-shell. 

"We, as citizens of the United States, pride ourselves on 
being highly civilized and humane. We are in some direc- 
tions ; in others, not. We also claim to be intensely practi- 
cal and business-like in everything. Are we? " 



COMPARISON OF PAST FEBRUARYS. 



The monthly maximum am 

tions have been obtained for 

table has been revised, ami di 

previously published : 

^Temperature.— , 

Mean. Max. Min. free. 

1876 29.7 68 —14 0.55 

'877 34.2 61 12 0.31 

1878 34.0 66 9 0.31 

1879 22.6 60 —13 0.80 

1880 28.3 66 — 8 0.18 

1881 18.2 57 —29 1.64 

1882 32.5 68 —8 0.63 

1883 17.2 65 —32 0.92 

1884 17-5 59 —39 0-69 

1885 18.0 57 —24 0.84 

1886 27.2 78 —19 0.84 

1887 18.2 66 —25 0.78 

1R88 28.4 68 —20 0.74 

1889 23.4 66 —27 0.29 



I minimum temperatures for several sta- 
the years 1876 to 1888, and the following 
ffers slightly from the comparative tables 



^Temperature.-, 

Mean. Max. Min. 

1890 25.2 74 —29 

1891 17.6 85 —30 

1892 28.1 71 —10 

1893 21.4 68 —28 

1894 19. 1 6,5 — 21 

1895 20-2 77 —34 

1896 32.7 82 —6 

1897 27.2 74 —20 

1R98 30.6 70 — 9 

1899 12. 1 74 —47 

Average for the 
State for past 

24 years 24.3 68 —20 



Prec. 
0.36 

'•13 
0.99 
0.84 
0.58 
0.80 
o. 16 
0-59 
o-43 
0.61 



0.67 



OBSERVERS' NOTES. 

No loss to stock on account of cold weather and rye is not injured. — 
R. E. Bowden, Agee. 

From 1st to 15th was very severe on stock; many wen; bleeding at 
nose and weak ones perished. — Robt. H. Willis, Camp Clarke. 

Farmers gathered corn from 15th to 22d; wheat reported much in- 
jured by dry, cold weather. — G. U. Cakkington*, Auburn. 

First of month exceedingly cold; when the weather moderated many 
farmers gathered corn; considerable corn yet to lie gathered. — F. F. 
Stouffeb, Bellevue. 

Coldest February this station has noted in past fifteen years; no loss 
in stock is noted. — A. H. Gale, Bassett. 

Winter grain is in good condition. — Ira P. Giuswolo. Lexington. 

From 1st to 12th the coldest continued spell for years; lots of hay 
fed; but little loss in cattle so far. — A. B. Peusixger, Lodgepole. 

Frost out of the surface sufficient for plowing for wheat; all stock 
passed safely through the winter; not one per cent of loss. — Wm. G. 
Hawkins, Welltleet. 

Wheat injured: live stock uninjured. — Joel Hii.l, Minden. 

No loss of stock; no fatalities from cold. — A. D. Nesbit, Tekamah. 

Feed plenty; stock healthy: potatoes nearly all frozen. — F. E. Pou- 
ter, McCool Junction. 

The month has been exceedingly bad on range stock: some stock- 
men sutTcred loss, others none, but all stock in poor condition. — F. J. 
Bellows, Kimball. 

Temperature changed 80 degrees between a. m. of 12th and noon 
of 13th. — C. E. Magner, Kearney. 

Large numbers of bushels of potatoes and apples are reported as 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



February, 1899. 






being lost in severe cold of first few days <>f month; prospects for 
wheat good.— Wm. N. Hunter, Turlington. 

Winter wheat sown broadcast in poor condition; that sown with ttie 
press drill in fair shape. — Erastds Smith, Ravenna. 

But very few days in the month that snow was not on the ground, 
and on the last days considerable snow in sight, but all gone from the 
sunny slopes.— Mrs. L. A. Wiblky, Culbertson. , 



CLIMATOLOGY OF THE MONTH. 

(Ian-mi characteristics: The month was characterized by 
exceedingly low temporal are, being the coldest February 
since t lie commencement of records, and one of the coldest, 
months in the past twenty-four years. The average daily 
deficiency varied from 9° for the northeastern to 15° for the 
western section. The temperature averaged 7.8° below the 
normal January temperature. The mean temperature for 
the five coldest months of the past twenty-four years are as 
follows: January, 1886, 9.9°; January, 1888,10.6°; Janu- 
ary, 1881, 10.8°; 'January, 1883, 11.2°; 'February, 1899, 12.1°. 
Most of the extremely cold weather occurred during the first 
two weeks of the month, during which period the minimum 
temperature was below zero on nearly every day in all parts 
of the State. The lowest temperatures of the period were 
recorded on the 11th and 12th, when the minimum tempera- 
tures were generally more than 80° below zero, and at a few 
western stations more than 40° below zero. At nearly every 
station t he minimum temperature of this period was the low- 
est recorded in February since the commencement of record. 
The 11th was the coldest day of the month, the maximum 
temperature being below zero at nearly every station, and 
from 10° to 20° below zero at many stations. Little farm 
work was possible during this severe weather, and it is too 
early to estimate damage, if any, to fruit and fall-sown grain. 

Atmospheric pressure: The mean pressure was 80.20 inches, 
which is 0.10 of an inch above the normal for February. 
The highest during the month was 81.12 inches, at North 
Platte on the 11th, and the lowest, 29.57 inches, at Omaha 
and Lincoln on the 25th. 

Temperature: The mean temperature for the State, as de- 
termined from the records of 99 stations, was 12.1°, which 
is about 12.2° below the average of the past twenty-four 
years. The highest temperature was 74°, at Tecumseh on 
the 20th, and the lowest, 47° below zero, at Camp Clarke on 
the 12th. The mean daily range of temperature, as com- 
puted from the records of 54 stations, was 24.6°. The great- 
est range at any station was 58°, at Kennedy on the 27th. 

Wind: The prevailing direction of the wind was from the 
northwest. The average velocity was 8.8 miles an hour, 
which is a little above the normal. The highest velocity was 
42 miles an hour, at Lincoln on the 22d, from the north. 

Precipitation: The average precipitation for the State, as 
determined from the records of 138 stations, was 0.61 of an 
inch, which is 0.06 below the average of the past twenty- 
four years. The largest precipitation reported at anyone 
station was 1.60 inches, at Superior, and the least, trace, at 
Haigler and Loup. 

Siiiiirfall : The average snowfall (in inches) for the several 
sections was as follows: Southeastern, 9.0; northeastern, 



6.3; central, 6.4; southwestern, 5.6; western, 5.2; northwest- 
ern, 5.0; average snowfall for the State, 6.2. 

Halos: Solar halos were observed on the 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th, 
11th, 14th, 17th, 18th, 23d, and 28th and lunar halos on the 
2d, 6th, 7th, 9th, 20th, and 25th. 

Mirage: Mirage was observed on the 5th, 6th, and 15th. 

Auroras: Auroras were observed on the 11th. 

Wind and humidity table. 



Stations. 



Lincoln 

North IMatte. 
Omaha 



Wind. 



Miles. Mean. Max. Dtr. Date 



7,922 
6,345 
5,608 



11. 8 
9-4 
8-3 



Humidity. 



75-2 
69.7 
71.2 



Low- 



Means for the six equal sections of the State. 



Southeastern . 
Northeastern.. 

Central 

Southwestern 

Western 

Northwestern 



State. 



Temperature. 


Precipitation. 


Number of days- 


Mean. 


Aver- 
age.* 


Mean. 


Aver- 
age. 1 


Rainy. 


Clear. 


Partly 

cloudy. 


14-5 


24.2 


0.86 


0.84 


3-5 


13-2 


7.8 


II. 4 


20.4 


0.66 


0.76 


3-7 


12.8 


II. 4 


12.8 


21.4 


0.62 


o.73 


3-' 


15, 1 


7-9 


■4-3 


25-3 


°-59 


0.74 


3-o 


12. 1 


10.9 


IO. 1 


25.0 


0.46 


0.58 


3-6 


13-' 


9.6 


9-3 


21.4 


0.47 


0.64 


4-8 


11. 8 


10.5 


12. 1 


23.0 


0.61 


0.72 


3-6 


i3-o 


9-7 



Cloudy. 



7-o 
3-8 
5-° 
5- 1 
5-3 
5-7 



* For ten years. t For twenty years. 

Supplemental precipitation table. 



Stations. 



Bartley 

Bassett 

Bellevue 

Benedict 

Bradshaw 

Burchard 

Burwell 

Chester 

Clatonia 

Cody 

Culbertson 

Pannebrog 

Eden 

Elba 

Ewing 

Fairfield 

Fairmont 

Gordon 

Greeley 

Hayes Center. . 

Hickman 

Hooper 

Johnstown 

Lyons 

McCool Junct. 

Marquette 

Merriman 

Monroe 

Nemaha 

Odell 

Osceola 

Ough 

Palmer 

Palmyra 

Paxton 

! Plattsmouth . . . 

Pleasanthill ... 

! St.Libory 

I Salem 

1 Sargent 

Schuyler 

Sioux City, Iowa 

Spragg 

State Farm 

Stockham 

Strang 

Stratton 

Syracuse 

Tahlerock 

Valparaiso 

Wallace 

Wauneta 

Wellfleet 

Wilber 

Willard 

Wisner 

Yankton, S. Dak 



Counties. 



Red Willow 

Kock 

Sarpv 

York 

York 

Pawnee — 

Garfield 

Thayer 

Gage 

Cherry 

Hitchcock . 
Howard . . . 
Nemaha . .. 
Howard — 

Holt 

Clay 

Fillmore .. . 
Sheridan . . . 
Greeley — 

Hayes 

Lancaster . 

Dodge 

Brown 

Burt 

York 

Hamilton .. 

Cherry 

Platte 

Nemaha . .. 

Gage 

Polk 

Dundy 

Merrick 

Otoe 

Keith 

Cass 

Saline 

Howard . 
Richardson 

Custer 

Colfax 



Kock 

Lancaster. . 
Hamilton . 
Fillmore . . . 
Hitchcock . 

Otoe 

Pawnee 

Saunders.. . 

Lincoln 

Chase 

Lincoln — 

Saline 

Lincoln 

Cuming 



Length 
of rec- 
ord , y rs 



Total. 



0.07 
0.40 
0.43 

I. IO 

1.05 

I. 10 

0.60 
1. 17 

1. 10 

0. 20 
I.07 



O.85 
O.60 



O.70 
O.78 



O.69 

"•75 
0-35 
0.30 



0.70 
0.80 
0.96 
0.60 
o-75 
°-57 
0.60 

0-45 
0.85 
0.60 
0.85 



0.45 

0. S2 
O.80 
O.65 
0.90 
1.40 
O.36 

o. 50 

O.9O 

0.53 
O.SO 

o-95 
0.92 
0.65 
0.07 
0.62 
0.36 



Depart- 
ure from 
normal 



-0.24 
-0.90 



+0.28 

0.00 

+0.32 



+0.52 



— o-37 
—0.13 
+0. 18 
+0-54 
— o. 05 



— 0.07 
— 0.20 



+ 0. 12 
+0.31 
-0.38 



—0.30 
— o. 27 
+0.48 
+ 0.03 
— 0.02 
+0.04 



— o. 45 



+ 0.04 
—0.31 



-0.09 
-0.04 



—0-39 
+ 0. 15 
+0.50 
+0.13 
— o.5» 
—0.34 



+0.24 



-o, 13 
-0.41 



No. 
rainy 
days. 



Observers. 



R.S.Baker. 
A. H. Gale. 
E.F.Stouffer. 
R. B. Brabham. 
E.C.Roggy. 
J. A.Kinsey. 
W.S.Green. 
W.J.Kissick. 
F.W.Jones. 
W.E. Pontius. 
Mrs.L.A. Wibley. 
VV. J.Melson. 
D.J.Wood. 
S.M.Wellman. 
G. II. Benson. 
M. I.. Jones. 
(J. II. Borden. 
Amos Burwell. 
J.A.Pinkerton. 
R.C.Orr. 
O.O.Franklin. 
T. VV. Lyman. 
F.Avery. 
N.K. Kellam. 
F.E.Porter. 
John Ellis. 

F. Hussong. 
Win. Webster. 
K.J. Duff. 
LB. Huffman. 

G. W.Murbarger. 
Wm.Ough. 
E.H.Smith. 
W.D.Bancroft. 
Frank N. Pearl. 
W.Z.Pickett. 

J. W. Ingles. 

W.I.Meader. 

W.W.McDermet. 

J.S.Spooner. 

L.N.Dickinson. 

Weather Bureau. 

S.W. Spragg. 

S.W.Perin. 

J.W.Gray. 

S.Diller. 

C.W.Shurtliff. 

L. Howell. 

S.H.Dopp. 

W.J. (ra vcn. 

H.S.Toogood. 

J.W.IIaim. 

Wm.G. Hawkins. 

S.E.Davis. 

Wesley W. Lewis. 

Geo. W.Howe. 

Weather Bureau. 



February, 1899. 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



Climatological data for Nebraska, February, 1899. 



NORTHEASTERN SEC. 

Agee * 

Blair 

Columbus 

Creighton 

Fremont 

Harrington 

Lynch* 

Madison 

Norfolk 

Oakdale 

Omaha 

O'Neill 

Sautee Agency 

Stanton* 

Tvkamah 

Wakefield 

Westpoint 

SOUTHEASTERN SEC. 

Arborville* 

Ashland 

Auburn * 

Aurora* 

Beatrice 

Crete 

David City 

Dawson * 

Edgar* 

Fairbury : 

Geneva 

Harvard 

Hebron 

Lincoln 

Nebraska City 

Rulo* 

Seward * 

Superior* 

Tecumseh 

Turlington 

Weepingwater * 

\V y more * 

York* 

Central Sec 

Albion 

Ansley 

Ashton* 

Brokenbow* 

Callaway 

Central City * 

Dunning* 

Ericson * 

Genoa 

Gothenburg 

Grand Island 

Kearney * 

Lexington 

Loup* 

North Loup 

Ord * 

Ravenna 

St. Paul* 

Southwestern Sec. 

Alma 

Arapahoe * 

Beaver City 

Benkelman* 

Bluehill* 

Curtis 

Franklin 

Haigler * 

Hastings* 

Holdrege* 

imperial 

McCook* 

Madrid* 

Minden 

Redcloud* 

Republican * 

Wilsonville 

Western Sec. 

Camp Clarke 

(iering 

Kimball 

Lodgepole 

Nesbit 

North Platte 

Seneca* 

Thedford * 

Whitman * 

Northwestern Sec. 

Alliance * 

Fort Robinson 

Hay Springs 

Kennedy. '. 

Kirk wood * 

Springview 

Valentine 



Counties. 



Holt 

Washington. 

Platte 

Knox 

Dodge 

Cedar 

Boyd 

Madison 

....do 

Antelope — 

Douglas 

Holt 

Knox 

Stanton 

Burt 

Dixon 

Cuming 



York 

Saunders — 

Nemaiia 

Hamilton ... 

Gage 

Saline 

Butler 

Richardson . 

Clay 

Jefferson 

Fillmore 

Clay 

Thayer 

Lancaster.. . 

Otoe 

Richardson . 

Seward 

Nuckolls 

Johnson 

Otoe 

Cass 

Gage 

York 



Boone — 
Custer . . . 
Sherman . 
Custer . . . 

...do 

Merrick . . 
Blaine — 
Wheeler.. 
Platte.... 
Dawson . . 

Hall 

Buffalo... 
Dawson . . 
Sherman . 
Valley ... 

...do 

Buffalo... 
Howard . . 



Harlan 

Furnas 

...do 

Dundy 

Webster 

Frontier 

Franklin 

Dundy 

Adams 

Phelps 

Chase 

Red Willow. 

Perkins 

Kearney 

Webster 

Harlan 

Furnas 



Cheyenne •■• 
Scotts Bluff. 

Kimball 

Cheyenne ... 

Logan 

Lincoln 

Thomas 

....do 

Grant 



Box Butte .. 

Dawes 

Sheridan 

Cherry 

Rock 

Keya Paha . . 
Cherry 



442 
600 
203 
3<-9 



472 
060 
387 
313 



,051 

1 792 
1 235 
,368 
619 
945 
722 
3i6 
633 
,812 
,458 
199 
941 
842 
435 
574 
i"3 
214 
080 
222 
,642 

1.747 
2,3°7 
2,061 
2,477 
2,555 
1, 70S 
2,621 
2,029 
1,584 
2,557 
1,860 
2,146 
2,385 
2,067 
1,961 



2,028 
1,796 

1,939 
2,173 
2,147 
2,968 
1,967 
2,553 
1,820 
3, 2 56 
1,932 
2,324 
3,278 
2,506 
3,294 
2, 169 
1,687 
1,939 
2,298 



4,697 
3,820 



Temperature, in degrees Fahrenheit. 



fci u 

o 



2,841 

2,971 
2,842 

3,588 

3,968 
3,764 
3,821 



2,6:3 



4-9 

4-9 

S.I 
7-4 
11. 4 
n. 7 
10.4 
13-1 
9.0 



10.4 

8.5 
9.8 
8.4 
10.6 
9-1 
9-4 
9.6 



-10.3 



-10. o 
- 9-2 

- 8.4 

-10.2 
-10.5 



-II. 2 
-IO.9 
-IO.3 

- 9-1 

-6.7 
-8.5 

- 9-4 



-9.? 
-10.5 
-10.3 

- 8.8 

- 9-9 
-7.8 



-10. 2 
- 9-3 
-11. 8 
-9.3 
-7.6 
-II. 4 
-11. 9 
-10.6 
-10.4 
-8.7 
-10.7 



-11-5 
-'5' 



11. 4 
9-7 



-10.2 
- 9-9 

-12.8 
-13-3 



-36 
-to 

-41 ! 
-35 
-33 
-30 

-37 



Precipitation, in inches. 



49 



u 

c o 



I 



0.13 

°-39 
0.72 

0.53 
0.81 
1.40 
0.38 
o-75 
0-95 
o.47 
0.71 

0-13 

°-95 
°-75 
0.86 
0.S7 
0-59 

0.58 
0.80 
1.08 
o-75 
0.85 
0.98 

o-75 
0.82 
1.20 
0.50 

1.45 
1.05 
1.29 
0.56 
0.98 
0.50 
1.20 
1.60 
0.60 
o.93 
0.91 
1. 10 
0.50 

1. 10 
0.85 
0.36 
0.22 
0-55 
0-75 



0.60 
0.78 
1. 00 
0.68 
0.60 
1-25 
T. 
0.50 

0.33 

0.S9 
0.56 

0.41 
0.60 
0.32 
0.40 
0.80 
0.30 
o-75 
T. 
1.25 
0.30 
0.92 
0.40 
0.60 
0.9S 
0.90 
0.30 
0.40 

0.80 

1.04 
0.50 
0.70 
0-35 
0.36 
0.20 
0.28 
0.20 

°- 55 
0.56 
0.50 



11 I 0.75 
o.4( 
0.25 
0-45 



a 

»| 
Z a 



—0.44 



+0.19 
— 0.09 
—0.13 
+0.58 
+0.05 
+0.13 
+0.20 
— 0.12 
—0.08 
—0-34 
+0.29 
+0.16 
+0.01 
+o-39 
— 0.06 

— o. 10 
+0. 14 
—0.15 
+0.02 
— 0.09 
+0.18 
+0.04 
— 0.24 

+0.49 
— 0.24 
+0.20 
+0.18 
+0.64 
—0-37 
0.00 
+0.30 
—0.38 
+ 0.86 
— 0.62 
+ 0.03 
+ 0.03 



— 0.24 

+0.42 
+0. 10 
—0.05 

0.00 
+0.07 

0.00 



—0.05 

0.00 

+0.21 

— 0.02 

— °-39 
+ 0.32 
— 0.29 
+ 0.06 
+ 0.06 
+ 0. ot 
+ 0.09 



+ 0. 11 

— O. 12 
— 0.01 
+ O.23 
— 0.21 
— O.27 

—0.43 
+ O.I9 
— O.4O 
+ 0.27 
— O. 14 
+ 0.03 
— 0.10 

+0.40 

— 0.09 

+ 0.02 



+ 0.60 
— 0.07 
+ O.I9 
+ O.I9 
— O.06 

— o. 07 

—0.24 
— 0. II 

+0.19 

+ 0.02 

— o. 19 

+0.07 

— 0.10 

—0.13 
—0.25 



o. 10 
0.30 
o-57 
°-53 
0.60 

0-95 
0.20 
0.60 

0-35 

0.41 
0.46 
o. 10 
0.30 
0.60 
0.50 
0.40 
o.54 

0.40 
0.40 

0-55 
0.40 
0.40 
0.65 
0.60 
0.42 
0.65 
0.50 
0.65 
o.45 
0.70 
0.25 
0.60 
0.30 
1. 00 
0.70 
0.40 

0.55 
0.60 
0.50 
0:50 

0.60 
0.50 
0.20 

0-15 

0.4 

0.60 



0.30 
0.60 
o. so 

0.38 

0.40 
0.40 
T. 
0.30 
0.20 
0.50 

O. |0 

0.30 

0.40 
o. 17 
0.20 
0.60 
0.30 
0.40 
T. 
0.60 
0.20 
0.60 
0.30 
0.40 
0.50 
0.60 
0.25 
0.20 

0.20 

o.55 
0.20 

0.20 
0.20 
0.20 
0. 10 

0.15 

o. 20 

0.25 
0.30 
0.25 

0.20 
0.20 
O.25 
0.21 



4-5 
8.2 



7-5 
14.0 
3-8 
7-5 
9-5 
4-7 



1.3 
9-5 

7-5 
8.0 

8.7 
6.3 

6.0 
8.0 
8.8 
7-5 
8.5 
9.6 
7-5 
9-4 
12.0 
6.0 
14-5 
"•5 
11. 5 
6.8 



5.o 
12.0 
16.0 
6.0 
9.0 
8.0 
10. o 
5-0 

II. o 

8.5 

3-5 
2.2 

5-5 
7-5 



6.0 

7-9 
10. o 
6.8 
6.0 

■2-5 
T. 
5-0 
3-o 
8.9 
5-2 

4-1 
6.0 

3-5 
4.0 

8.0 
3-0 
7-5 
T. 

12.5 
3-o 
9-2 
4.0 
6.0 

11. o 
9.0 

3-o 
4.0 

8.0 
10.2 

5° 

7.0 

5-o 



2.0 

2.8 
2.0 

5-5 
5.6 
4-5 
7-5 
4-5 
2.5 



s 



Sky. 



6 



It 

s! 



9 


5 


3 


4 


7 


5 


16 


4 


13 


6 


12 


3 


'9 


3 


5 


2 


■5 


4 


9 


2 


9 


2 






nw. 
nw. 
nw. 



nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

n. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

n. 

nw. 

nw. 

n. 

nw. 

nw. 

n. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 



n. 

nw. 
nw. 
nw. 



nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

n. 

nw. 



nw. 

nw. 

ne. 

nw. 

nw. 

n. 

s. 

nw. 

ne. 

nw. 

sw. 

nw. 

nw. 



nw. 
nw. 
nw. 
sw. 
sw. 



n. 

nw. 

nw. 



nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

n. 

nw. 

nw. 



nw. 

nw. 
nw. 
nw. 
nw. 
nw. 
nw. 
nw. 
nw. 
nw. 

nw. 

w. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 



Observers. 



R.E.Bowden. 

E. A. Palmer. 
C.C.Gray. 

Dr. Geo . Roberts. 

Wm. J. Phillips. 

T. B.A.Watson. 

C.C.Irwin. 

Dr. F.A.Long. 

Dr. P. H.Salter. 

G.S.Clingman. 

U. S. Weather Bureau. 

Chas. N.Cole. 

W.H.Hamlin. 

W.Gerecke. 

Dr. A. D. Nesbit. 

I . H . Weaver. 

C.J.Kadish. 

E.D.Smith. 

Dr.A.S. v Mansfelde. 

G.D.Carrington. 

H.C.Miller. 

C. Kellam. 

Doane College. 

E.B.Taylor. 

M.L.Libbee. 

L.L. Fuller. 

W.F.Cramb. 

F.M.Floiy. 

Dr. J. T.Fleming. 

Dr.C.M.Easton. 

LT. S. Weather Bureau. 

E.Morton. 

W.F.Gingrich. 

L.E.Ost. 

L.W.Hahn. 

CM. Miller. 

Wm.N. Hunter. 

G. Treat. 

H.B.Ware. 

O.P.Lowry. 

F.A.Pettinger. 
Chas. R. Hare. 

F. Rein. 
H.L.Ormsby. 
Geo.B.Mair. 
J.A.McRae. 
L.L.Williams. 
A.Dahl. 

Geo. S.Truman. 
A.Y.Carlson. 
E.Corbin. 
C.E. Magner. 
Ira P.Griswold. 
E.S.Hayhurst. 
J.E.Goodrich, 
.las. Milford. 
Erastus Smith. 
Paul Anderson. 

R.E. Pitcher. 
J F.Edwards. 
C.O.George. 
W.F. Winger. 
C.S. Draper. 
Dr. S.R. Razee. 
F.T.Owen. 
T.P.F. Haine. 
J.C.Swarts. 

C. Engstroin. 
Robert Malcolm. 
C.T. Watson. 
John McKenzie. 
Joel Hull. 
D.F.Trunkey. 
W.Burdon. 

D. F. Hostetter. 

Robt. 11. Willis. 

J. P. F'inlev. 

F.J. Bellows. 

A.B.Persinger. 

G.E.Bolkcom. 

U. S. Weather Bureau. 

F.D.Gallup. 

B.A.Darrow. 

D.McNall. 

J.Kridelbaugh. 
Post surgeon. 
C. A. Waterman. 
D.A.Piercy. 
Mrs.C.A.Arter. 
Miss Ezada Phelps. 
U.S. Weather Bureau. 



* Temperature data from thermometers not self registering. t Occurred on more than one day. a , '', c , etc., indicate number of days missing from observed readings. 
All records are used in determining State or district means, but State and district departures are determined by comparison of current data of only stations with normals. 



1 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



February, 1899. 



33 g »!W 



v£5 <"0 O f*> O 
O t^ M **} IT. 



*t N O C 1/3 



I f 



N — Q\ rO 

(N CO CH O 



SB- 



XI! IV 



C On •- *- O 
sO NO NsO N 



CM MM MM 



uiK 






fO O O- - 
n n to TT 



<N O <0* ON 



■xt*K I 



i if **■ tj- co co if . < 



UIJV 



« N tJ- if, — O ^ h if, ro N if)so O 



■xhk | 



oo so if. OvO irvo 



■n U !K 



xbuI 



On n on >f- 



uijV 



tMO« ao> CO OnvO no 



vOnO i 



•XBKi 



■uiK 

•xbkI 



00 CI NO I 



;aO N On "*-O0 nO 



■U!K 



.vO m\D 






NO f0O N C 



— ■"■ N if. O 00 



•x«K | 



•U|K 



^*- N 'J- On iO ■- N "- if) O no if. if . i 

co cm ci cm to t«j pi « m m o pi o < 



e8 

H 

P 

e 

ft 

ci 

as 
eS 

u 
P 

4> 

ft 

(4 
fi 

a 
« 
u 

3 

fc. 

O 

& 

e 



• x«K l 
uiK 



cOsO "0 CO On N "-< 0>nO O0 u" , — 



XBJV ! 



uiK 



lA- 1/ co to 



SB1V | 



■A U !K 



<OD r^ 0>00 NO OnnO N CM 



I-xbkI 



O-TI-OO vo to 00 if) 



uik 



CM cO CM co co 



x^K I 



■*cO if. N O if.NO i 



UIK 



IfjPI O *•- vOCOCO 



XBK 






OM^.NO * co On W) 



uik 



xbk 



OnnO 00 NnO 



uik 



•XBJV 



* a>ort- 



cc o o CO 



uiK 



coif, oncn n ncc nno 



XBIV 



OnnO O -<rNO 



■uik 



rvOGCNO VO if, OnnO 



•xbk 



On— N O pO CM NO CO if- 'OCC 



On OnnO *t N 

m co 0* nO O* 



— n cm n i/) 
6 <jl « d r0 



O O Ni 



- I--. - lf,vO 

, O .-." CO ■* 



ifj M PQ t if; 

f i i i 6 



to tj-no nso 

h* 4 N -I ro 



OoO NO CM if) 



N 00 I 
"h if. if, — oo 



CM CM CM N CN N W (S (N N 



vo no r- po « 

NO* On ■*-00* if. 



if -n-NO NO nO 

NO CO *- no «*■ 
N N PI N Pi 



if j O On if , Tf 

«0 ■* -t" N CM* 

PI CM CM CM CM 



PJ « O 1 ^J" O 



PI PI PI PI N 



O O CO O 



I N rO -• if) NO coc© PI — no ««fr -»-00 if; 



— r-0 ^ if. On O N 



CO I »h CM 



COCO O CM O 



: ^ n cm 

)>trtin 



N NPI *0 CO On O OO co if,00 On — if) PI OnnO O fO CO tONO O 00 O N ( 
W »*)fl WW _ ^ POPQ ^^l - *t *f> CM «+ CO +PI npi ■* fi -»• r-o PM "*■ m ■*■ m «-, ' 

if. if. 3. if. PO ^O t^, On N On -*nO n)OMf) 0C" , M^^-ifi OCN — OCM if) O ^- ifj C 



;t_-W'- •*0'<*--cni cc o **-oo o f/H)f.ooo oo i 



OnnO O O ii 



I If . CM Pi 



t0 NO P4 l-~ fO 



- NO P0NO W- IOnO 



NO «0 On PI «f j NO ' 



00 - no tM 



if i On M I^.nO 



1^- t^.00 o o 



OCO*0 [nO 



OoOOO 00 OO t\N 



hrtO Oh On povO CO N r^ONONlfJto OOOOOtOO t^. O-nO CM fO O if, if. *f. > 



•*00 O O O CM O no c 



On — 0C r>.ON OnCNQC' 



) On "»- 1^. O to O I^CC NO CCNO NO nOOn On00 ' 



fO OnO -^J-OO 



r-N ON" * 



CO NO On On N 



to if. o to if) ■ r-» onoc cm oo 



On CM CjC 00 >0 



- tj-cc ifi r-oo on m if) 



h NO IC OOCNCC' 



— tooo ■* c 



Oco NO> 



On On tO — N 



if - r-» fN O On 



I NO PI (OnO »-t O I 



fOtOfOOrO If, NO ^J-nO 



4vOcOO N Pn'nO fO lO—rOI 



tO - r- if. - NPInO tC* ^qO nO CO On O - if-NO 



On CM CO Ifj N 



CO OCO PI N OO CM N00 On 



tO if.NO NO f. Ij 



co to to to rO 



- i^no if. — to n if^ co 



m NO On CM nO On u". ^00 



NO tO If) W I 



O to O- On if i 



tO OnnO if. CO 



> NO If. NsO NO 1 



> NQ SQ NQ -Q SO ' 



NO N On to 



r^Hifl NN 



On — nO ft «f) 



fOVO 00 On Ij 






-N. CsO On nO 



^so if) r- 1-^ On -*so 00 CO Os — no if.so 



l--- fj WO «0 CO 



NO p.p.POi' 



O O m if. o 



to 00 00 



NCO f, • 

IfW ~t Tf ■ 

CM so sc n if. 



■>J-00 if.so to 00 OnnO N 



ro ■* N tooo 



■> so if ,00 no •>*-'«*- to «*■ 



oo if,*0 ■*■ r*co — so ' 



PO00 POvO t— 00 



1 00 — NO Ifj ^NO 



N if.NO if) On ' 



O NO CC NO so 



ONO OnnO rOOro COCMCO'-if) 



NO 0XN 00 



On -<h PON 



nO—OOOOn OnOOO— NO-^TtOOC 
m ►Hpiro m i-i m ipiipii-i 



- 00 Tt t^ On 



to o to CO PO o o ■ 



CO to tO **- C 



N>0 00 •-* « O if) < 



M so NOO so CO c 



OOCMOOO NO PICO fJP 



TO ci - n. i 



rosO rr O sO 



if ; ^ u", O 
I IV 



CO CO tJ- O 00 



'CO O ONO 0\if,0 noncOmn OnO«NCO 



toao cc o cm co f 



OCC—O cou*jOO , nO t O OnmO f if.' 



On if- N CM 00 



•O if.NO cs ac 



i PO IflOO co if)if)if,lf)fO fO•-■CC , 



* oo if) ■«?- r^. 



if.NO Or-tO cO — OCON. ^J-NCOOCM CO if, t^OZ CC r^CO X Nif, 




c 

X 



05 

tx. 






O 
05 



< 
Eh 

O 




73 




inns 

Di 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



February, 1809. 



Daily precipitation for Nebraska, February, 1899. 



Stations. 


Day of month. 




i. 


2. 


3- 

t 


4. 


5- 


6. 


7- 


8. 


9- 


10. 
t 


11. 


12. 


>3- 


14. 


■5- 


16. 


17. 


18. 


>9- 


20. 


21. 

.01 
.20 


22. 

.02 


23- 


24. 


25- 


26. 

. 10 


27. 
+ 


28. 

+ 


29- 


3°- 


31- 


'o 




°->3 


Obion 
















. 10 
. 10 
.01 
























.60 
.10 


.20 










T 


•25 












. 10 


t 
•30 

.18 
.20 
.20 

•3° 

.07 
t 
.40 

•>7 


















t 








t 








°-55 
0.41 

o.«S 
0.58 




.05 

t 

t 

.02 
•05 




















t 










•t° 5 

t 
. IO 


•1 


•5° 
.40 
.40 
.20 
.40 

t 
. 10 

.40 
• 05 

.10 
.20 


























t 
















t 


t 










t 










t 








t 
•°3 


.20 
•35 


































•°3 






















1.08 














t 












































































0.07 


Baasett 




t 

•°5 


.10 












t 














+ 








•05 


•'5 






t 




t 










































0.85 
0.32 




■°5 












t 
























•«5 
. 10 

"t 


• 03 

.02 
































.20 

.04 
























t 
t 


t 
t 


.02 


t 












t 

.60 
•°5 
•3° 
.10 
.40 
.10 
.06 




















t 


■30 


t 










o.39 








t 


t 
t 


t 










t 




















+ 




























■15 
.80 
.20 






































































•3° 

.... 

.02 




























































t 
. 10 






,..-. 




t 
. 10 


..„ 
























t 
. 10 




t 


•15 
.10 
















. 10 

t 




















.20 

.01 




t 


t 


t 


















t 














t 


• 03 


• 03 








0.72 
0-53 
0.98 
1.07 




































•53 












t 


t 
.02 


t 










.10 


.20 
























•03 
•05 

t 

•°5 
t 


• 03 




•65 

.40 
+ 
.60 

• 42 






















.60 




















































•3D 






































. 10 














t 












t 
t 






























.02 












•'3 


.02 


















t 


.20 












0.82 






















































.20 














•65 

. IO 

•5° 
.02 

.40 
. IO 
.65 
.09 
.20 








t 
















t 
t 








•50 






























t 








■ 30 












0.60 




















































•°5 


.01 


+ 

•05 
.10 








.01 


.02 


.08 


















.01 


.02 








•30 
.07 


.02 

.60 
.60 
.60 

•3° 
.38 


•"5 


.02 




















.20 




















• 05 


'•_ 




















.06 




t 

. 10 
■°5 
.20 

t 
.08 

t 












0.81 






















































.04 

t 

.20 






































t 


t 








0.78 
I.04 




t 


* 








.01 


.01 
t 
.01 


t 
•5° 

t 




















■55 


"+ 

t 












































t 


.03 










.18 


































68 




t 








+ 
















t 




.10 


. 10 


















































t 
•'5 










f 








• 05 

.20 
.04 


.05 












t 
.20 
























.10 

■°5 


. IO 




■95 
• 45 
■3° 
















t 

.01 










+ 

t 




•35 
.60 










t 










t 
































. 10 
































































! 


•°5 
•05 












t 


..0 


. 10 
■70 
.20 
.60 
.20 
.IO 
.20 
.40 

•09 
.20 

t 

t 
.02 
•°5 








t 








t 


t 






t 

t 




•25 


t 

•51 
.IO 






+ 
































• 03 




































































t 


. 10 
t 

.02 












t 
t 


"t 
























.20 


"t 

t 


.02 

.IO 
.20 

"t 
















































.40 
•25 


.40 
.05 


















.05 




























t 




.10 

■ 05 
.20 
.01 
t 


"t" 


.10 












.05 




























•°5 




.20 
t 
.20 
































t 


t 
.20 


.02 

t 
.02 
•°5 




















t 






t 


t 


•19 












0.56 










.10 


















+ 


































t 
.20 












t 




f 


t 




































• °3 

t 
•°5 






.10 
.62 




t 




















.40 






t 












































. 10 




.60 












'ZZ 


Madrid .. 




























.10 












.20 
.01 
.06 


.10 
.06 

+ 










t 










t 














t 
























+ 
•05 








.01 


t 
.16 


•5° 






t 














.10 
.11 
.10 






•3° 


































t 












.60 


























.IO 
.20 
•°5 


























•5° 


















.15 








t 


t 


t 




































' 




t 


•°5 








•°5 


















t 
t 


t 
.20 


t 

.06 

.01 


t 
t 


.... 

•30 


.10 

t 
.04 
.41 


.70 
























































North Platte.. . 


t 




Od 


t 






t 


.02 


.20 

t 


t 


















t 

■3° 

.46 












0.36 

o.47 


Oakdale .. 


•°5 


























t 
























































t 




.02 














•05 
■°3 
.10 
.60 
■°5 






t 


t 












t 


t 
t 


.02 

+ 
.02 

t 

+ 

.07 
. 10 


.02 

. 10 




.14 
.10 

.80 
t 
.60 

•50 

.20 












0.71 




























t 














.04 
































































































t + 












. 10 
































































t 
t 
t 


t 








t 
t 


•35 
















t 




.01 










.01 




•3° 
.60 


































































































.20 














St Paul . . . 






.02 

•15 














. 12 

t 




















t 




.02 
■3° 






.40 
.20 


















































•25 
.40 




■05 
































































:; 

+ 
. 10 












. 10 




































t 












t 


t 











.20 






























t 
.20 


1. 00 


























.10 












.10 










.20 




•25 




. 10 






























































. 10 














■05 
•3<> 

■°5 
.c8 
•'5 
.18 
.02 
. 10 
•°3 
























t 




.60 


































.70 
.10 






















.60 
.40 
•50 










































•05 




































.10 






















t 






t 

t 

.OI 




.08 
• °5 
. 10 
.08 






.IO 












0.86 




t 












t 


t 


t 














t 




.08 
"t 








0.28 




t 

.21 


.07 
.02 


















■°3 
.01 










■55 
.10 


.40 
• 40 
.60 


"t 

.02 












t 












t 












t 






o.45 
0-53 
0.87 
0.91 
0-.S9 
















.01 














Wakefield .. 






.04 

t 
.02 
































t 
.... 

+ 
+ 


. 12 




.40 
• 54 












1 
t 


.... 












.16 










• °3 










t 
























•03 
.20 

•05 




























































t 








+ 












1 


































t 


•57 














York 






































•5° 















































































+ Trace (when precipitation is less than 0.01 of an inch). 



jf\ OF TH6 

UNIVERSITY of ILLINOIS. 

,3 



VA^ U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. 



REPORT FOR MARCH. 1899. 



NEBRASKA SECTION 



OF THE 



CLIMATE AND CROP SERVICE 



OF THE 



WEATHER BUREAU. 



PUBLISHED BY AUTHORITY OF THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE. 



UNDER DIRECTION OF 

WILLIS L. MOORE 

CHIEF OP WEATHER BUREAU 
BY 

G. A. LOVELiAMD, 

SECTION DIRECTOR, 

Office, University of Nebraska, Liincolp. 




Natural I- y Library 












05 

< 

Q 
55 



55 



> 

05 

Oh 

Q 
55 
< 

05 
&3 

K 

H 
O 
32 

i— i 

55 

< 
H 

S 



55 

o 







March, 1899. 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, 

Climate and Crop Service 



WEATHER BUREAU. 



CENTRAL OFFICE: WASHINGTON, D. C. 



NEBRASKA SECTION, 

G. A. LOVELAND, Section Director, 

LINCOLN, NEBR. 



Vol. IV. 



LINCOLN, NEBR. 



No. 3. 




PRECAUTIONS AGAINST CHINCH-BUGS. 

By Lawrence Bruner, 

Professor of Entomology, University of Nebraska. 

Owing to our rather severe winter which is now coming to 
a close, it is difficult to predict with certainty just what we 
may expect from this insect during spring and summer. 
Usually a steady, cold winter is more favor- 
able to hibernating insects than an open 
one. It will be well, therefore, for farmers 
living in sections of the State that were last 
year infected by chinch-bugs to take precau- 
tionary measures early in the season to pre- 
vent their increase and consequent injuries. 
This can be done by a general cleaning 
up and burning of weeds and other rubbish 
found lying loose about the premises. All 
weed patches in draws, nooks about gar- chinch-bug: Mature 
dens, edges of groves, fence corners, old 
pastures, along roadsides, hedges, streams, etc., as well as 
tracts of prairie grass, should be gone over and carefully 
burned before the hibernating insects forsake their winter 
retreats prior to their spring migrations and mating. 

Of course after having done this precautionary work ever 
so carefully there will remain many of the insects that will 
have escaped, and that will eventually find their way to the 
grain fields. This can not be helped. We must trust to 
Providence for the future after having done our part. If cli- 
matic conditions prove favorable, these bugs will be killed; 
but if not, they will increase to the greatest possible extent. 
Later, when small grain is harvested, pains should be 

taken so as to de- 
stroy as many of the 
young bugs as pos- 
sible while they are 
migrating from the 
stubble fields into 
the corn. We can 
do nothing more 
here at the Univer- 
sity than give advice 
as to best methods 
of warfare, since the legislature failed even to provide for 
postage, let alone other expenses that might arise during the 




same more advanced; 
', beak— all enlarged. 



young just hatched; e , f , 
s, pupa; '', d , J, legs of bug, 



year in connection with this and other insect pests. Where 
our farmers are really in earnest concerning the destruction 
of insect pests, and write to us for advice, their letters will 
be cheerfully answered. 



NOTES. 

The record of the temperature of the soil taken at the 
State Farm near Lincoln shows the ground frozen on the 
last day of the month at depths of 3 to 36 inches. The 
ground was frozen at depths of 6 to 36 inches during the 
entire month, and was frozen most of the time at a depth 
of 3 inches. At a depth of 1 inch the ground thawed out 
nearly every day. 

Attention has been called to the dry air of the rooms of 
the University buildings by the fact that plants require a 
great amount of water to grow well. During the last five 
days in March the relative humidity of the office was tested 
three to five times each day and compared with the relative 
humidity in the shelter. The rooms are heated by steam 
without any method of adding moisture to prevent excep- 
tional dryness. The average relative humidity in the shelter 
for the five days was 66.5 per cent. The relative humidity 
in the office room was quite regular, and generally between 
14 and 18 per cent, but occasionally rising slightly above 20 
per cent when the temperature of the room was low ; the 
highest noticed was 27 per cent early in the morning when 
the temperature of the room was only 54°. The room was 
well ventilated, but the relative humidity seems exception- 
ally low as indicated by these extremely few observations. 
The records will be continued to determine if they fairly 
represent the humidity of office rooms in Nebraska. 

With the exception of a very little wheat sown in the 
southwestern counties, there has been no progress made in 
plowing or seeding during the month. The ground has been 
frozen about all of the time, and was frozen on the last day 
of March. Neither grass, fall-sown grain, nor fruit buds have 
started to grow. Rye seems to have wintered fairly well 
and winter wheat has been damaged somewhat. However, 
no reliable estimate of the condition of either grain can be 
made until warm weather causes the live grain to grow. 



OBSERVERS' NOTES. 



Month hard on range stock, yet they are in fair condition; losses of 
natives small, but of imported very heavy. — F. J. Bellows, Kimball. 

Very little grain sown this month; loss in cattle very light. — W. G. 
Hawkins, Welltleet. 

Ice in the Missouri River did not break up until April 4, although 
it was unsafe for teams most of March. It usually breaks up the first 
week in March. — W. H. Hamlin, Santee Agency. 

Hay about all fed out in this section; loss of stock is a very small 
per cent so far. — A. B. Persinger, Lodgepole. . 



CLIMATOLOGY OF THE MONTH. 

General characteristics: The month was characterized by 
continued low, but rather even temperature, the maximum 
and minimum temperatures for the State being about the 
average, while the mean was the lowest recorded during the 
past twenty-four } r ears, except in 1876, when it was two- 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



March, 1899. 



tenths of a degree lower. Almost all the precipitation fell 
as snow in small daily amounts on a large number of days, 
many days with only a trace. 

Atmospheric prepare: The mean pressure was 30.08 inches, 
which is about the normal for March. The highest during 
the month was 30.00 inches, at North Platte on the 5th, and 
the lowest, 29.50 inches, at Lincoln on the 10th. 

Temperature: The mean temperature for the State, as de- 
termined from the records of 110 stations, was 20.8°, which 
is about 7.0° below the average of the past twenty-four years. 
The highest temperature was 82°, at Alma and Beaver City 
on the 8th, and the lowest, 15° below zero, at Kimball on 
the 26th. The mean daily range of temperature, as com- 
puted from the records of 54 stations, was 23.6°. The great- 
est range at any station was 63°, at Curtis on the 8th. 

Wind; The prevailing direction of the wind was from the 
northwest. The average velocity was 10.7 miles an hour, 
which is nearly 2.0 miles above the normal. The highest 
was 45 miles an hour, at Lincoln on the 5th, from the north. 

Precipitation: The average precipitation for the State, as 
determined from the records of 135 stations, was 0.92 of an 
inch, which is 0.23 below the average of the past twenty- 
four years. The largest precipitation reported at any one 
station was 3.40 inches, at Rulo and Bassett, and the least, 
trace, at Callaway. 

Snowfall: The average snowfall (in inches) for the several 
sections was as follows: Southeastern, 8.6; northeastern, 
4.9; central, 5.9; southwestern, 5.6; western, 8.3; northwest- 
ern, 15.2; average snowfall for the State, 8.1. 

Thunderstorms: Thunderstorms occurred on the 1st, 2d, 
11th, 14th, 17th, and 23d. 

Fog: Fog was observed on the 2d, 3d, 10th, 14th, and 17th. 

Halos: Halos were observed on the 5th, 10th, 19th, 22d, 
25th, 26th, 28th, and 30th. 

Sleet: Sleet fell on the 11th, 13th, 14th, 17th, and 20th. 

Birds: Robins, meadow larks, and blackbirds were noticed 
in various parts of the State on the 14th and later dates. 

Barometer, wind, and humidity table. 





Barometer. Wind. 


Humidity. 


Stations. 


V 


X 



■a 





DQ 


►J 


CS 


A 

> 




ft 

u ~ 
at 

< 


Maximum 
velocity. 


c 


C0 
0) 



►J 






QQ 

i 


6 

5 


A 
Q 


A 

3 

Q 


North Platte . 


30-05 
30.07 
30.05 
30.11 


30.58 
30.66 
30.56 
30.61 


6 

5 
6 

5 


29.50 

29.62 

29.52 

29.61 


10 
10 
10 
24 


1 o,445 
8.383 
7.536 


14.0 

11. 3 

10. 1 


45 
43 
30 


n. 

nw. 

nw. 


5 
14 
12 


75 
73 
78 


36 
30 
36 


6 

8 
28 





















Means for the six equal sections of the State. 








Temperature. 


Precipitation. 


Number of days— 


Sections. 


Mean. 


Aver- 
age.* 


Mean. 


Aver- 
aged 


Hainy. 


Clear. 


Partly 
cloudy. 


Cloudy. 


Southeastern 


29.0 
23.2 

27.4 
3'-' 
27.8 
22.4 

26.8 


35-9 
32.5 
32.7 
35-2 
33-5 
32.0 

33-6 


0.92 

0.78 
0.54 
0.88 
0.84 
1-55 
0.92 


I-5 2 
1-33 
1. 16 
0.91 
0.81 
1.22 

1.16 


5-o 
4-8 
2.3 
4-3 
4.8 
6.6 

4-6 


8.5 
8.8 
11. 

9-3 
12.0 
10.7 

10. 


11. 9 
12.9 
10. 
'3-7 
9.0 
10.5 
11. 3 


10.5 
9-3 


Southwestern 

Western 

State 


8.1 
10. 1 
9-8 
9.6 





: For ten years. 



t For twenty years. 



COMPARISON OF PAST MARCHES. 

The monthly maximum and minimum temperatures tor several sta- 
tions have been obtained for the years 1870 to 1888, and the following 
table has been revised, and differs slightly from the comparative tallies 
previously published : 



Years. 



1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
188 1 
1882 
1883 

|NS.| 
1885 
IHH6 
[887 
iRSS 



Temperature. 


Pre- 
cipita- 
tion. 








Mean. 


Max. 


Min. 


26.6 


66 


— 9 


1.85 


32.8 


74 


— 4 


0.76 


44.1 


80 


19 


1-95 


40. 1 


86 


3 


0.70 


32.8 


80 


— 21 


0.50 


3°-3 


Si 


— 10 


'•5' 


39-2 


77 


4 


0.15 


33-6 


75 


— 2 


0.50 


33-6 


73 


— 5 


1.96 


35-6 


70 


— 8 


0.46 


30.5 


73 


-15 


2.01 


37-8 


80 


—18 


0-39 


27.6 


80 


— 15 


2.13 


40.4 


76 


4 


1.06 



Years. 


Temperature. 


Mean. 


Max. 


Min. 


1890 

1891 

■892 

'893 

1894 

1895 

1896 

1897 

1898 

1899 

Average for 
the past. 24 
years 


34- 
26.9 
33-3 
3'. 6 
38.2 
35-9 
3"- 5 
34-2 
35-0 
26.8 

33-8 


75 
75 
82 
96 
88 
94 
90 
82 
81 
82 

80 


— 7 
-38 
—19 

—18 

— 9 
— 20 

—24 

— 14 

— 14 

— '5 

— 11 



Pre- 
cipita- 
tion. 



0.84 
1.86 
1.62 
1.32 

0.00 

0.72 
1.45 
1.49 
0.61 
0.92 



Climatological data— supplemental table. 



Sections and 
stations. 



Northeastern. 

Bellevue 

Ewing 

Hooper 

Hubbard 

Lyons 

Monroe 

Schuyler 

Sioux City, Iowa 

Wisner 

Yankton, S. Dak 
Southeastern. 

Benedict 

Bradshaw 

Burchard 

Chester 

Clatonia 

Eden 

Fairfield 

Fairmont 

Hickman 

McCool Janet... 

Marquette 

Nemaha 

Odell 

Osceola 

Palmyra 

Plattsmouth — 
Pleasanthill .... 

Salem 

State Farm 

Stockham 

Strang 

Syracuse 

Tablerock 

Valparaiso 

Wilber 

Central. 

Burwell 

Elba 

Greeley 

Palmer 

St. Libory 

Southwestern. 

Bartley 

Culbertson 

Hayes Center. . . 

Ough 

Sargent 

Stratton 

Wallace 

Wauneta 

Wellfieet 

Western. 

Paxton 

Willard 

Northwestern 

Bassett 

Cody 

Gordon 

Johnstown .... 

Merriman 

Spragg 



3) 0> 
3 C 






Precipitation, in 
inches. 



25-4 



22.0 
25.8 
20.7 



27.0 



26.6 
29.2 
31-0 
30.0 



29.6 
3>-2 



27.6 

28.3 
26.3 

3°-4 
29-5 



24.6 
30.8 



35-2 



33-8 



0.44 
1.38 
1.28 
0.50 
1-25 
0.70 
0.30 
0-55 
0-73 
0.91 

0.56 
0.15 



0.41 
0.91 
1.85 
0.32 
0.36 
0.70 
0.44 
0.27 

1-53 
0.96 
0.50 
0.80 
0.90 
2.03 

2-15 
0.52 
0.50 
0.90 

0-77 
2. 19 

0.77 
0.32 

0.05 
0.40 
0-35 



a 

o_: 



-0.66 
— 0.09 



+0. 13 



—0.65 
— 0.60 



-0.31 



— o. 29 



0.72 

o.45 
0.94 

i-33 
0.70 



0.90 
0.91 
1.90 

1-75 

1.66 



3-40 
o. 19 
1.40 



0.80 
0.61 



+o.°3 
-0.75 
—0-79 
—0.6S 
—0.78 
—0.74 
— 0.27 
—0.57 
—0.78 
+ o.35 
—0.81 



+ 0.79 
—0.71 



+ 0.01 
—0.98 
+ 1. 12 



—0.45 

— 0.96 
—0.33 
— o.c8 



-0-33 



-0.06 
-0.22 



Number of 
days— 



+ 1-43 



12 16 
4 



nw. 
nw. 



nw. 
nw. 



nw. 
n. 



nw. 

n w. 



nw. 
ne. 
nw. 
nw. 



n. 
nw. 
nw. 
nw. 

n. 

nw. 
sw. 
nw. 
nw. 
ne. 

n. 



nw. 
nw. 



Observers. 



E.F.Stouffer. 
(>. II. Benson. 
T. W. Lyman. 
M.M.Beacom. 
N.K. Kellain. 
Win. Webster. 
L. N.Dickinson. 
Weather Bureau, 
(ieo. W. Howe. 
Weather Bureau. 

R.B. Brabham. 

E.C.Roggy. 

J. A. Kinsey. 

W.J.Kissick. 

F. W.. Jones. 

D.J.Wood. 

M. L. Jones. 

6. H. Borden. 

O.O.Franklin. 

F.E.Porter. 

John Ellis. 

K.J. Duff. 

I.B.Huffman. 

U. W.Murbarger. 

W.D.Bancroft. 

W.Z. Pickett. 

J. W. Ingles. 

W.W.McDermet. 

S.W.Pcrin. 

J.W.Cray. 

S.Diller. 

L.Howell. 

S.lI.Dopp. 

W.J.Craven. 

S.E.Davis. 

W.S.Oreen. 
S.M.Wellman. 
J. A.Pinkerton. 
E.H.Smith. 
W.I.Meader. 

R.S.Baker. 
Mrs.L.A.VViblev. 
R.C'.Orr. 
Wm.Ough. 
.1. S.Spooner. 
C. W.Shuitliff. 
H. S.Toogood. 
J.W.Haim. 
Win.C. Hawkins. 

Frank N. Pearl. 
Wesley W. Lewis. 

A. II. Gale. 
W. E.Pontius. 
Amos Burwell. 
F.Avery. 
F. Ilussong. 
S.W. Spragg. 



II ■^T-».. l,JJ i 



March, 1899. 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



Climatological data for Nebraska, March, 1899. 



Northeastern Sec. 

Agee * 

Blair 

Columbus 

Oreighton 

Fremont 

Hartington 

Lynch* 

Madison 

Norfolk 

Oakdale 

Omaha 

O'Neill 

Santee Agency 

Stanton * 

Tekamah 

Wakefield 

Westpoint 

Southeastern Sec. 

Arborvilte* 

Ashland 

Auburn * 

Aurora* 

Beatrice 

Crete 

David City 

Dawson * 

Edgar* 

Fairbury 

Geneva 

Harvard 

Hebron 

Lincoln 

Nebraska City 

Kulo* 

Seward * 

Superior* 

Tecumseh 

Turlington 

Weepingwater * 

Wymore* 

York * 

Central Sec. 

Albion 

Ansley 

Ash ton* 

Broken bow* 

Callawav 

Central City* 

Dunning* 

Ericson * 

Genoa 

Gothenburg 

Grand Island 

Kearney * 

Lexington 

Loup* 

North Loup 

Old * 

Kavenna 

St. Paul* 

Southwestern Sec. 

Alina 

Arapahoe * 

Beaver City 

Benkelman* 

Bluehill* 

Curtis 

Franklin 

Haigler * 

Hastings* 

Holdrege * 

Imperial 

McCook* 

Madrid* 

Mind en 

Hedeloud* 

Republican* 

Wilsonville 

Westekn Sec. 

Camp Clarke 

tiering 

Kimball 

Lodgepole 

Nesbit 

North Platte 

Seneca* 

Thedford * 

Whitman* 

Northwestern Sec. 

Alliance * 

Fort Robinson 

Hay Springs 

Kennedy 

Kirkwood * 

Springview 

Valentine 



Counties. 



Holt 

Washington. 

Platte 

Knox 

Dodge 

Cedar 

Boyd 

Madison 

....do 

Antelope 

Douglas 

Holt 

Knox 

Stanton 

Burt 

Dixon 

Cuming 



York 

Saunders 

Nemaha 

Hamilton ... 

Gage 

Saline 

Butler 

Richardson . 

Clay 

Jefferson 

Fillmore 

Clay 

Thayer 

Lancaster.. . 

Otoe 

Richardson . 

Seward 

Nuckolls 

Johnson 

Otoe 

Cass 

(■age 

York 



Boone 

Custer 

Sherman 

Custer 

...do 

Merrick 

Blaine 

Wheeler 

Platte 

Dawson 

Hall 

Buffalo 

Dawson 

Sherman 

Valley 

...do 

Buffalo 

Howard 



Harlan 

Furnas 

...do 

Dundy 

Webster 

Frontier 

Franklin 

Dundy 

Adam's 

Phelps 

Chase 

Red Willow. 

Perkins 

Kearney 

Webster .... 

Harlan 

Furnas 



Cheyenne . . . 
Scotts Bluff 
Kimball .... 
Cheyenne ... 

Logan 

Lincoln 

Thomas 

...do 

Grant 



Box Butte . 

Dawes 

Sheridan . . . 

Cherry 

Rock 

Keya Paha . 
Cherry 



1,442 
1,600 
1,203 
1,309 



1,585 
i,53 2 
1,722 
1,103 
1,975 



1,472 
1,060 
1,387 
i,3'3 



1,100 
i,°5i 
1,792 
',235 
1,368 
1,619 

945 
1,722 

1,316 

1,633 
1,812 
1,458 
i,i99 
941 
842 
1,435 
1,574 
1,113 
1,214 
1,080 
1,222 
1,642 

1,747 
2,307 
2,u6i 

2,477 
2,555 
1,708 
2,621 
2,029 
1,584 
2, 557 
1,860 
2, 146 
2,385 
2,067 
1,961 



2,028 
1,796 

1,939 
2,i73 
2,M7 
2,968 
1,967 
2,553 
1,820 
3, 256 
1,932 
2,324 
3,278 
2,506 
3,294 
2, 169 
1.687 
1,939 
2,298 

3,70o 



4,697 
3,S2o 



2,8)1 

2,97' 

2,8(2 
3.588 

3,968 

3.70) 
3.821 



2,613 



Temperature, in degrees Fahrenheit. 



61 ^ 

c o 



21.7 

23-7 
25-9 
21.2 
26.0 
18.2 
22.2 
21.8 
22.2 
22.2 
26.8 
21.7 
21.6 
24.2 
25-4 
2"-5 
24.2 

29.8 
27.6 
3°-4 
28.6 
29.2 
27.4 
26.7 
31-9 
29.0' 
29.2 
29.0 
28.6 
30.0 
27.8 
29.0 
34-2 
27-3 
32.4 
30.0 
27.8 
25-3 
3'-3 
27.8 

26.0' 
26.4 
26.3 
28.9 
27.8 
23-5 
23.8 
22.5 
25-4 
31.6 
28.4 
31-0 
28.0 
26.1 
27.2 
24.8 
28.8 
28.0 

33-° 
3'- 8 
32.8 
32.4 
29.6 
3'-° 
32.0 
34-2 
27.4 
24.1 
31-8 
31-6 
27-4 
28.3 



a> 6 
3 2 



-8.3 



— 7-4 

— 8.2 

— 7-i 
—10.8 

— 7-9 



7.8 
8.7 
7-9 
9.2 

6.9 



3-3 
8.3 
6.4 
4-9 

5-8 
7-4 
3-9 



5-6 



6.7 
4-7 
6.3 
9-4 
7-2 
5-7 
9-1 
3-5 
6.6 
5-4 
7-8 



8.2 



- 6.1 

- 6.0 

-4.6 

- 5-1 
-10.6 

- 7.6 

- 8.4 

- 7-o 



4-3 
2.4 
7.6 



- 5-1 



5-2 
3-7 



31-8 
30.8 

29.8 
26.4 
29.2 
29- 5 
26.2 
27.6 
27.2 



6.1 
4-3 



5-7 
9-1 
3-1 
5-5 
6.3 
6-5 



5-6 



26.4 

24.0 
23-4 
20.5 
24.2 
20.6 
21. 1 
23.0 



4.2 
2.2 
3-1 
4-9 

7-4 



9-5 
8.9 
6.8 



9.6 
7-4 



58 



43 



Precipitation, in inches. 



Sot, 

c o 



1.02 

0.63 
0.81 
0.36 
0.87 

1-45 
o-59 
0.62 

o.54 
0.80 
0.64 
0.63 
1. 16 
0.69 
0.60 
0.83 
0.62 

0.35 
0.45 
2.21 
0.20 
1-34 
o.77 
0.45 
2.48 
0.64 
1.40 
1. 10 
0.96 
'•13 
0.70 
'■25 
3-40 
0.52 
1. 00 
0.50 
1. 61 
1.32 
i-54 
o. 10 

0.67 

°-55 
0.64 

°T 3 . 2 
o. 10 
0.20 
0.80 

o-59 
0.50 

0-99 
0.60 
1.40 
o.44 
0-74 
0-75 
0.90 
0.61 

0-73 
0.30 
0.60 
0.87 
0.70 
1. 16 
0.90 
0.52 
1.02 
0.20 
1.90 
0.60 

1. 10 

1 .11 
0-95 
0.15 
0.40 

1.40 
1.92 
0.68 
0.80 
0.90 
0.83 
o. 10 
0-35 
o.55 



1.76 
2-94 
2.27 
0.88 
0.81 






0.00 



— 0.22 
— 0.76 
— 0.91 

— 0.12 

—0.44 
—O.38 
— O.46 
— 0.27 

—0.86 
—0.74 
+0.12 
— 0.27 
—0.88 
— 0.22 
—0.83 

—0.84 
—0.89 
— o. 19 
—0.98 
— 0.24 
— 1.02 

— 1. 19 
+ 0.26 
— 0.27 
— 0.04 
+0.04 
— 0.14 
—0.47 
—0.67 
— 0.29 
— 1.46 
—0.86 
+0. 19 

— 1.28 
+0.17 
— 0.07 



— 1. 18 

— 0.29 

—0-75 
— 0.02 

—o.37 
—0.97 
— 1.06 
—0.31 
— 0.40 

—0-75 
— 0.06 
—0.30 
—0.29 
+0.18 
— o. 29 
—0.18 
— 0.09 
— 0- 45 
—0.35 



—0.13 
— 0.06 
+0.22 
— 0.05 
—0.08 
+0.01 
—0.31 
—0.28 
— 0.69 
+0.71 
+0. 05 
+0.13 
— o-35 
+o.37 
—o.34 
+0. 21 



+ 1.00 
— 0.26 
—0-43 
+ 0.31 
+ 0.08 
—0.72 
—0.45 
—0-44 

— 0.27 
+0.48 
+ 1.21 
+0.56 
—0-33 
— 0.25 
— o. 16 



0.40 
0.28 
0.47 
0.20 

0.45 
0.80 
0.52 
0.57 
0.28 
0.60 
0.36 
0.25 
0.51 
0.60 
0.30 
o.55 
0.32 

0.26 
0.40 
0.90 
0.20 
0.80 
0.45 
0.40 
1.00 
0.20 

o.75 
0.50 
0.40 
0-34 
0.46 
0.50 
1. 00 
0-35 
0.60 
0.20 
0.60 

o-95 
0.40 
o. 10 

°-57 
0.30 
0.54 
0.20 
T. 
0.05 
0.20 
0.60 
0.31 
0.50 
0.4.S 
0.60 
0.80 
0.41 
0.60 
o.75 
o.54 
o.47 

0.20 
0.20 
0.26 
0.40 
0.40 
0.70 
0.40 
0.50 

0-55 
0.20 
1. 00 
0.60 
0.80 
0.30 
0.35 
o. 10 
0.30 

0.30 
0.60 
0.30 
0.50 
0.70 
0.30 
o. 10 
0.10 

0.15 



0.40 
0.40 

1. 00 

0.60 

o-55 
0.40 
0.32 



fe-O 



3-7 
0.5 
3-o 
6.5 

13.2 
3-2 
2.0 
1. 1 
5-8 



6.3 
9-7 

4-7 
4.0 
8.4 
2.0 



7-5 
17.5 



6-5 

4-5 
17.5 
4.0 
9.0 
6.0 
6.6 
7.8 
6.2 
9.0 
15-0 
1.2 
8.0 
5-0 
12.6 
10.5 
9.0 



5-0 
5-6 
4.0 
4.2 
T. 
1.0 
2.0 
8.0 
2.5 
5-0 
6.4 
6.0 
14.0 



1-5 



8.4 
3-2 

4.2 
3-0 
2-5 
8-7 
4.0 

3-5 
8.0 
5-2 
7.2 
2.0 

12.0 
6.0 

10. o 
8.4 
6.0 
1-5 
3-0 

14.0 
19.2 

6-3 

8.0 
8.0 

7.8 
1.0 
5-0 
5-5 

7.0 
17.8 
30.8 
19.0 






Sky. 



g" « 



Observers. 



R.E.Bowden. 

E. A. Palmer. 

C.C.Gray. 

Dr. Geo. Roberts. 

Wm. J. Phillips. 

T.B. A. Watson. 

C.C.Irwin. 

Dr. F.A.Long. 

Dr. P. H.Salter. 

G.S.Clingman. 

U. S. Weather Bureau. 

Chas. N.Cole. 

W.H.Hamlin. 

W.Gerecke. 

Dr. A. D. Nesbit. 

I. H. Weaver. 

C.J.Kadish. 

E.D.Smith. 

Dr.A.S. v Mansfelde. 

G.D.C'arrington. 

H.C.Miller. 

A.C.Zimmerman. 

Doane College. 

E.B.Taylor. 

M.L.Libbee. 

J.W.Conner. 

W.F.Cramb. 

F.M.Flory. 

Dr. J. T.Fleming. 

Dr.C.M.Easton. 

U. S. Weather Bureau. 

E.Morton. 

W.F.Gingrich. 

L.E.Ost. 

L.W.Hahn. 

C.M.Miller. 

Wm.N. Hunter. 

G. Treat. 

H.B.Ware. 

O.P.Lowry. 

F.A.Pettinger. 

Chas. R. Hare. 

F.Rein. 

H. L.Ormsby. 

Geo.B.Mair. 

J.A.McRae. 

L. L. Williams. 

A.Dahl. 

Geo. S.Truman. 

A.V.Carlson. 

E.Corbin. 

0. E.Magner. 

Ira P.Griswold. 

E.S.Hayhurst. 

J.E.Goodrich. 

J as. Milford. 

Erastus Smith. 

Paul Anderson. 

R.E. Pitcher. 
J F.Edwards. 
C.G.George. 
W. F. Winger. 
C.S. Draper. 
Dr. S.R. Razee. 
F.T.Owen. 
T.P.F.Haine. 
J.C.Swarts. 

C. Engstrom. 
Robert Malcolm. 
C.T.Watson. 
John McKenzie. 
Joel Hull. 
Wm.S.Burdick. 
W.Burdon. 

D. F. Hostetter. 

Robt. II. Willis. 

J.P.Finley. 

F.J. Bellows. 

A.B.Persinger. 

Grant E.Bolkcom. 

U. S. Weather Bureau. 

F.D.Gallup. 

B. A.Darrow. 
D.McNall. 

J.Kridelbaugh. 
Post surgeon. 

C. A. Waterman. 
D.A.Piercy. 
Mrs.C. A. Arter. 
Miss Ezada Phelps. 
U.S. Weather Bureau. 



* Temperature data from thermometers not self registering. t Occurred on more than one day. \ '•, ", etc., indicate number of days missing from observed readings. 
All records are used in determining State or district means, but State and district departures are determined by comparison of current data of only stations with normals 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



March, 1899. 






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CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



March, 1899. 



Daily precipitation for Nebraska, March, 1899. 



stations. 


Day of month. 




i. 


2. 


3- 


4- 


5- 


6. 


7- 


8. 


9- 


10. 


1 1. 


12. 


'3- 


"4- 


15- 


16. 


■ 7- 


18. 


'9- 


20. 


21. 


22. 


23. 


24- 


25- 


26. 


27. 


28. 


29. 


3°- 


31- 


♦J 
O 








t 


t 


t 










•30 


t 




.08 


.40 


t 


.12 


. 10 






t 


.02 






t 








t 




+ 


t 


1.02 


























t 
.04 
















t 








t 

•19 
•3° 
.26 






















.20 
. 10 
.20 


.20 




.28 


.40 


.02 

t 
+ 
■03 

.40 


..„ 


0.88 
0-73 
0-55 
o-35 
0.45 
2.21 
0.20 
o-45 
3-40 
1-34 
























.08 
















. 10 














•05 
.09 
t 
.20 

t 








t 


t 


t 

t 

.40 
.90 


.02 




t 


t 
t 
t 

t 














t 
t 

t 

t 






























t 


t 


.20 

. 10 


1 






t 


t 




















t 








• 25 














.21 

t 

.26 
3.00 

t 
.26 

t 

.02 
. 12 
.20 


t 
.18 










■°5 








.10 
.20 

■14 


































t 










■ 05 












t 


.20 
.08 


.20 


.02 

t 


t 


t 
. 10 

t 
t 
t 
.08 
















t 


"t" 

t 


•°5 

•15 
















t 
• 07 

1' 

.02 

t 


t 










. 10 
t 










.05 






•05 
•3° 

t 
.40 
. 12 


. 10 
•15 
.40 


• 05 








• °5 


.04 


t 
t 
























t 










.02 

t 
t 


0.87 
0.63 










t 
t 
t 


.01 










.28 


.18 

t 


.04 






t 






























t 
t 


t 














t 














t 






t 














0.32 






































































•°5 




































0.05 


































































t 
t 


















.20 


.05 


.04 




■30 
.20 
.20 
. 12 
.21 
.70 

•°5 
. 12 


•47 
t 




.15 
.10 
. 10 

t 

+ 


t 




t 


t 


t 






■3° 


.20 








.20 

t 

t 

.12 
• 05 

t 














t 
















0.81 
0.36 


















.06 








t 












t 
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t 
"+ 












.02 










•45 












t 
.08 








■05 
.60 

•3° 




t 
. 11 




+ 




t 








t 










0.77 








t 






t 














•°5 


0.94 
1. 16 






















.40 
.40 
























+ 


.20 


.18 




■15 












I. CO 






.02 


t 








.04 








•17 


. 10 






•3" 




0-45 
2.48 


































. 12 
















.20 

.20 


• 05 
.60 














t 
t 








.20 


•°5 






.02 






0.64 
0.80 
























































































.65 
• 25 




















.01 




.02 








t 


■25 








• 3° 


. 10 

t 


•3° 
■05 

.06 


.20 






.01 


t 
•05 




t 


.40 






.02 
•3° 

t 


.40 


t 




1.76 






























t 
.05 












■45 
. 10 


.22 


■5° 
•31 


.22 

t 

.40 








t 


.20 


. 10 




t 
■>5 


•°5 




0.87 




t 


















t ■' 
















t 
t 














.60 
t 


. 10 


. 12 




- 




t 


t 




+ 


.60 

t 


. 10 




t 


•5° 












t 








t 








t 


1.92 








. 10 
t 






























•45 
t 
■5° 


t 




.09 


0.99 




























t 


•3° 




t 
.20 


t 








•°5 






































.02 






















■ °5 






t 


•°5 
.40 
. 12 










t 


t 
t 
t 


•o.S 




• 13 
■ 30 
.18 


.80 
t 
. 12 




. 10 




•05 


















.02 

•'5 
.„. 


0.52 


















t 




.20 

•55 


t 




.06 


■°5 

.40 
■°5 


1.45 
0.96 








































•38 


■'5 






t 

t 




























.20 

t 
•25 


• 25 




.20 

■24 


1-33 




.06 


.09 


.20 








.85 


. 10 
•34 




t 


.20 
.20 






1. 00 




















.06 
















t 






•03 
.20 
1. 00 
.60 
t 

.08 
.60 
.02 






1. 13 
0.20 
1.90 
0.60 
2.27 
0.68 
1.40 
0.70 
0.80 
0.44 
0.59 
1.25 
0.62 

1. 10 
0.80 

1. 11 
1.25 
1.53 
0.90 
54 
0.74 
0.83 
0.80 
0.96 
0.64 
0.63 
0.50 






t 
•°5 
































■54 


t 






"t" 

t 










t 




.11 






•05 






t 


















■ '5 


























.40 










t 


t 

•°5 
t 


.40 






■47 






.40 
. 10 

t 
t 
t 




t 


t 


•°5 




t 
• 05 




+ 

•3° 
.20 

•°3 


t 


t 


.60 


t 








t 












.46 


.01 


.02 


.48 
.08 
. 10 
• 4i 
■52 
•43 


t 


t 








t 




. 10 

t 


.08 
.20 






t 




t 




•°5 
















t 






t 












t 
t 
t 


















t 






















t 


•°3 










t 
•45 




t 

•57 
. 10 




t 
. 12 


t 
■ °5 

t 

.10 
.40 








.04 
•15 
















t 
+ 
t 






t 




•°5 

t 
























t 
























t 






•°5 














t 
. 10 


Madrid 






































.80 








. 10 


. 10 


















t 

t 

•5° 
•85 

t 

t 

t 






.10 


.10 






















t 


•3° 
. 10 
. 10 

"t" 

. 10 
.04 


t 








t 


t 


.08 
"t" 


.27 

.08 
. 10 
.28 
.60 

•3° 
.60 
.04 
■°5 
•25 
.40 








t 


t 




t 


■13 


.28 






•°5 


•3° 
.40 

t 


.... 




.10 


















t 














"t" 








"t' 






.IO 

t 






t 


t 

.70 
t 


t 












t 


t 


.14 

.02 

.01 

•05 


i 

t 
.20 


. 10 
.01 

t 
t 
.01 

.04 

■ 15 














Norfolk . . . 


•"5 




* 






.01 






•°5 










t 


























.02 

+ 
.02 






.02 
. 12 


North Platte. . . 






t 




t 








t 
.02 


t 
•05 

t 
.01 




t 








•3° 


t 






• 07 
t 
.20 

•°3 

t 
+ 


.01 














t 

.60 
.36 

t 


. 10 


. 10 
"t" 






t 


Odell 






















. 10 










t 








.02 


















t 




t 




t 




.01 


O'Neill 






•03 












t 


t 


t 










•°5 




















t 
.40 






















































•3° 












































































•°5 
.20 


t 
■03 










•°5 


.80 
t 




t 
■05 


•49 




t 


t 






























0.90 
0.90 
°-95 

3-4« 








t 
















t 


•°5 
.10 




t 


•3° 


t 






•03 

•35 

.02 


.80 
t 


•°5 


































•5° 


■3" 
















1. 00 




.40 
•47 
•5i 






















.20 
•°5 


.10 

t 


t 


St. Paul 






■07 

t 










t 
.02 




. 10 




t 
•3" 






















.02 












t 


t 
.20 




.11 




•05 


.10 










1 16 


























0.30 






















t 






t 




























. 10 










. 10 
".40 
















•35 


•05 
.20 
.01 
.60 
.20 


t 
. 10 


























.02 




0.52 








.10 


.10 












. 10 


.01 














































.40 






























81 






















.02 












■°7 






















0.69 












. 10 
•°5 
































.60 
•°5 








.10 
. 10 














■°5 












.20 

•3° 


























■ 05 






0.50 
























•3° 
.10 

. 11 

.24 


.01 
.40 
.10 
t 


t 
.01 


t 

. 10 
.08 
. 10 


















Thedford 






































.05 










.10 

•°3 


t 


°-35 
1. 61 




.06 




t 

•31 


.02 


•25 
■32 










.10 
.01 


.60 
.21 
■30 
■°3 
•95 
•32 

■17 


.02 












.01 

t 




t 


.10 

t 


•°5 

t 


"t" 
•05 


•25 




t 








.02 




+ 


t 


















0.77 
0.83 

I; 32 


Wakefield .. 








t 
• 14 

t 














•05 
.10 


■55 
.08 
•3° 
. 10 
•56 




•°3 








. 12 






















t 




























t 


"t" 

.10 


t 


+ 




t 
"t 


•15 

■ IS 

t 


"f 














.10 


t 








t 












•05 












t 




















o-55 
o-73 










t 










t 




t 




t 






t 


York 























































































* From record of K. I?. Douglas. 



t Trace (when precipitation is less tlian 0.01 of an inch). 



9> 



a** 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. 



REPORT FOR APRIL. 1899. 



NEBRASKA SECTION 



OF THE 



CLIMATE AND CROP SERVICE 



OF THE 



WEATHER BUREAU. 



PUBLISHED BY AUTHORITY OF THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE. 



UNDER DIRECTION OF 

WILLIS L. MOORE 

CHIEF OP WEATHER BUREAU 
BY 

G. A. hOVEhA^D, 

SECTION DIRECTOR, 

Office, University o? Nebraska, Liincolp. 




Natural Hisiur > 












(X 
< 

co 
Q 



O 



> 

OS 
(X 

Q 

< 

CO 

OS 

EU 
H 
O 
CO 

S 

5h 

W 
O 




April, 1899. 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, 

Climate and Crop Service 

OF THE 

WEATHER BUREAU. 

CENTRAL OFFICE: WASHINGTON, D. C. 



NEBRASKA SECTION, 

G. A. LOVELAND, Section Director, 

LINCOLN, NEBR. 



Vol. IV. 



LINCOLN, NEBR. 



No. 4. 



CROP CONDITIONS. 

In most parts of the State the ground was frozen on April 
1. The low temperature of the next week prevented any 
substantial progress in farm work, and spring work on the 
farm in Nebraska practically commenced with the second 
week in April, except in some southwestern counties, where a 
little work had been done earlier in the season. The ground 
was dry, but, with the exception of a few western counties, 
not too dry to work nicely. Warm weather, practically with- 
out rain for the second and third weeks of the month, was 
exceptionally favorable for plowing and seeding. During 
these two weeks spring wheat was about all sown, the bulk 
of the oat crop placed in the ground, and considerable plow- 
ing for corn done. The last week of the month was warm, 
with general showers not sufficiently heavy to retard farm 
work, and at the end of the month small grain was all sown, 
most of the corn ground was plowed, and some little corn 
planted in the southern counties. The exceptionally favor- 
able conditions of these three weeks had made possible prog- 
ress sufficiently rapid to place farmers about in the normal 
condition of advancement with the work at the end of the 
month. However, the dry weather was very unfavorable for 
fall-sown grain. Winter wheat was badly winter killed and 
the continued dry weather of this month further injured it. 
The crop will be very light, and a large per cent of the ground 
sown to winter wheat will be plowed for other crops this 
spring. Spring-sown grain started slowly, and in most sec- 
tions unevenly, because of the dry weather. In some west- 
ern counties the grain did not sprout until the rain the last 
of the month. 

THE STORM OF APRIL 30. 

On Sunday morning, April 30, a storm area was central in 
southeastern Colorado, the lowest barometer reported being 
29.48 inches, at Pueblo. During the day this storm moved 
northeastward across Nebraska, causing thunderstorms in 
most parts of the State, the rain falling early in the morn- 
ing or in the forenoon. In the afternoon, following the rain, 
the air in eastern Nebraska was filled with dust, generally 
accompanied by high south, changing to northwest, wind. 
The following extracts, from the notes of observers, present 
the most noticeable features of the storm : 

On the morning of the 30th of April there was some fog and 0.18 of 
an inch of rain between 7 a. m. and 8:30 a. m. The wind gradually 



veered from northeast at 7 a. m. to south at 2 p. m., and increased in 
force. After the rain yellowish dust was observed, gradually increas- 
ing so that by 2:30 p. m., although sitting by a bay window, it was too 
dark to see to read comfortably by daylight. At 2 p. m. a little rain 
fell, although not a measurable amount, and each drop as it struck the 
glass left a muddy streak. At 3:50 p. m. the wind suddenly ceased to 
blow; it became calm. While closing the shutters I felt something fall- 
ing, and we held a handkerchief 18 inches square out by the corners, 
and in three to four minutes caught dust enough to equal the size of a 
pea. There were 8 or 10 muddy spots on the handkerchief. I noticed 
some pellets in the wrinkles of my coat sleeve and rubbed them with 
my finger, and they left a wet, muddy streak. I have never before seen 
the lawn grass so covered with dust. By 4 p. m. the wind had shifted 
to northwest and was blowing almost a gale The darkness, the dead 
calm coming so suddenly, the weird sky, the rapidly rolling mass of 
yellowish clouds to the northeast, and the falling dust had brought us 
all out on watch, ready for a hail-storm or a tornado and a dive for the 
cave. — Ekastus Smith, Ravenna. 

Afternoon of the 30th the air was full of dust, apparently coming 
from the south, with moderate south wind and some very dirty rain. — 
F. Rein, Ashton. 

After the rain of the 30th dense dust clouds overcast the sky, coming 
from the south; a sprinkle of rain precipitated the dust as mud drops; 
could smell the dust and feel it in eyes and face when turned toward 
the clouds. — G. S. Clingman, Oakdale. 

30th. About four hours after rain, dense clouds of dust in upper cur- 
rents; continued from 1 to 5 p. m.; wind from south ami southwest; 
ground wet here, and dust must have come from dry region. — Joel 
Hull, Minden. 

30th. Moderate wind, but air seemed tilled with dust, and sprinkles 
of rain were muddy. In the afternoon a handkerchief spread on the 
ground was soon covered with coarse dust. — J. E. Goodrich, North 
Loup. 

Thick clouds of dust rolled up from the southwest for hours. They 
obscured the sun, and it became so dark that lamps were lighted. The 
sand and dust settled thickly over everything. Under the microscope 
it showed splinters, pieces of leaves and straw, and even bugs. Muddy 
rain fell at intervals. — Niobrara Pioneer, May 5, 1899. 



OBSERVERS' NOTES. 

Prairie fires covered nearly the whole of southwestern part of this 
county (Rock) and much of the counties adjoining on the south. De- 
struction of property extensive, but no lives nor stock lost. — A. H. 
Gale, Bassett. 

Two light shocks of earthquake about 11 a. m. April 30; both shocks 
distinct and felt by many. — F. Hussong, Merriman. 

Tornado to northwest at 6:30 p. m. 27th, continuing half an hour. 
Later reports indicate it to have been 15 miles distant near the town of 
St. Edwards. — Wm. Webstek, Monroe. 

Great gale of wind on the 16th; prairie fires did great damage in this 
(Logan) and adjoining counties on that date. — G. E. Bolkcom, Nesbit. 

Fires have done over $100,000 damage and two lives lost.— T. B. A. 
Watson, Hartington. 

CLIMATOLOGY OF THE MONTH. 

General characteristics: The month was characterized by 
deficient precipitation and high winds. The temperature 
was exceptionally low during the first ten days, the mini- 
mum temperatures for this period being the lowest observed 
for the first decade in April at several stations. High tem- 
perature the latter part of the month made the average for 
the month about normal. The precipitation was only 40 
per cent of the normal, and most of it fell during the last 
week of the month. The ground was unusually dry, and the 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



April, 1899. 



high winds caused several severe dust storms. An unusually 
large number of prairie fires occurred in the western and 
northern portions of the State; much damage was done to 
property, and in a few instances lives were lost. 

Atmospheric pressure: The mean pressure was 29.98 inches, 
which is a little above the normal for April. The highest 
during the month was 80.47 inches, at Omaha on the 4th and 
Valentine on the 1st, and the lowest, 29.31 inches, at Omaha 
on the 30th. 

Temperature: The mean temperature for the State, as de- 
termined from the records of 106 stations, was 49.0°, which 
is about 0.3° below the average of the past twenty-four years. 
The highest temperature was 97°, at Lynch on the 24th and 
27th; the lowest, 5° below zero, at Hay Springs on the 1st. 
The mean daily range of temperature, as computed from 
the records of 55 stations, was 29.7°. The greatest range at 
any station was 64°, at Albion on the 28th and Kennedy on 
the 21st. 

Wind: The prevailing direction of the wind was from the 
northwest. The average velocity was 11.2 miles an hour, 
which is a little above the normal. The highest was 50 
miles an hour, at Valentine on the 17th, from the northwest. 

Precipitation: The average precipitation for the State, as 
determined from the records of 185 stations, was 0.99 of an 
inch, which is 1.50 inches below the average of the past 
twenty-four years. The largest precipitation reported at 
any one station was 4.63 inches, at Nebraska City, and the 
least, trace, at Holdrege, Cody, and Merriman. 

Snowfall: The average snowfall (in inches) for the several 
sections was as follows: Southeastern, 1.2; northeastern, 
0.7; central, 0.1; southwestern, 0.8; western, 1.0; northwest- 
ern, 0.4; average snowfall for the State, 0.7. 

Thunderstorms: Thunderstorms occurred on the 19th, 25th, 
26th, 27th, 29th, and 30th. 

Fog: Fog was observed on the 15th, 23d, and 24th. 

Halos: Halos were observed on the 1st, 20th, and 22d. 

Hail: Hail fell on the 8th, 19th, 26th, 27th, and 30th. 

Barometer, 'wind, and humidity table. 





Barometer. 


Wind. 


Humidity. 


Stations. 


5 
a 
S 


00 

<a 

X 


6 

Q 


is 

c 


6 
*-» 

a 

n 


i 

> 

c c 



. u 

- 3 
<o 

< 


Maximum 
velocity. 


c 


00 

is 


►J 






1 


e 

s 


oi 

a 


6 

OS 

P 


North Platte . 


29.96 
29.97 
29.98 
29.98 


30.44 

3°-4' 
3°-47 
30.47 


1 

4 


29-33 
29.46 
29.31 
29.44 


30 
30 
30 
16 


9, 195 

8,171 
6,828 
8,402 


12.8 

11.3 

9-5 
11. 7 


45 
40 
36 
56 


se. 
nw. 
s. 
nw. 


3° 

'7 

28 

17 


62 

56 
72 


12 
18 
38 


28 
16 
30 











Means for the six equal sections of the State. 





Temperature. 


Precipitation. 


Number of days— 


Sections. 


Mean. 


Aver- 
age.* 


Mean. 


Aver- 
age. t 


Rainy. 


Clear. 


Partly 
cloudy. 


Cloudy. 


Southeastern 

Northeastern 


5'- 2 
48.8 
49.6 
50.8 
46.9 
46.6 

49-o 


53-2 
5>-2 
5°-4 
5'-3 
47-9 
47-4 
50.2 


'•73 
1.28 
0.96 
0.61 
0.64 
o.73 
0-99 


2.67 
2.86 
2-37 
2.59 
1.83 
2.18 

2.42 


5-2 
4-6 
3-1 
2. 2 

i-9 

1.8 

3-1 


13-6 
12.5 
18.2 
14.6 
18.0 
17.6 

■5-8 


10.6 
12.9 
8.2 

'3-1 
8.9 
7-2 

10.2 


5-7 
4-7 
3-6 

2-3 

3-' 
5-2 

4-1 


Western 

State 





COMPARISON OF PAST APRILS. 

The monthly maximum and minimum temperatures for several sta- 
tions have been obtained for the years 187<> to 18.88, and the following 
table lias been revised, and differs slightly from the comparative tables 
previously published : 



Years. 



1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 

l88u 
1881 
1882 
1*83 
1 88 1 
,885 
1886 
1887 
1 XXX 



Temperature. 


Pre- 
cipita- 








Mean. 


Max. 


Min. 


tion. 


49.8 


85 


16 


'•45 


46.2 


7« 


21 


2.86 


51.4 


82 


28 


1.85 


5'-6 


83 


14 


2.61 


48.7 


90 


20 


0.72 


45-6 


82 


— 4 


2.02 


48.7 


84 


2 


3-58 


49-7 


89 


9 


2-79 


42.6 


76 


10 


2.60 


49.1 


77 


22 


3-30 


47.6 


90 


12 


2.64 


51. 1 


95 


14 


2.32 


52.0 


96 


16 


2-39 


5i-4 


87 


13 


2-33 



Years. 



1891 

1892 

1893 

1894 

1895 

1896 

'897 

1898 

1899 

Average for 
the past 24 
years 



Temperature. 


Mean. 


Max. 


Min. 


5'-° 


94 


7 


5'-2 


100 


6 


45-7 


98 


3 


45-4 


100 


1 


52.0 


98 


'5 


54-8 


96 


'5 


5'-9 


96 


4 


47-8 


90 


8 


48.0 


98 


5 


49.0 


97 


— 5 


49-3 


90 


10 



Pre- 
cipita- 



'•97 
3- '4 
4.00 
'•25 
'•97 
2.28 
4.82 
3-82 
2.14 
0.99 



Climatologrical data— supplemental table. 



Sections and 
stations. 



For ten years 



t For twenty years. 



Northeastern 

Bellevue 

Ewing 

Hooper 

Hubbard 

Lyons 

Monroe 

Schuyler 

Sioux City, Iowa 

Wisner 

Yankton, S.Dak 

Southeastern. 

Benedict 

Bradshaw. 

Burchard 

Chester 

Clatonia 

Eden 

Fairfield 

Fairmont 

Hickman 

McC'ool .Timet. . . 

Marquette 

Nemaha 

Odell 

Osceola 

Palmyra 

Plattsmouth — 
Pleasanthill — 

Salem 

State Farm 

Stockham 

Strang 

Syracuse 

Tablerock 

Valparaiso 

Wilber 

Central. 

Burwell 

Elba 

Greeley 

Palmer 

St.Libory 

Southwestern. 

Bartley 

C'ulbertson 

Hayes Center. .. 

Ough 

Oxford 

Sargent 

Stratton 

Wallace 

Wellfleet 

Western. 

Paxton 

Willard 

Northwestern. 

Bassett 

Cody 

Gordon 

Johnstown 

Merriman 

Spragg 



3 c 



3> 3> 



Precipitation, in 
inches. 



s ■ 
V.V 



50.0 



49-4 
53-2 



48.9 
49' 
54-8 
50.0 



5'-6 

54-4 



47-4 
48.0 
49.8 
52.8 



53-2 



53-7 



54-3 



50.9 



2.17 
1. SB 

1.36 
'•43 

1. 10 

1. 11 
0.62 
0.95 
1.63 
0.61 

1.4H 
'•25 



4 0.58 



1.63 
'•75 
1.58 
2.16 
1.64 
0.65 
3-°9 
0.81 
0.22 
2.72 
3-04 
1.69 
1.20 



1. 00 
2.00 
2.00 
1.47 
2-45 
2-75 

0.42 
o.55 
1. 10 
0.40 
0.43 

0.46 
o.45 
o.34 
0.27 



0.42 
0.42 
o. 10 



0.40 
o.39 

1.42 

T. 
0.70 
o. 10 

T. 
0.81 



s 

£ os 



-0.04 
-'•93 



-2-39 



-3-24 
-2.G8 
-2.15 
-2.63 



—2.04 



+0.03 
— 1.49 
—2-3' 

—1.26 



— 2.04 

-0.58 

— 1.86 
—4.39 
+0.13 
+0.25 



-2.01 
-1.05 
-0.78 
-0.68 



-2.G7 
-2.67 

-2.68 
-2.46 
-3.20 



— 1.72 



-0.94 

-2.C8 

-2.05 



-1.76 



Number of 
days— 



•~ c 



Observers. 



sw. 
nw. 



nw. 
nw. 



se. 
sw. 
nw. 



w. 

sw. 

nw. 

s. 

nw. 

n. 



nw. 
nw. 



E.F.Stouffer. 
G. H.Benson. 
T.W.Lyman. 
M.M.Beacom. 
N.R.Kellam. 
Wm. Webster. 
L.N.Dickinson. 
Weather Bureau. 
Geo. W.Howe. 
Weather Bureau. 

R.B. Brabham. 
E.C.Roggy. 
J. A.Kinsey. 
W.J.Kissick. 

F. W.. Jones. 
D. .I.Wood. 
M. L. Jones. 
G.H.Borden. 
O.O.Franklin. 
F.E.Porter. 
John Ellis. 
R.J. Duff. 
I.B.Huffman. 

G. W.Murbarger. 
W.D.Bancroft. 
W.Z.Pickett. 

J. W. Ingles. 

W.W.MeDermet, 

S.W.Perin. 

J.W.Gray. 

S.Diller. 

L.Howell. 

S.H.Dopp. 

W.J.Craven. 

S.E.Davis. 

W.S.Green. 
S.M.Wellman. 
J. A.Pinkerton. 
E.H.Smith. 
W.I.Meader. 

R.S.Baker. 
Mrs. L. A. Wiblev. 
B.C.Orr. 

Wm.Ough. 

Dr. L. M . Brady. , 

J.S.Spooner. 

C.W.Shurtliff. 

H.S Toogood. 

Wm.G. Hawkins. 

Frank N. Pearl. 
Wesley W.Lewis. 

A. II . Gale. 
W.E.Pontius. 
Amos Burwell. 
F.Avery. 
F. Hussong. 
S.W. Spragg. 



April, 1899. 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



Climatolog-ical data for Nebraska, April, 1899. 



stations. 



Northeastern Sec. 

Agee * 

Blair 

Columbus 

Creighton 

Fremont 

Hartington 

Lynch* 

Madison 

Norfolk 

Oakdale 

Omaha 

O'Neill 

Santee Agency 

Stanton* 

Tekamah 

Wakefield 

Westpoint 

Southeastern Sec. 

Arborville* 

Ashland 

Auburn * 

Aurora * 

Beatrice 

Crete 

David City 

Dawson * 

Edgar * 

Fairbury 

Geneva 

Harvard 

Hebron 

Lincoln 

Nebraska City 

Rulo* 

Seward * 

Superior* 

Tecumseh 

Turlington 

Weeping water * 

Wymore* 

York* 

Central Sec. 

ATbion 

Ansley 

Ashton* 

Broken bow* 

Callaway 

Central City * 

Dunning* 

Ericson * 

Genoa 

Gothenburg 

Grand Island 

Kearney * 

Lexington 

Loup* 

North Loup 

Ord * 

Ravenna 

St. Paul* 

Southwestern Sec. 

Alma 

Arapahoe * 

Beaver City 

Benkelman* 

Bluehill* 

Curtis 

Franklin 

Haigler * 

Hastings* 

Holdrege* 

Imperial 

McCook* 

Madrid* 

Minden 

Redcloud* 

Republican * 

Wilsonville 

Western Sec. 

Camp Clarke 

Gering 

Kimball 

Lodgepole 

Nesbit 

North Platte 

Seneca* 

Thedford * 

Whitman* 

Northwestern Sec. 

Alliance * 

P'ort Robinson 

Hay Springs 

Kennedy 

Kirkwood * 

Springview 

Valentine 



Counties. 



Holt 

Washington. 

Platte 

Knox 

Dodge 

Cedar 

Boyd 

Madison 

...do 

Antelope 

Douglas 

Holt 

Knox 

Stanton 

Burt 

Dixon 

Cuming 



York 

Saunders — 

Nemaha 

Hamilton .. 

Gage 

Saline 

Butler 

Richardson 

Clay 

Jefferson... 
Fillmore — 

Clay , 

Thayer , 

Lancaster.. 

Otoe 

Richardson 

Seward 

Nuckolls 

Johnson 

Otoe 

Cass 

Gage 

York 



Boone 

Custer . . . 
Sherman , 
Custer . . , 

...do 

Merrick . , 

Blaine 

Wheeler.. 
Platte 
Dawson . , 

Hall 

Buffalo... 
Dawson . . 
Sherman . 
Valley ... 

...do 

Buffalo... 
Howard.. 



Harlan 

Furnas 

...do 

Dundy 

Webster 

Frontier — 

Franklin 

Dundy 

Adams 

Phelps 

Chase 

Red Willow. 

Perkins 

Kearney — 
Webster — 

Harlan 

Furnas 



Cheyenne . . . 
Scotts Bluff. 

Kimball 

Cheyenne ... 

Logan 

Lincoln 

Thomas 

....do 

Grant. 



Box Butte . 

Dawes 

Sheridan . . . 

Cherry 

Rock 

Keya Paha . 
Cherry 



,442 
,600 

,203 
,3°9 



,585 
,532 
,722 
,103 
,975 



,472 
,060 
,387 
,3'3 



,100 
,°5' 
,792 
.235 
,368 
,619 
945 
,722 
,3i6 

,033 
,812 
,458 
-199 
941 
842 
,435 
,574 
,H3 
,214 
,080 
,222 
,642 

1,747 
2,3<>7 
2,061 

2,477 
2,555 
1, 70S 
2,621 
2,029 
1,584 
2, 557 
1,860 
2,146 
2,385 
2,067 
1,961 



2,028 
1,796 

1,939 
2,173 
2,147 
2,968 
1,967 
2,553 
1,820 
3,256 
1,932 
2,324 
3,278 
2,506 
3,291 
2, 169 
1,687 
1,939 
2,298 

3,700 



Temperature, in degrees Fahrenheit. 



of. 



4,697 1 
3,820 



2,811 
2,971 
2,842 
3,588 

3,968 
3,764 
3,821 



2,613 



47-3 
48.3 
49.0 
47.6 
49-6 
46.0 
53-2 
47-6 
47-8 
48.0 
5°-.6 
47-6 
49-4 
5°-4 
48.5 
48.4 
5°-3 

45-8 

50-9 

52.1 

50.0 

50.2 

51.8 

53-4 

52.6 

54-0 

51.5 

51-3 

49.8 

52.0 

50.8 

51-3" 

55.2 

51-3 

57 .0 

5°-' 

50.7 

47-i 

53-5 

5'-7 

49-3' 

5°-9 

5"-i 

45-9 

46.8 

50.8 

42.2 

47.0 

50.0 

54-2 

5'-4 

55-9 

48.8 

48.5 

49.8 

48.4 

50.2 

50.8 

52.6 
52-4 
52.6 
50-4 
51-3 
47-2 
5'-7 
51-4 
49.0 
52.2 
54-2 
50.4 
45-0 
50.0 
48.8 
5'-2 
5°-7 

47.6 
47-4 
46.0 
46.6 

47-4 
48. S 



S 
3 O 



— 1.2 



— 2.6 

O.O 

—0.8 

— 1.6 
+3-1 
— 2. 1 
+ 0.4 

— 1-4 
—0.4 
—0.7 

+ 1-5 
+0.7 

—3-9 



-3-6 
—2.6 

—2.3 
— 2.2 

—2. 1 
—0.4 
+3-8 



+0.8 



— 2.1 

—1.4 
— 2. 1 
—0.4 

—1-5 

— 1.2 

—2.7 
+3-7 
—3-5 

— I.Q 

—3-1 



— 2.2 

—2-3 
—0.3 

+0.3 



— 1.6 
—2.4 
— 5-0 

— 2.0 
+ 0.7 

+ I.I 
+0.1 

+4-1 
-2-3 



-0.7 



— 1.2 

0.0 

— 1.0 

-5-6 
—0.9 



— 1-3 
+ 1.1 
+3-9 
— 2.2 

-4-6 
— 1.0 
-5-2 
—3-2 

— 0. I 



+1.5 

-0.8 
— 1-3 
+0.7 
+0.2 



44.4 

44-9 
46.2 

43-5 
46.6 
46.7 
46.4 
47-4 



+ ■•3 

+ 0.7 
—0.9 

— '■5 
— 0.2 



— 1.6 

+0.5 



88 



Precipitation, in inches. 



•s _r 



1. 50 
1.24 
0-34 
1.04 

2-15 

0.31 

1-54 
0.71 
0.48 
1.42 
i-73 
1. 14 
2.31 
1-33 
1.92 
0.76 
1-33 

I- 15 

1. 00 
2.81 
1.08 
0.96 
1. 16 



1-52 
0.97 
1-03 
1.64 
1-39 
0.79 

1.49 
4-63 
1-75 
2.05 

1-55 
3.20 
3-38 
3- "5 
2.06 

1.30 

0-73 
2.02 

1-75 
■•30 
0.55 
t-2.5 



1.85 
1.08 
0.41 
1. 00 
0.25 
0.47 
1.24 

'•75 
1. 21 
0.86 
0.60 

1.96 
o. 10 
0.50 
0.20 
1-52 
0.26 
1-25 

0.87 

1. 00 
T. 
0.64 

0.05 
0.30 
'•23 
0.63 

1-35 
0.40 

o.53 
0.41 
0.65 
1. 10 

0.45 
0.82 



0.20 
1.20 

o.75 
1.30 
..56 
0.41 

0.71 
0.96 
0.74 






—1. 81 



— 2.92 
—2.83 
— 0.64 
—3-32 

— 2.07 

—2.93 

— 2.04 
— 1.69 
— 1.40 
—2.80 
—0.79 
— 2. ro 
—1-47 
—2.28 
—1.32 

—2.16 
— 1. 61 
— 0.42 
— 2.07 
— 1.46 
—1-57 



— 1.27 
—2.23 
—1.45 
—1.50 
—2.14 
— 0.96 
—1. 11 
+ 1.92 
—1-37 
—1-53 
—1.42 
+0. 14 
+0.63 
+ 0.38 



-2.32 

-2.14 
-0-95 
-o-95 
-2.54 
-1.80 
-1.98 



-1. 11 
-1. 91 
-2.54 
-2.68 
-2.39 
-1.94 
-2.67 
-1-37 
-1.61 
-1. 91 
-2-53 

-2.27 
-2.82 
-1.87 
-2.41 
-3-03 
-2-59 
-1. 11 
-0.67 
-2.76 
-3-H 
-1.44 
-2.37 
-1.22 
-2.61 
-'•49 
-2.43 
-3-59 



— 1- 13 
— 0.87 

— 0.20 

— 1.30 

— 1-33 



1.02 
o-59 
0.15 
0.50 
1.20 
0.15 
1-43 
0.18 
0.27 

0-75 
0.82 
0.80 
1.58 
0.36 
1.20 
0.32 
1.20 

0.78 
0.63 
0.85 
0.78 
0.21 
o.45 



o-55 
0.40 
0.70 
0.60 
o.77 
0.49 
0.65 

1-55 
0.65 
0.85 
0.60 
1-25 
1. 14 
1-3° 
1. 18 
0.72 

0.52 

1-79 

1.40 
0.42 
0-55 
0-75 



— 1.90 
—0.87 



— 1.18 
— 0.26 



— 1. 41 
—1.88 
—1-75 



1.20 

o-35 
0.21 
0.70 
0.25 
0.22 
1. 10 

1.30 

0.90 
0.30 
0.41 

1.49 
o. 10 
0.30 
0.20 
0.60 
0.26 
0.63 
0.60 
0.63 
T. 
0.46 
0.05 
0.30 
0.51 
0.50 
0.80 
0.40 

0.53 
0.25 
0.30 
1. 10 
o.35 
0.46 



0.20 
1 .20 

0.75 
1. 10 
1.56 
0.41 
0.30 
0.93 
0.70 



T. 
0.5 



1-5 
0-5 
0.8 
0.5 
0.8 
0.2 



3-8 



1.6 
T. 



T. 



2.5 
T. 

0.8 



0.5 



T. 

1.0 
0.2 
0.6 
1.8 



0.8 



4.8 
4.0 
T. 



T. 

0,0 



T. 

0.4 



T. 

0.0 



T. 

0.0 



T. 



0.0 
2.0 



1.0 

0-5 
0.0 

0.4 



T. 

0. 1 
6.5 
1.0 

o-5 
0.0 



0.0 
0.0 



C8 

£•0 

a 



Sky. 



a 



•^ • *0 
" 3 



— u 



■OS 

=3° 

> 



nw. 

se. 

ne. 

s. 

s. 

nw. 



s. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

n. 

nw. 



ne. 

n. 

se. 

s. 

nw. 

s. 



s. 



nw. 
nw. 



ne. 

ne. 

nw. 

sw. 

se. 

se. 

nw. 

nw. 

s. 

se. 



nw. 
nw. 
sw. 



n. 

n. 

nw. 

nw. 

sw. 

n. 

se. 

sw. 



ne. 

ne. 



n. 

s. 

nw. 

sw. 

nw. 

sw. 

nw. 



nw. 

w. 

nw. 

w. 

nw. 

nw. 



w. 

nw. 

s. 

sw. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 



Observers. 



R.E.Bowden, 

E. A. Palmer. 
C.C.Gray. 

Dr. Geo. Roberts. 

Wm. J. Phillips. 

T. B.A.Watson. 

C.C.Irwin. 

Dr. F.A.Long. 

Dr. P. H.Salter. 

G.S.Clingman. 

U. S. Weather Bureau. 

Chas. N.Cole. 

W.H. Hamlin. 

W.Gerecke. 

Dr. A. D. Nesbit. 

I. H. Weaver. 
C.J.Kadish. 

E.D.Smith. 

Dr. A.S. v Mansfelde. 

G. D. Carrington. 

H.C.Miller. 

A.C.Zimmerman. 

Doane College. 

E.B.Taylor. 

M.L.Libbee. 

L.L. Fuller. 

W.F.Cramb. 

F.M.Flory. 

Dr. J. T.Fleming. 

Dr.C.M.Easton. 

U. S. Weather Bureau. 

E.Morton. 

W.F.Gingrich. 

L.E.Ost. 

L.W.Hahn. 

C.M.Miller. 

Wm.N. Hunter. 

G. Treat. 

II. B.Ware. 
O.P.Lowry. 

F. A.Pettinger. 
Chas.R. Hare. 
F. Rein. 
H.L.Ormsby. 
Geo.B.Mair. 
J. A.McRae. 
L.L.Williams. 
A.Dahl. 

Geo. S.Truman. 
A.V.Carlson. 
E.Corbin. 
C.E.Magner. 
Ira P.Griswold. 
E.S.Hayhurst. 
J.E.Goodrich. 
Jas. Milford. 
Erastus Smith. 
Paul Anderson. 

R.E. Pitcher. 
J F.Edwards. 

C. (J. George. 
W.F. Winger. 
C.S. Draper. 
Dr. S.R. Razee. 
F.T.Owen. 

T. P. F. Maine. 
J.C.Swarts. 
C.Engstrom. 
Robert Malcolm. 
C.T.Watson. 
John McKenzie. 
Joel Hull. 
W.L.Brown. 
W.Burdon. 

D. V. Hostetter. 

Robt. H.Willis. 

J.P.Finlev. 

F.J. Bellows. 

A.B.Persinger. 

Grant E.Bolkeom. 

U. S. Weather Bureau. 

F.D.Gallup. 

B. A.Darrow. 
D.McNall. 

J.Kridelbaugh. 
Post surgeon. 

C. A. Waterman. 
D.A.Piercy. 
Mrs.C. A. Arter. 
Miss Ezada Phelps. 
U.S. Weather Bureau. 



* Temperature data from thermometers not self registering. t Occurred on more than one day. », \ °, etc., indicate number of days missing from observed readings. 
All records are used in determining State or district means, but State and district departures are determined by comparison of current data of only stations with normals 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



April, 1899. 



■So "HY 



00 00 oo ->\o 


no r-.NO tooo 


^O mO"* 


(M ONN o o 


Cni TONQ 


N NO tOCO On 


NO ■* lO U"j On 


fO to to tO "*■ 


On U-, m ~ -f 


NO NO NO 

fomro 



NO N no 000 



m roa 


OnOO 'tO * 


tOCO NO to T 


O»00 tJ" i/^ On 


Tf tJ-nO Ifit 


to to to 


NO Cn! l/-,C0 JJ 


NtM^r^O 


cn m m « m 

CO to to ro to 


mco ei ■* t- 



C fl> oo «*3 •^■oo no oomo n m r-. to •- m tt o «-■ o ■**■ ** on to it>no *t ■* r-. tovo 6 C* no on ■** oo «o tt r-NO -*t « oo r-.co n^o iot« o o nr 

" R ° XBltf mco" loVlTt (^ h CO lO IN CNi **■ esi * \C S^m (j cn NO tO N o" no On to t--NO* Js K, g in « no" n •*■ **■ to M m to cm" o" N "*■ to O* ■*■ m fO p 

^-, ■■ \OnOnOnQnO NO t^NO lONO nOnDnOnONQ NO nOnOnO\0 nOnOvOnO In no m»NO mNO nOnOnd>CnO nO »0 no no NO nOnDnOnONO nOnOnOnOnO nO nO nO NO NO 



■uik 



xujv 



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|xbk 



■uijv 



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uiJV 



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U|M 



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uijm 



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uiw 



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uik 



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uiK 



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XBK 



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in to ro to i 



- t-- o m to on« 



o to — no ■-*- no inco r-. o< 



toco on m o 






on r-, mo t--oo c 
) m t-. ■**■ t^Np rw 



no m w i--.no 

vO no invO *""* 



NO no nS -<ho 



■ •**• fONO * 



to— On 



r- OnO OO nO On 

oo r-.NO Conoco 



'C Nf NO 



m -«t-NO -<*-no no co 

NO NO t^-NO 00 NO »rtN 



iooih r-.NO 



u\ t-. I-.no 



•*■ vN rO . 



CO ONOCO N 



00 00 CO CO CO 



mco — r- m o oo no o moo r- r-. o oo on m 0*00 
coqcoonqcc x cnn^m oc oo co ^oo oo r-oc --joo 



t-.NO mr-co 



r-oo coco no oo co 



m ■»* tono m 



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NO Ttw.m* 



1 t-. t-- NO On On 



t-» t-cc nQ t-. ic f- t-- t-- t 



cni >-. r- no co O co is m 



i-.no CO TfoO 



s cc nq qn t-.co t-NQ r- r-.cc i—no co r-. t-.NO co t^ t^ t^. r-.oo r*. co nn t>. r^ i-s t» r^ r-co 



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i m no no m - 



r-. On OnOO nO tsNO CONO Q nOCOO o on o <o t~- r- m 



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i QnOO f^QO OO CCJONCO 



m n no o no 



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m,NO On *- m noco n it.no 



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00 00 COtNCO 



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i OnnO (OfO NOCSNOOtO OnOn <OCO no 



xco n mco 



r-.cc (sno oo 



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tsCO t -« f- t-- 

in — oo coo 



o NO ^CONO 



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i r- >-i m,NO mNO 



moo t--oo On 



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r-N.NO r-. t>- t 



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kfj^D i-.nO no in>o m,\o no no m.NO NO no nO iOnOiO In 



-* On Q OCO 



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On tO ts t--NO 



O NO no ON 



NO f^-OO NO N 



in t"» r-.NO On nO'ONONOnO nonOnO' 



1--N0 nOnOnO nOnCNOnOn 



— t-*NO CO 



cni to— o 



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r-oo cc nq \q 



oonononoc-. Not-.r-.r-r-. 



I— On ■* to 00 OnNO to ■*■ 



J.CO O* * ON lO^oO , 



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t-.co r- r- r 



r^oo t-- t-.NO 



r- t— f-cc r- co t-ot 



r- t^- t-co r^ 



m.co On m no 00 ■* t-.NO no to •* o to CS 

no t-. t— f. r- r-co nC r- r- r-co co r-oo 



CO to "t t-- -4- 
t-oo r-o r- 



cs o O CO CO 



ON I-- t-- On 



(ONO to tO 



NO r- r-vQ NQ 



m>ND no r-NC 



, r-. tJ- \OnOnO r-r> 



r. nO t-. t-* t- NtN t-NO 



t-NO t-ND r- 



*o n6 ' 



no no no no r- 



On « 00 Cni ro 



a> -^- as cjm h i 



■* f-. On fO 



■- cn -rco co 



-ONONt-ON fOCNim'" 



"■t-00 On CnI On 



O mr-oo 



■ « On ■*■ toOOOmO 



r-.co ■* in m 



Tt m m to •» 



o m to o oo 



OniON O to *h ■- 



f *n ooo*omo noonoooon 



mOO CO ■- On >- 



"Nl-CO CNI oo to 



' tsi/CO i 
J N M i- i 



cO m fO fO (O 



O O i-i to 



O^t-to OnOoOOnOn 



m o o to *— cm no rooo to to to o in to 



H N NM H 



r- m on o no 



Omr-.i«oo O hhco o m.i 



m,NO ij-oo 



to On (ni to m 



Tt- -» rONQ NO 



to o m i-- t-- -*■ t 



OO ""O ON 



CNI On On 1-- fO^O nO NO 



■»J-fO-»fOfO -tJ-rofOrOTf- 



to t— o mi-. 



r-NO no •- t-. m * 



NO OO ON TfvO *0 t-.NO NO 



00 rJ-NO NO O 



■"-no no OO ' 



on moo OO fO 



) fO CN xr, C 



O' tooo oo co — no m 



o mvo aoi Otom- 



w to o no m t-.NO 



m cm oo to ■" 



o t-« mco 



■* o m moo 



o o m to to 



i to lONO 



m, cni •- o t^ 



On -*CO CO t^ 



to On NO 



C a a> « s 
~ SZ C -/. 5 



rr ->»c 



- > i 

* * u. 



CO 



: 'ox cu •£ S ? -c £ 

»^ "S "S b 5 5 •* ' 

c S- t- s « X : 



fa O OS gcfl 



_ — 



S C C i- w 
u CLi 0/ CJ 



S *5 > k i> c — s ^ 

g ca a « o> c cp.h ^5 o *= « cy o o o a E 
SaCCSS £^biJJ SSSS5S5 ^X^OC 



03 

p. o c w -_> 
oj w cd ai: 



j<>-iau « 



"feme 



5.= c ^S 
a; 3 "S . s * 



C5 
Ci 

oo 



03 

Oh 
< 

O 
i— i 

< 



O 

1x5 
03 

Oh 

*-H 

H 

O 
r- 




s 



b> 



3* 









CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



Apkil, 1899 



Daily precipitation for Nebraska, April, 1890. 



Stations 



Agee 

Albion 

Alliance 

Alma 

Ansley 

Arborville 

Ashland 

Auburn 

Aurora 

Bartley 

Bassett 

Beatrice 

Beaver City 

Benkelman 

Blair 

Bluehill 

Brokenbow 

Burchard 

Burwell 

Callaway 

Camp Clarke 

Columbus 

Creighton 

Crete 

Culbertson 

Curtis 

David City 

Dawson 

Dunning 

Edgar 

Ericson 

Fairbury 

Fort Bobinson 

Franklin 

Fremont 

Geneva 

Genoa 

Gering 

Gothenburg 

Grand Island 

Greeley 

Haigler 

Ilartington 

Harvard 

Hastings 

Hayes Center 

Hay Springs 

Hebron 

Holdrege 

Imperial 

Kearney 

Kennedy 

Kimball 

Lexington 

Lincoln 

Lodgepole 

Loup 

Lynch 

Lyons 

Madison 

Madrid 

Merriman 

Minden 

Nebraska City 

Nemaha 

Nesbit 

Norfolk 

North Loup 

North Platte 

Oakdale 

Odell 

Omaha 

O'Neill 

Osceola 

Ough 

Palmer 

Plattsmouth 

Ravenna 

Kedcloud 

Kulo 

St. Paul 

Santee Agency 

Schuyler 

Seneca 

Seward 

Spragg 

Springview 

Stanton 

Superior 

Tecumseh 

Tekamah 

Thedford 

Turlington 

Valentine 

Valparaiso 

Wakefield 

W eeping water 

Westpoint 

Whitman 

Wisner 

York 



Day of month. 



.06 



25. 



.r6 



1.49 

1-79 



.78 



29. 



. a 



JO, 



• 75 



.21 
.08 
.18 
•33 
•15 
•13 
1.30 
.18 
t 



.26 



.08 



1.20 

t 



.70 
1. 10 



I . 20 
.02 



.06 



.46 



.1! 

•■5 
• 34 
■•56 
.06 



.05 



.65 



• 25 

• 4' 
•30 
.20 
.22 

1. 10 
.c8 



.06 



• 38 



t 

• 13 
2.20 



.69 



•37 
1 ■ 55 



• 05 



.27 



I . 3' • 
•34 



.06 



■47 



1.20 
.18 
.06 



.02 
1.58 
•50 



•05 



.',:, 



.29 



I • 25 



•45 

t 

1.20 



.'iS 



1. 14 



• 38 
.02 
1.3° 

t 



■25 • 
.60 • 
.20 . 
.28 1 

.70!. 

M 
.26, 



.45 



1 . 20 
1.20! 



•70 



0! .28 



t Trace (when precipitation is less than o.or of an inch). 






U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. 



REPORT FOR MAY. 1899. 



NEBRASKA SECTION 



OF THE 



CLIMATE AND CROP SERVICE 



OF THE 



WEATHER BUREAU. 



PUBLISHED BY AUTHORITY OF THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE. 



UNDER DIRECTION OF 

WILLIS L. MOORE 

CHIEF OP WEATHER BUREAU 
BY 

G. A. hOVELiAJ^D, 

SECTION DIRECTOR, 

Office, University of Nebraska, bincolp. 







o 
oo 



GO 

Q 



55 



> 

03 

Cu 

Q 

CO 

S 
03 
H 
« 

H 
O 

CO 

HH 

S 
J* 

O 

s 




May, 1899. 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, 

Climate and Crop Service 

OF THE 

WEATHER BUREAU. 

CENTRAL OFFICE: WASHINGTON, D. C. 



NEBRASKA SECTION, 
G. A. LOVELAND, Section Director, 

LINCOLN, NEBR. 



Vol. IV. 



LINCOLN, NEBR. 



No. 5. 



CROP CONDITIONS. 

The first half of May was comparatively dry, with temper- 
ature above normal most of the time. Rapid progress was 
made with corn planting in all parts of the State, and in the 
southern counties most of the corn was planted by the mid- 
dle of the month. This period, however, was unfavorable 
for the growth of small grain. Spring wheat and oats did 
not come up well and grew but slowly. The weeds started 
in the grain fields much sooner than usual, and will decid- 
edly injure the oat crop. In the northeastern counties, how- 
ever, the moisture was sufficient, and small grain started 
well and made good growth. 

The last half of May was wet, but not sufficiently so to 
materially retard farm work. Corn planting was about com- 
pleted by the 25th, although some fields were not planted at 
the end of the mouth. Generally corn came up nicely, and 
the stand is unusually good, except in a few northeastern 
counties, where excessive rains and low temperature pre- 
vented germination ; here the stand, is rather thin and con- 
siderable replanting has been necessary. The rainfall in 
western counties has been sufficient for an excellent growth 
of grass on the ranges, and stock has done well. Sugar beets 
came up nicely, and cultivation and thinning commenced 
the last week of the month. 



SEVERE STORM IN KEARNEY COUNTY. 

The following account of a severe storm is extracted from 
an excellent and very full report furnished by Mr. Joel Hull, 
of Minden. It is regretted that lack of space prevents the 
publication of the report in full : 

At 7:30 p. in. of May 26 an unusual commotion was noticed in the 
clouds at a point seemingly about 5 miles southwest of Minden. The 
general movement of the mass of clouds was northeastward. Distant 
thunder was heard and occasional flashes of lightning noticed. At 
7:45 p. m., at a point due west about 3 miles, the clouds became blacker, 
the north edges seeming to meet a wind blowing in an opposite direc- 
tion, which turned them abruptly upward 500 or 600 feet, and for a 
short time the general movement eastward ceased, replaced by the up- 
ward movement at the front. In a few moments a small, bright spot 
appeared in the midst of the upper formation, which increased rapidly 
in size to 5 or 6 degrees in width, egg shaped, the smaller end down. 
In one or two minutes there descended from the smaller end a finger- 
shaped projection similar in appearance to the little cloud, except very 
much resembling in shape a huge trunk of an invisible elephant. As 
it approached the earth, about 8 p. m. almost due west, there appeared 
on the earth's surface a small smoke [probably dust — Ed.] similar to 



that from a locomotive, in a moment a large smoke like that from a 
large building burning, and in two minutes a boiling, swirling smoke 
covering an area of about one-fourth of a square mile; the latter ap- 
pearance when the trunk had touched or made connection with the 
surface smoky cloud. Thunder and lightning increased in intensity 
and frequency from all points westward up to this time (about 8 p. m. ) 
when the center was northwest of point of observation. It continued 
to expand at the earth's surface until it had passed to the north and a 
few points east of north, the south edge reaching the north line of this 
city. A great roaring as of hail was heard, and frequent flashes of 
lightning passed from the upper to the lower series of clouds. At 
8:15 p. m., at a point about 20 degrees east of north, the arm com- 
menced to lift its lower extremity from the surface cloud, rapidly con- 
tracting, and in two minutes it was contracted into the small, bright 
cloud from which it originated, which cloud seemed to be the center 
of the storm. At 8:30 it faded almost out, but soon reappeared when 
nearly northeast, when for a few minutes the finger was again let down 
toward the earth, but soon after drawn up again. The distance by 
this time was so great that the motions were indistinct. The roaring 
of the surface cloud ceased when the slim, finger-shaped cloud was 
withdrawn. The thunder and lightning diminished in a corresponding 
ratio, but did not entirely cease till the storm had entirely passed. 
Flashes of lightning were seen until 9:30 p. m., and by 10:00 p. m. all 
disturbance had ceased, stars became visible, and the wind was a light 
breeze from the south. Several houses and barns were damaged by 
the wind, but no person killed. Heavy rain and large hail accompanied 
the storm. The path of the storm widened in its eastward progress. 
The tornado in Range 15 is reported to have simultaneously existed in 
several places, showing that there were several twisters converging 
and joining at the point where the first material damage occurred. 
From there it moved as having but one center, occasionally lifting the 
trunk from the earth, and then letting it down again farther on. After 
it passed into Adams County it moved with increased velocity and 
became a straight wind, with heavy hail and rain. From 7:30 to 8:30 
p. m., while passing this station, as also reported from many points near 
the line of the track of the tornado, very sudden changes of tempera- 
ture of the air were noticed — from temperate to quite hot, and in a min- 
ute or two changed to a chilly feeling: but no thermometrical observa- 
tions were made, as all were watching the storm. This is the first visit 
of a tornado to this county known to the oldest inhabitant. The dis- 
tance from point of observation to the nearest point in the line of the 
track is If miles. Only a trace of rain fell here, with an occasional 
hailstone. On the north side of the center from 2 to 8 miles there was 
heavy rain, with hailstones of large size. 



OBSERVERS' NOTES. 

On the 27th a tornado started about 4 miles north and 1 west of 
Aurora and, moving northeast, destroyed houses and barns and killed 
stock. — John Ellis, Marquette. 

Water spout Saturday night, May 27, 12 to 15 miles east of town, 
doing great damage, washing out 20 large county bridges on East Bow 
Creek. — T. B. A. Watson, Hartington. 

On 30th, at 8:55 p. m., a peculiar hail-storm; very large hail, but only 
here and there one; no damage done. One hailstone measured 1 inch 
long; oval and Hat, with a beautiful center of clear ice. Only .03 of an 
inch of rain fell. — G. D. Cakrington, Auburn. 

On the 21st, at 4 p. m., a small tornado passed 1 mile north of town; 
direction of movement, a little south of east. It traveled 3 miles, then 
disappeared. Some barns, corn cribs, windmills, and one house dam- 
aged. — M. L. Libbee, Dawson. 



CLIMATOLOGY OF THE MONTH. 

General ehararteristics: The month is best characterized as 
about a normal May. The temperature and rainfall were 
both very slightly above normal. The first days of the month 
were the coldest in all parts of the State. There was no hot 
spell, and the hottest day of the month differs widely at dif- 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



May, 1899. 



ferent stations. Rain foil in the State on every day of 
the month. The 19th and 20th were days of general and 
heavy rain. Flurries of snow fell at Kimball on the 2d. 

Atmospheric pressure: The moan pressure was 29.89 inches, 
which is 0.05 of an inch below the normal for May. The 
highest during the month was 30.29 inches, at Lincoln on 
the 13th, and the lowest, 29.41 inches, at North Platte on 
the 2d. 

Temperature: The mean temperature for the State, as de- 
termined from the records of 104 stations, was 59.0°, which 
is about 0.3° above the average of the past twenty-four years. 
The highest temperature was 100°, at Lynch on the 11th and 
Palmer on the 27th ; the lowest, 21°, at Camp Clarke on the 
4th. The mean daily range of temperature, as computed 
from the records of 54 stations, was 25.3°. The greatest 
range at any station was 57°, at Kimball on the 12th. 

Wind: The prevailing direction of the wind was from the 
southeast. The average velocity was 11.4 miles an hour, 
which is a little above the normal. The highest was 54 
miles an hour, at Valentine on the 25th, from the southeast. 

Precipitation: The average precipitation for the State, as 
determined from the records of 141 stations, was 3.71 inches, 
which is 0.10 of an inch above the average of the past twenty- 
four years. The largest precipitation reported at any one 
station was 8.30 inches, at Norfolk, and the least, 0.15 of an 
inch, at Seneca. 

Auroras: Auroras were observed on the 1st, 2d, 3d, 12th, 
and 30th. 

Frost: Frost occurred on the 2d, 3d, 4th, 5th, 6th, and 22d. 

Hail: Hail fell on the 2d, 6th, 9th, 13th, 14th, 15th, 16th, 
17th, 19th, 21st, 22d, 24th, 25th, 26th, 27th, 28th, 29th, 
and 30th. 

Thunderstorms: Thunderstorms occurred on the 2d, 5th, 
6th, 7th, 9th, 10th, 13th, 14th, 15th, 16th, 17th, 18th, 19th, 
20th, 21st, 22d, 23d, 24th, 25th, 26th, 27th, 28th, 30th, and 
31st. 

Parhelia: A parhelion was reported on the 28th. 

Barometer, -wind, and humidity table. 







Barometer. 






Wind. 






Humidity. 


Stations. 


p 


m 

a> 

- 

s 


6 


•£i 

& 



►J 




<3J 
> 

6 c 
— « 


Eh 




be. 

a> 
< 


Maximum 
velocity. 


d 

CD 

s 


GO 
0J 



►J 






3 



u 

5 


6 
Is 


6 
P 


Lincoln 

North Platte . 

Valentine — 


29.87 
29.88 
29.89 
29.89 


30.29 

30.19 
30.28 
30.21 


13 
. 13 

■3 
13 


29.48 
29.41 
29.48 

29-5' 


30 

2 

3° 

II 


9,091 
8,434 
7. '9i 
9.734 


12.2 
". 3 

9-7 
I3-I 


40 
42 
32 

54 


sw. 

nw. 
sw. 
se. 


27 
27 
26 
25 


69 

68 

74 


29 

21 
31 


31 
11 
31 









Means for the six equal sections of the State. 



Sections. 



Southeastern . . 
Northeastern.. 

Central 

Southwestern . 

Western 

Northwestern 



State. 



Temperature. 



Mean. 



63.7 
60.3 
60. 1 
62.8 
55-0 
55-7 

59-6 



Aver- 
age.* 



61.4 
59-4 
59-2 
61.2 
57-3 
56.1 

59-1 



Precipitation. 



Mean . 



4.21 
5.02 
3-29 
2.70 
3-34 
3-7° 

3-7' 



Aver- 
age, t 



4-34 
4.09 
3-&7 
3-8i 
2.70 
3.06 

3-94 



Number of days- 



Rainy. 



11. 6 
•3-3 
10. 1 
7-4 
8.1 
10-3 



Clear. 



9-7 
7-5 
12.3 
11. 9 
12. 1 
"•5 
10.8 



Partly 
cloudy. 



12.8 
12.2 

7-6 
12. 1 
11. 7 

9.0 

10.9 



Cloudy. 



8.5 
11. 2 
11. 1 

6.9 

7.2 
i°-5 

9.2 



* For ten years. 



t For twenty years. 



COMPARISON OF PAST MAYS. 

The monthly maximum and minimum temperatures tor several sta- 
tions have been obtained for the years 1870- to 1HNH, ami tin* following 
table has been revised, and differs slightly from the comparative tallies 
previously published : 



Years. 



1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
18S0 
1881 

r882 
1883 
1S84 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 



Temperature. 


Pre- 
cipita- 
tion. 








Mean. 


Max. 


Min. 


61. 1 


88 


34 


2-54 


57-8 


86 


32 


5-79 


54.8 


9' 


32 


4.09 


63.0 


9t 


34 


3-43 


63-3 


94 


34 


2. 1 1 


64.7 


96 


37 


6.28 


54-6 


89 


33 


4-93 


55-4 


93 


28 


5-39 


S8.6 


88 


26 


3.06 


58.1 


86 


18 


3-73 


64.3 


IOI 


24 


3-39 


63.6 


98 


22 


2.27 


54-6 


90 


26 


5.83 


58.3 


95 


22 


2.69 



Years. 



1 890 

1891 

1892 

'893 

'894 

1895 

1896 

1897 

1898 

1899 

Average for 
the past 24 
years 



Temperature. 


Mean. 


Max. 


Min. 


58.4 


100 


14 


59-4 


100 


20 


5'-7 


98 


27 


56.6 


IOI 


18 


62.7 


'°5 


12 


60.9 


I [O 


23 


63.6 


102 


25 


61.3 


IOI 


19 


57-2 


98 


27 


59-<> 


IOO 


21 


59-3 


96 


25 



Pre- 
cipita- 



2-34 
2.90 
5-63 
2.66 
0.91 
2.40 

4-°3 
1.66 
4.86 
3-7' 



3.61 



Climatolog-ical data— supplemental table. 



Sections and 
stations. 



Northeastern. 

Bellevue 

Ewing 

Hubhard 

Lyons 

Monroe 

Schuyler 

Sioux City, Iowa 

Wisner 

Yankton, S. Dak 
Southeastern. 

Benedict 

Bradshaw 

Burchard 

Chester 

Clatonia 

Eden 

Fairfield 

Fairmont 

Hickman 

McCool.Junct. . . 

Marquette 

Nemaha 

Odell 

Osceola 

Palmyra 

Plattsmouth — 
Pleasanthill — 

Salem 

State Farm 

Strang 

Syracuse 

Tablerock 

Valparaiso 

Wilber 

Central. 

Burwell 

Elba 

Greeley 

Palmer 

St.Libory 

Southwestern. 

Bartley 

Culbertson 

Hayes Center. .. 

Ough 

Oxford 

Sargent 

Stratton 

Wallace 

Wauneta 

Wellfleet 

Western. 

Paxton 

Thedford 

Willard 

Northwestern. 

Bassett 

Cody 

Gordon 

Johnstown 

Merriman 

Spragg 



=8 " 



59.0 
63.6' 
59-0 



63-6 



59-8 
60.8 
68.2 



64.6 
65.4 



62.0 
68.8 
64.6 
66.0 
63-4 
63- 3 



65.5 
65.6 



61.4 
61.8 



67-5" 



59-8 



Precipitation, in 
inches. 



s g 



5-54 
3-°5 
5-15 
5-94 
4.18 
5-95 
6.18 
4.18 
4.24 

3-54 
5- '9 
3-94 
4.91 
3-36 
6.63 
3-IO 
3-19 
3-82 
2.48 
4-37 
6.71 
5-40 
4.61 
5.20 
5-13 
3-41 
5-25 
2.32 
3.18 
4-94 
5-47 
4.16 
3-4° 

2.97 
4-3° 
3-40 
3-99 
2.48 

'■79 
1-93 

3-24 
1.44 



1.83 
1. 61 
4-6s 
1.62 
5-33 

2-57 
2.95 
4-63 

5-54 



5-25 
4-75 
3.00 
3-42 






+ 1.78 
+0.53 



+2.33 
+°- 55 
+ I-54 
+ 2.28 
+ 0.08 
+0.31 

— 0.09 



—0.63 
+ 1.5' 



+0.96 
— 0.91 
+0.07 
—0.32 
— 1.22 
+0-54 
+ 0.52 
+ 0.15 
+0.01 

+ I.O! 

+ 0.82 



—0.28 
—2.28 

—1-37 
+ 0.51 
+ 2.15 



+0.60 

+ 1.09 
+ 1.52 

+0.40 
+ 0.37 
— 1. 16 



— o. 53 
+0-75 
— 1. 10 



—0.88 
—0-53 
+ 2. 11 



+ 2-99 



Number of 



se. 
sw. 



se. 
sw. 



sw. 
e. 



Observers. 



E.F.Stouffer. 
G. 11. Benson. 
M.M. Beacom. 
N.R.Kellam. 
Wm. Webster. 
L.N. Dickinson. 
Weather Bureau. 
Geo.W. Howe. 
Weather Bureau. 

R.B. Brabham. 

E.OUoggy. 

J. A.Kinsey. 

W.J.Kissick. 

F.W.Jones. 

D.J.Wood. 

M. L.Jones. 

G.H.Borden. 

O.O.Franklin. 

F. E. Porter. 
John Ellis. 
R.J. Duff. 
I.B.Huffman. 

G. W.Murbarger. 
W.D.Bancroft. 
W.Z.Pickett. 

J. W. Ingles 

W.W.McOermet. 

S.W.Perin. 

S. Oilier. 

L.Howell. 

S.H.Dopp. 

W.J.Craven. 

S.E.Davis. 

W.S.Green. 
S.M.Wellman. 
J. A.Pinkerton. 

E. II. Smith. 
W.I.Meader. 

R.S.Baker. 

Mrs.L.A.Wibley. 

R.C.Orr. 

Wm.Ough. 

Dr. L.M. Brady. 

J.S.Spooner. 

G'.W.Shurtliff. 

H.S.Toogood. 

J.W.Haim. 

Wm.G. Hawkins. 

Frank N. Pearl. 
B. A. Oarrow. 
Wesley W.Lewis. 

A. H. Gale. 

W.K.Pontius. 
Amos Burwell. 
F.Avery. 

F. Hussong. 
S.W. Spragg. 



May. 1899. 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



Climatolog-ical data for Nebraska, May, 1899. 



Stations. 



NORTHEASTERN SEC. 

Agee * 

Blair 

Columbus 

Creighton 

Fremont 

llartington 

Hooper * 

Lynch* 

Madison 

Norfolk 

Oakdale 

Omaha 

O'Neill 

Santee Agency 

Stanton* 

Tekamah 

Wakefield 

Westpoint. 

Southeastern Sec. 

Arborville* 

Ashland 

Auburn * 

Aurora * 

Beatrice 

Crete 

David City 

Dawson * 

Edgar* 

Fairbury 

Geneva 

Harvard 

Hebron 

Lincoln 

Nebraska City 

Rulo* 

Seward * 

Superior* 

Tecumseh 

Turlington 

Weepingwater * 

Wymore* 

York* 

Central Sec. 

Albion 

Ansley 

Ashton* 

Brokenbow* 

Callaway 

Central City* 

Dunning* 

Ericson * 

Genoa 

Gothenburg 

Grand Island 

Kearney * 

Lexington 

Loup* 

North Loup 

Ord * 

Ravenna 

St. Paul* 

Southwestern Sec 

Alma 

Arapahoe * 

Beaver City 

Benkelman* 

Bluehill* 

Curtis 

Franklin 

Haigler * 

Hastings* 

Holdrege* 

Imperial 

McCook* 

Madrid * 

Minden 

Kedcloud* 

Republican* 

Wilsonville 

Western Sec 

Camp Clarke 

Gering 

Kimball 

Lodgepole 

Nesbit 

North Platte 

Seneca* 

Whitman* 

Northwestern Sec 

Alliance * 

Fort Robinson 

Hay Springs 

Kennedy 

Kirkwood * 

Springview 

Valentine 



Counties. 



Holt 

Washington. 

Platte 

Knox 

Dodge 

Cedar 

Hooper 

Boyd 

Madison 

...do 

Antelope — 

Douglas 

Holt. 

Knox 

Stanton 

Burt 

Dixon 

Cuming 



York 

Saunders 

Nemaha 

Hamilton — 

Gage 

Saline 

Butler 

Richardson .. 

Clay 

Jefferson 

Fillmore 

Clay 

Thayer 

Lancaster 

Otoe 

Richardson .. 

Seward 

Nuckolls 

Johnson 

Otoe 

Cass 

Gage 

York 



Boone 

Custer 

Sin" 'inn . . 
('US 

...<k'- 

Merrick 

Blaine 

Wheeler 

Platte 

Dawson 

Hall 

Buffalo 

Dawson 

Sherman 

Valley 

...do 

Buffalo 

Howard 



Harlan . . . 
Furnas .... 

...do 

Dundy — 
Webster . . 
Frontier . . 
Franklin . . 

Dundy 

Adams 

Phelps 

Chase 

Red Willow.. 

Perkins 

Kearney 

Webster 

Harlan 

Furnas 



Cheyenne . . . 
Scotts Bluff. 

Kimball 

Cheyenne . . . 

Logan 

Lincoln 

Thomas 

Grant 



Box Butte . 

Dawes 

Sheridan . . . 

Cherry 

Rock 

Keya Paha . 
Cherry 



1,442 
1,600 
1,203 
i,3"9 



1,585 
i,53 2 
1,722 
1,103 
'.975 



1,472 
1,060 
1,387 
i,3'3 



1,100 
1,051 
1,792 
1,235 
1,368 
1,619 

945 
1,722 

1,316 

1.633 
1,812 
1,458 
1,199 
941 
842 

1,435 
1,574 
1,113 
1,214 
1,080 
1,222 
1,642 

1.747 
2,3"7 
2,061 
2,477 
2,555 
1,708 

2,621 

2,029 

1,584 

2,557 
1,860 

2, 146 

2,385 
2,067 
l,96l 



2,028 
1,796 

1,939 
2,173 
2,147 
2,968 
1,967 

2,553 
1,820 
3,256 
1,932 
2,324 
3,278 
2,506 
3,294 
2, 169 
1,687 
1,939 



3,700 



Temperature, in degrees Fahrenheit. 



4,697 
3.820 



2,841 
2,971 
3,588 

3,968 
3,764 
3,821 



2,613 



58.3 
60.2 
60.4 
58.8 
60.6 
57-4 
64. 2 
61.2 
58.6 
59-4 
59-5 
62.3 
57-8 
60.9 
60.7 
60.4 
60.0 
62.0 



60.3 
62.6 
65.0 
61.3 
62.6 
63.2 
63.6 
65.8 



64.4 

62.6 

61.6 

62.7 

62.2 

63. 6* 

68.8 

62.4 

66.6 

63.0 

62.1 

59-8 

65-7 

61.2 

59-2 

58.8 
60.4 

55-5 
58.2 
61.2 



61.4 
60.6 
59-4 
62.4 
62.0 
61.0 
59-1 
59-6 
58.4 
60.0 
61.4 

61.8 
64-5 
63.8 
62.4 
63.1 



64.6 
65-4 
61.8 



59-6 
64.0 
57-9 
61.7 



s 

£ d 
a o 



-0.4 



—0.8 
+ 1.2 

+ 1.1 
— °-5 



+ 0.6 
—0-7 
+0.6 
+ 1.4 
+0.6 

-°-3 
—0.7 

—0.7 



+ 1.2 
—0.4 
+2.6 
— 1.0 

+ 1.8 
+2.4 
+5-5 



—0-5 
+ 1.1 
— o. 1 
+0.6 
+ 1.6 
+2.3 
+ 0.4 
+4.0 
+ 0.7 
+0.1 
+ 1.6 



—0.4 

—2.5 
+0.1 
0.0 
—6.8 
—0.3 
—3-4 



0.0 
+ 0.8 
—1.8 
+ 1-9 
+ 1.2 
+ 1-7 



+0.7 
+ i.o 



+0.9 
+ 1.6 
—0.6 



+3-o 



+ 1.8 



— 0.2 
—0.9 
—1.6 

+ 1.4 



62.5 
63-4 

56.0 

54-2 
54-5 
56.2 
56.8 
58.2 
51.6 
52.5 

53-7 
53-1 



57-4 
57-0' 
56.2 
56.8 



+ 1.0 



—0-3 
—0.8 

— 1. 1 

— 1.4 
— o. 1 
—6.2 
—2-3 

+ 0.5 
— 3-° 



9° 



88 



90 



+ 0.4 



— 1-3 
+ 0.2 



78 



25+ 



5° 



46 



45 



Precipitation, in inches. 



of, 



3.00 

5-21 

5-19 
4.32 
6.90 
7-63 
3-74 
3-91 
5-93 
8.30 

5-47 
4-45 
3-40 
2.47 
6.07 
4.00 
5-74 
5-6 5 

6.60 

4-34 
5-54 
3-53 
5-50 
2.71 



4.67 
2.89 
4.60 
2-57 
2.98 
4-05 
2.29 
6.08 
4-3° 
3-59 
3- 10 
4-79 
4.89 
3-74 
5-34 
2.69 

4-5° 
2.12 

2.82 
3- 08 
2.21 
5-'2 



3-91 
5-54 
4.01 
4-99 
4-77 
2.66 
2.47 
2.81 
2.62 
1-93 
2-77 

2.01 
0.90 
1.28 
1-25 
3-40 
2.72 
5-96 
2.13 
2.26 
7.25 
2.44 
1-57 
2.75 
2.83 
2.94 
3.18 
1-95 

2-75 

7.72 

3-67 
1-25 
5-47 
3.58 
0.15 
1-95 

3-45 
3.00 



1-73 
3-63 
4. 11 



s 

o_: 
■ — 

P 



+0.07 
—0.79 
+ 1.82 
+0.79 
+2.50 
+3-17 



+ 1.28 
+ 1.60 

+4-45 
+ 1.89 
— 0.09 
+0.56 
— 0.64 
+ 2.28 
— 0.40 
+ 1.49 
+ 1.85 

-2.56 
+ 1.38 
— 0.90 
—0.18 
+ 1.40 
— 0. 14 



+0-73 
—0.66 
+ 0.04 
-1.87 
— 0.S8 
—0.22 
— 2.20 
+ 1-37 
-1.85 
—0.98 
— 0.72 
— 0.02 
+ 1.04 
—0.63 



— 1-15 

+ 1.51 
—0.65 

+ o-45 
+ 0.44 
+0.27 
+ 1.42 



+ 1. 14 
+ 1.46 
+ 1-5° 
+ 0.07 
+0.17 
+ 0.13 
+ 0.13 
+ 0.07 
+0.50 

— 1.48 
—0-59 

—1.62 

— 1-73 
—1. 12 
—1. 19 
— 0.70 
+0.30 
+ 2.38 
—1. 17 
—1.24 
+3-99 
—0.43 
— 0.92 
+ 0.76 

—2.39 
+ 0.24 

—0.31 

— 1.03 



+4.90 
+0.93 
— 1.30 
+ 2.30 
+0.94 
—2.44 
— o. 11 

+0.66 
+0.37 



—i. 15 
+0.64 
+ 1.23 
—0.54 



"I 

CD 
U 

O 



0.85 
i-57 
1.04 
1.02 
3-43 
2.85 
0.88 
1.27 
2.70 

3-3° 
2.30 

1-33 
1.03 
0.64 
2.32 
1.32 
1.65 
1.60 

3-43 
1. 21 
2.79 
0.86 
1.96 
0.62 



2-74 
1.48 
1.63 
0.49 
0.90 
2.63 
0.62 
2.98 

2.15 
0.52 
1. 00 
2.37 
2.50 
1-75 
1.76 
0-53 

1.29 
0.55 
0.85 
0.71 
0.70 
1.50 



1-30 
2.70 
1.02 
2.70 
2.00 
1-23 
0.70 
1-25 
0.66 
0.60 
1. 17 

0-55 
0.90 

0.51 
0.40 

o-95 
0.91 

i-73 
0-55 
0.60 
4.00 
0.80 
0.77 
0.80 
0.86 
0-77 
0.85 
0.85 

0.68 
1.72 
1.70 
0.60 
1.60 
0.81 
o. 10 
0.80 

0.90 
1.50 



0.36 
1.27 
0.85 
0.48 



a 



Sky. 



2% 
a 




nw. 

se. 



nw. 

s. 



s. 
e. 
se. 



nw. 

se. 

nw. 

e. 

s. 



se. 

se. 

se. 

n. 

nw. 

se. 

nw. 

s. 

s. 

nw. 



e. 

se. 

n. 



sw. 
se. 
se. 
nw. 



sw. 
sw. 

se. 

se. 

s. 

e. 

se. 

se. 

nw. 

nw. 

e. 
sw. 



nw. 
se. 
nw. 
e. 



Observers. 



R.E.Bowden. 

E. A. Palmer. 

C.C.Gray. 

Dr. Geo. Roberts. 

Wm. J. Phillips. 

T. B.A.Watson. 

T.W.Lyman. 

C.C.Irwin. 

Dr. F.A.Long. 

Dr. P. H.Salter. 

G.S.Clingman. 

U. S. Weather Bureau. 

Chas. N.Cole. 

W.H.Hamlin. 

W.Gerecke. 

Dr. A. D. Nesbit. 

I. H. Weaver. 

C.J.Kadish. 

E.D.Smith. 

Dr. A. S. v Mansfelde. 

G.D.Carrington. 

H.C.Miller. 

A. C. Zimmerman. 

Doane College. 

J. K.Townsend. 

M.L.Libbee. 

L.L. Fuller. 

W.F.Cramb. 

F.M.Flory. 

Dr. J. T.Fleming. 

Dr.C.M.Easton. 

U. S. Weather Bureau. 

E.Morton. 

W.F.Gingrich. 

L.E.Ost. 

L.W.Hahn. 

C.M.Miller. 

Wm.N. Hunter. 

G. Treat. 

H.B.Ware. 

O.P.Lowry. 

P. A.Pettinger. 

Chas. R. Hare. 

F.Rein. 

H.L.Ormsby. 

Geo.B.Mair. 

J.A.McRae. 

L.L.Williams. 

A.Dahl. 

Geo. S.Truman. 

A. V.Carlson. 

E.Corbin. 

C.E.Magner. 

Ira P.Griswold. 

E.S.Hayhurst. 

J.E.Goodrich. 

Jas. Milford. 

Erastus Smith. 

Paul Anderson. 

R.E. Pitcher. 
J F.Edwards. 
C.G.George. 
W.F. Winger. 
C.S. Draper. 
Dr. S.R. Razee. 
F.T.Owen. 
T.P.F.Haine. 
J.C.Swarts. 

C. Engstrom. 
Robert Malcolm. 
C.T.Watson. 
John McKenzie. 
Joel Hull. 
W.S.Burdick. 
W.Burdon. 

D. F. Hostetter. 

Robt. H.Willis. 
J.P.Finley. 
F.J. Bellows. 
A.B.Persinger. 
Grant E.Bolkcom. 
U. S. Weather Bureau. 
F.D.Gallup. 
D.McNall. 

J.Kridelbaugh. 
Post surgeon. 
C. A. Waterman. 
D.A.Piercy. 
Mrs.C.A.Arter. 
Miss Ezada Phelps. 
U.S. Weather Bureau. 



* Temperature data 
All records are used 



from thermometers not 
in determining State or 



self registering, t Occurred on more than one day. », \ °, etc., indicate number of days missing from observed readings 
district means, but State and district departures are determined by comparison of current data of only stations with normals 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



May, 1899. 



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CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



May, 1899. 



Daily precipitation for Nebraska, May, 1899. 





Day of month. 




Stations. 


i. 


2. 


3- 


4- 


5- 


6. 


7- 


8. 


9- 


10. 


11. 


12. 


13- 


14. 


■5- 


16. 


'7- 


18. 


19- 


20. 


21. 


22. 


23- 


24. 


25- 


26. 


27. 


28. 


29. 


30. 


3'- 


5 






.26 
1.06 










t 
.21 

t 






•°9 




t 


t 


•03 


.07 
■05 


t 
I 
"t 


• 14 
•33 
.62 
.eg 


■30 
•49 
•55 
.22 

•45 


.18 
.38 
.20 

•15 
.20 

•43 
.76 

2.79 
.64 
.68 
•17 

1.96 

•13 
■95 
. 10 
1-95 
•56 

.20 
.02 

•35 

•30 
.62 
• 17 
•91 


.85 
.46 
•35 
•27 
•32 

• 79 
•37 
.82 

•43 
.07 
1.07 
.14 
.01 

1-57 
•05 
•5° 
.60 
•52 
.20 
•37 
1.04 
1.02 

• 42 

.12 

•5° 


•23 
•35 
. 10 

.18 
t 
. 10 


t 
+ 

•°5 
.02 
t 
■04 


.28 

.24 
+ 


•25 
.10 

•55 

•54 
.06 




•03 


.85 


•13 

..29 








3-oo 
4-50 
3-45 






.21 








•19 


•°5 










.90 


. 10 
.24 














+ 


.90 
. 10 

.06 

.02 
t 


+ 


t 






















.16 












t 

3-43 

. 10 
.29 








•51 
• °5 
1. 21 
08 
t 

•33 
.... 












t 

t 

.07 

•54 

.02 


■05 
.06 
.08 

.02 


t 

t 

■03 
. 10 
•35 


•05 
• 76 
•5° 


.06 
. 10 
•°3 
t 




t 






Arborville 

Ashland 


• 44 


• 19 






.06 












+ 


6.60 


t 


.02 
• 33 


.04 
.08 












4-34 
5-54 
3-53 
■•79 
5-54 
5-50 
1.28 








.14 


•03 




Aurora 










•°5 
.21 

1.03 
•05 
■35 






• 03 


.02 

+ 
. 10 


■04 


.86 
■15 


• 14 

• 42 
•03 
.06 
•5' 

.28 
.38 
.24 










.08 


Bassett 




•35 

.45 

•f 
.27 

.08 






t 




.10 
.08 


.„. 




"56 
.12 

"t" 
• 32 


.08 
.01 

• 13 
•03 


.02 
.... 

.16 


•05 
.38 

. 10 

.07 
.42 


•25 


.10 
•37 

•45 

'.'48 
•50 
•25 


.01 
.12 

.04 
•15 


.83 

.01 

1° 
.08 


2-35 


. 10 
■45 






















.01 


■15 


+ 

t 
.09 


• 03 












•15 
.48 
.10 
•17 
■05 
•15 
.70 
.17 
+ 

•55 
■25 
•45 
•31 


1. 10 
•14 


.04 


.01 
















'•25 

5-21 

3-40 
3.08 
3-94 
2.97 




.40 


.20 






.21 

.42 


.06 

.80 
•71 


.02 




.02 


Bluehill 








Brokenbow 




•25 
•19 

•45 

.90 






•14 


.10 




















•05 
.10 


"t 

'.'88 
.05 

t 
t 












•45 


•05 




.41 






.11 


•°9 


•25 










• 44 


.10 

•58 












t 

t 

t 

.06 

.20 

t 

•05 


.01 
•09 

t 


.06 
• 05 
.27 
•05 


.68 
•13 

•35 

•05 
.07 


.40 
.40 
















•75 


.20 
.02 


t 


•25 
■13 


t 
.02 

.05 


•23 

•05 
•15 
.10 


t 
.22 

•91 


t 

• 44 
.28 
.04 








2.75 
5- '9 
4.32 
2.71 


Columbus 


.40 


•17 




t 








.23 


























•56 


.01 








.01 
.02 






















.06 

.16 






. 10 
• °5 




.40 
•5° 


.04 
•15 


.04 


























2.72 










































•13 








■°3 






.22 






t 


.62 






•19 




.16 


2-74 


.46 


•°3 




t 


•07 








t 




.02 


4.67 


























• 45 
































t 
1.30 

1.63 
■30 
.67 

1.17 

•49 
•45 
•°5 

+ 
•45 

t 


.60 
.65 
■30 

1-5° 

2.26 
.16 
.36 

1.40 
•32 

.22 

•75 


1.48 

•05 
.01 
.28 
■05 
.20 
.20 
'•5° 


. 10 
.10 

•30 
•39 

t 

•25 
.20 

"t 

.40 
.02 


.08 

.10 

.04 

.16 

1.50 
•35 
•45 

•03 
•15 














.18 




2.89 


Ericson 




•35 
•50 
.20 
1.67 

•15 

2.70 

t 






.20 
•53 
■05 
•°9 

•31 
.06 
•5° 
1.02 
.10 


■5° 














t 


t 








.38 

t 

•53 
.36 
.04 

.36 
1.72 

.02 
.02 
•°5 
•50 
•03 
.26 
.03 


.10 

t 




•03 


•30 




3-9> 












.65 


.37 

.20 


• 42 

■30 

•'5 

. 12 

t 


•52 
•'5 
1-73 

•41 

.20 
.60 










•15 












.10 




•35 






•°5 














.30 




.07 

•75 
•25 


5- 96 


Fremont 

Geneva 

Genoa 


"+' 


1. 61 
. 11 
■25 
.40 
• °3 
t 

■25 
•35 
.16 
•03 

i.28 




t 

.18 






. 11 


•25 

t 

•07 

t 

.02 

.20 

t 


"t 

.06 

t 

•03 

t 


'.'18 
.12 
.60 
• 25 

t 


• 07 
.16 
.03 

•15 

"t" 
t 


.02 
.10 

"t 


•3° 

•74 

t 

•75 
2.70 


.21 
t 
.06 








t 






2-57 
5-55 
7.72 




t 








t 
















.20 


•05 








Grand Island 


■5° 


.48 


.10 














.02 


4-99 


t 














•55 

. 10 

t 


•33 

.04 
. 10 












2.13 


Hartington 

Harvard 


.29 
"t 


. 11 


2.85 
.07 




•33 




.06 




"f 


"+ 
"t 


•>3 
.06 

.07 
t 


.04 
.01 


• 13 
.26 


•03 

•05 


.56 

.... 


.26 
•90 
•38 


•34 
•49 
•25 


•74 
.06 
. 10 
.68 


.01 

■74 


■98 
. 12 


•°5 
•3° 
.60 
.28 


.90 
.01 
.36 






.28 


7.63 
2.98 
















2.26 










3.24 






































Hebron 




.22 




"t 


'.'56 


1. 00 
.80 


.09 




.10 






.10 




.16 




• 23 


•25 


•°5 


2.63 

1. 00 

t 

1. 00 


•33 
4.00 

t 
2.00 

• 75 


■17 
•17 

+ 


•03 

1. 00 
.04 

•23 
• 14 
•°3 

t 

t 
.70 

"t" 

.40 
.40 

t 


•03 


.04 


.07 




.02 










4.05 
7-25 










•°5 










+ 


. 10 




• 05 


.40 


•03 

•°5 
•48 


.02 
I. 00 

•03 
•04 

t 


t 


t 


.27 




















•5° 
















4-77 








.20 




.36 

t 













.18 




• 17 

•45 
.04 
t 




.06 


. 12 

t 

t 


•23 

.10 

t 


.02 

t 

•'3 
.24 
•30 
• 03 
1.27 
.48 
■ 24 


.16 








Kimball 






1.70 
.38 


•55 
•85 
.18 
.60 
•49 

1.02 
t 
.65 

.60 




















3-^7 

2 66 






t 

•03 
















■05 

t 


.06 


t 


.20 
•35 

.22 
.06 


•54 

•37 


.12 
•47 
t 

•23 
.10 
•44 
•75 
.80 














.41 








.06 


t 






• 49 

•23 
•90 
■23 
.10 


.02 

•03 
. 11 

•36 
•■9 

t 
.06 

1.27 


.02 




.01 
















.02 

•52 








• 31 

"t" 

■15 

.12 














t 
t 
•23 

t 


•29 

• 30 

• 17 


.04 
t 








•19 
1.02 
.18 




.02 






Lynch 




.21 

2.70 


t 


t 




..„ 


.16 






t 
t 


.18 
'I 5 


+ 
.22 

•49 


•13 

t 
•03 


. 11 
1.06 

•05 


3-96 

5-94 
5-93 


■'5 

•07 


t 




Madison 




•95 






















t 


"38 


.20 


2.00 


t 


t 


t 

.62 
.10 

t 




t 








t 


.20 


t 






.20 








3.00 
2 8? 


Minden 


.06 


.01 


•07 
•50 
■75 
.02 

•03 
•°3 
t 

.04 
•35 
•'9 
•03 


•25 

1-47 
•48 

.04 


.07 

.08 
•25 

•05 
2.30 
•30 
■78 
.20 
.80 


.86 

2.98 

3-68 

•58 

1.46 

.90 

.81 

1-25 

2.49 

• 41 

•75 

•40 


.22 


.09 
•°3 


.04 
.07 
. 11 
• 17 
•13 

.04 

.20 

t 

.01 
•50 


t 
. 10 








.01 

.01 

.06 

.08 

.28 

• 03 

• 15 


•14 
. 12 


•29 
•45 

• 04 
.06 
.16 


.06 




.08 
•'5 




6 08 
















6.71 

5-47 
8 30 
2 8i 


Norfolk 


•3° 


.20 

i'56 


3-3° 








.22 
• 30 

.64 

t 

.40 
1-33 

t 

t 


•07 


.01 








.02 
•75 
•35 
.02 
.07 
■ 40 
•03 
t 
•70 


.02 
.01 
.12 
.02 


1.60 

.12 

.08 


.11 
•42 

"I 6 


.08 

■05 


.85 
•72 
.18 
•09 






.01 




T 
t 

t 


.21 


•°5 




t 


North Platte 




.06 






"t 






.„. 

• 15 
. 10 






•7i 
.04 








3-58 
5-47 
5- 40 
4-45 
3-40 
4.61 








Odell 




.88 
■ 24 






t 
.02 


.... 

.04 




•23 
.26 


•15 

.22 

■3° 








Omaha 

O'Neill 




.22 
•92 












t 


t 


•51 
•50 


•14 


•03 


■52 
1.03 
•30 


.12 
•43 




t 














t 
■52 

t 










.20 
.20 


.27 
"t 
















•5° 




























1. 12 

.66 
.04 
• H 






.70 
1-35 
•15 










t 








•55 
•35 
.02 

•45 
2.15 
.24 
. 12 
.76 
t 

•47 
.20 

'.'76 

•55 
2.37 
■43 
.90 
2.50 

• 14 
.60 
■63 

• 40 


t 
■•55 
.60 

•77 
.90 

1. 17 
. 12 

i- '5 


•35 
•'5 
•07 


t 


• 40 






.20 


•17 
•15 
.06 










3-99 




















.65 

.04 






. 11 




•13 


•03 


Ravenna 








•07 


.12 












•05 
•57 
•45 

. 12 
■07 

t 


• 05 




■03 

•32 


.40 






.20 

.38 


.24 
•30 


. 10 


5- '3 




















2-94 
4-3° 












•5° 
































•23 
•23 








.08 


.20 

t 
1.30 










t 

.01 


.10 
.10 














•17 
.04 

•'5 


.36 

.10 
• 42 
.40 
•38 
.29 
•05 
.10 
.08 


.22 
.09 

•15 












•15 
•50 


•33 
•25 








.06 


•05 






.02 

. 10 


•35 
•05 

. 10 
.08 


"48 


.64 
•5° 






•39 
•55 


.12 


+ 






Schuyler 








5-95 


Seward 




.52 
.20 
•85 








•'9 




.04 


• 44 
.02 
.08 






..„ 


.02 




■30 


.22 

■ 70 
.82 

•65 
1. 00 

■ 75 
•33 
.60 

•25 
• 44 
•45 
.08 
'•75 
. 10 


.02 

.24 
.20 


.02 


.27 
•50 
•49 


•09 

• 44 
.27 
. 10 


. 11 

•03 
t 
•25 












3-59 
3-42 

4. 11 


1. 00 
.66 

.21 


•30 
.26 

t 








Springview 




2.32 








1. 17 






. II 


.08 
• 05 


.02 


















• 15 












.20 






.40 
•50 

t 




.20 

•25 
.40 
.22 
.20 


•90 
"t 








3->o 
4-79 
4.00 




t 


t 
•15 








t 
1-32 




t 

t 






•15 
.06 








.02 




Tekamah 














.26 
■15 

•50 
.04 
•35 
• 13 
■36 
.20 


.16 


■15 

t 
.04 


.02 








•17 
.20 
.... 


.84 










.70 
















.38 
t 

.10 
■47 










.08 


t 


.66 


.16 




t 


t 


t 

•30 

t 


•03 
.06 

.04 
.06 

•3° 
•°3 


.06 
.08 
•52 
•55 
.06 
1.60 
.40 


•05 
•38 


.08 


t 




4.89 
2.84 




. 10 
.20 


.08 




t 


.10 


.48 


■40 




1.64 
1.65 
.21 
1. 00 










4. 16 
5-74 
3-74 
5-65 










t 


.20 


1-39 
•5° 


•39 






t 
"f 


.12 

•25 


. 10 


.04 
.20 
.07 




•23 
.12 
.10 






•37 
•"5 
•50 


.04 
.06 
.20 












•36 






.10 


.02 

t 








t 






t 

.80 
• 05 


t 




•23 

•45 
. 12 


















Wisner 




. 10 








1.28 












t 


.10 


.08 




.08 




.65 


•35 


•34 






•73 




.20 


.07 




4.l8 





































































t Trace (when precipitation is less than 0.01 of an inch). 






U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. 



REPORT FOR JUNE, 1899. 



NEBRASKA SECTION 



OF THE 



CLIMATE AND CROP SERVICE 



OF THE 



WEATHER BUREAU. 



PUBLISHED BY AUTHORITY OF THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE. 



UNDER DIRECTION OF 

WILLIS L. MOORE 

CHIEF OF WEATHER BUREAU 
BY 

G. A. bOVEbA^D, 

SECTION DIRECTOR, 

Office, University of Nebraska, bincoli?. 




Natural History Lib 



rarv 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



June, 1899 



account of them is given elsewhere. The 30th was the only 
day of the month without an appreciable amount of rainfall 
in some portion of the State. 

Atmospheric pressure: The mean pressure was 29.90 inches, 
which is just the normal for June. The highest during the 
month was 80.28 inches, at Omaha on the 16th, and the 
lowest, 29.43 inches, at Valentine on the 3d. 

Temperature: The mean temperature for the State, as de- 
termined from the records of 101 stations, was 70.0°, which 
is about 0.4° above the average of the past twenty-four years. 
The highest temperature was 108°, at Beaver City on the 
18th, and the lowest, 28°, at Kennedy on the 23d. The 
mean daily range of temperature, as computed from the 
records of 54 stations, was 27.4°. The greatest range at any 
station was 57°, at Camp Clarke on the 19th, Kennedy on 
the 23d, and Imperial on the 18th. 

Wind: The prevailing direction of the wind was from the 
south. The average velocity was 10.1 miles an hour, which 
is 1.5 miles above the normal. The highest was 48 miles an 
hour, at North Platte on the 1st, from the southeast. 

Precipitation: The average precipitation for the State, as 
determined from the records of 145 stations, was 3.83 inches, 
which is 0.07 of an inch below the average of the past twenty- 
four years. The largest precipitation reported at any one 
station was 11.76 inches, at Tekamah, and the least, 0.80 of 
an inch, at Seneca. 

Corona : A corona was observed on the 9th. 

Fog : Fog occurred on the 8th and 25th. 

Hail: Hail fell on the 1st, 2d, 3d, 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th, 11th, 
12th, 13th, 15th, 16th, 18th, 22d, 23d, 24th, 25th, and 26th. 

Parhelia: Parhelia were reported on the 9th and 20th. 

Rainbows : Rainbows were reported on the 6th, 12th, 15th, 
22d, and 26th. 

Solar halos : Solar halos were observed on the 8th and 9th. 

Thunderstorms: Thunderstorms occurred on the 1st, 2d, 
3d, 4th, 5th, 6th, 8th, 11th, 12th, 13th, 14th, 16th, 17th, 18th, 
19th, 20th, 21st, 22d, 23d, 24th, 25th, 26th, 27th, and 28th. 

Barometer, -wind, and humidity table. 





Barometer. 


Wind. 


Humidity. 


Stations. 




43 

re 

.- 
D 




re 

O 
i-l 




9 

> 

S c 


< 


Maximum 
, velocity. 


ca 
S 



►J 






re 


6 
it 

s 


6 
Q 


■V 

"r. 

a 


Lincoln 

North Platte . 


29.92 

29.89 
29.92 
29.88 


30-27 
30.26 
30.28 
30.24 


16 
15 
16 

15 


29.50 
29-47 
29.50 

29-43 


12 

5 

12 

3 


7,942 
7,281 
6,236 

8,120* 


11. 

10. 1 

8.7 
i'-5 


45 
48 
36 

42 


s. 
se. 
sw. 
w. 


2 
1 

2 

3 


73 

63 

74 


37 
'5 
43 


18 
17 
18 











* Twelve hours' record missing. 
Means for the six equal sections of the State. 





Temperature. 


Precipitation. 


Number of days- 


Sections. 


Mean. 


Aver- 
age.* 


Mean. 


Aver- 
age.t 


Rainy. 


Clear. 


Partly 
cloudy. 


Cloudy. 


Southeastern 

Northeastern 


73- ' 

70.4 
70.6 
72.4 
67.0 
66.3 

70.0 


71.8 
70.2 
70.0 
72.2 
67.8 
66.9 

69.8 


5-43 
4.23 
5-34 
3-8o 
1.83 
2-35 
3-83 


5.02 
4.68 
4.17 
3.38 
2-35 
1.63 

3-54 


8.7 
8.1 
10.7 
8.0 
6.6 
7-5 
8.3 


11.4 
"■5 
12.6 

"2-3 
13.8 

14.4 

12.7 


13- 1 

13-4 
11. 6 
13-4 
13-4 
10.9 

12.6 


5-5 
5-o 
5-6 
4-3 
2.9 
4-8 

4-7 




State 





* For ten years. 



t For twenty years. 



COMPARISON OF PAST JUNES. 

The monthly maximum and minimum temperatures for several sta- 
tions have been obtained for the years 187(5 to 1888, and the following 
table has been revised, and differs slightly from the comparative tables 
previously published : 



Years. 



1876 

1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
.885 
1886 
(887 



Temperature. 


Pre- 








cipita- 
tion. 








Mean. 


Max. 


Min. 


70. 1 


IOI 


33 


1.99 


66.3 


95 


34 


3-5° 


66.3 


92 


45 


5-19 


70.0 


98 


38 


4-27 


69.0 


97 


42 


4-44 


72.9 


98 


49 


5-36 


69.0 


93 


38 


4-34 


68.4 


106 


40 


7.18 


71.8 


97 


45 


2.04 


68.6 


94 


35 


3-66 


69.4 


99 


33 


2.96 


72.0 


99 


39 


3.22 


70.1 


103 


3» 


3-'I 


68.7 


104 


37 


3-55 



Years. 



1890 

1891 

1892 

1893 

1894 

1895 

1896 

1897 

1898 

'899 

Average for 
the past 24 
years 



Temperature. 



Mean. Max. Min. 



72.4 
66.0 
68.4 
7'-7 
71.4 
67.6 
70.7 

°9-5 
70.4 
70.0 



69.6 



1 '3 

>"5 
112 
110 
'°5 
1^6 
109 
108 



36 



Pre- 
cipita- 
tion. 



3- 63 

7.. .7 
2.18 
3. 10 

3-19 
4.67 
4.04 
3.60 
3-54 
3-83 



Climatolog-ical data— supplemental table. 



Sections and 
stations. 



a c 



a § 

eg V 



Northeastern. 

Bellevue 

Ewing 

Hubbard 

Lyons 

Monroe 

Schuyler 

Sioux City, Iowa 

Wisner 

Yankton, S. Dak 

Southeastern. 

Benedict 

Bradshaw 

Burchard 

Chester 

Clatonia 

Eden 

Fairfield 

Fairmont 

Hickman 

McCoolJunct. . . 

Marquette 

Nemaha 

Odell 

Osceola 

Palmyra 

Plattsmouth — 
Pleasanthill — 

Salem 

State Farm 

Strang 

Syracuse 

Tablerock 

Valparaiso 

Wilber 

Central. 

Burwell 

Elba 

Greeley 

Palmer 

St.Libory 

Southwestern. 

Bartley 

Culbertson 

Hayes Center... 

Ough 

Oxford 

Sargent 

Stratton 

Wallace 

Wauneta 

Wellfleet 

Western. 

Paxton 

Thedford 

Willard 

Northwestern. 

Bassett 

Cody 

Gordon 

Johnstown 

Merriman 

Spragg 



70.0 
70. 2 



75-2 



70.8 
70.2 



73-0 
75-2 



71-5 
79-2 
77-3 
77.0 



75- ° 
73-6 
71.0 



72. 1 



78.3 



69. r 



Precipitation, in 
inches. 



c 

E- 



7.42 
4-53 
4. 10 
6. 14 
3-55 
6.06 
4.76 
5-°5 
2-5' 

6.70 
8.47 
4.18 
9.62 
6-39 
3-46 
4-5° 
6. 10 
3-92 
5- 18 
4.08 
2.68 
5.80 
5-73 
4.83 
5-26 
7-53 
2.00 



5- 'i 
2.87 
5-43 
9.^3 
5-99 

3-93 
4-3' 

3-95 
4-45 
5-3° 

3.36 
3-61' 
1-52 
1.69 



£ ca 

e<5 



+3.65 


II 


+ 


89 


9 
13 
12 


+ 


67 






ifi 



+0.63 

+0.91 
—0.31 
—1.47 



+0.52 
+2.18 



— 0.29 

+0.44 

+ 2. 16 
+ O.76 
+ 1.22 

— 0. 17 
—'■25 
+ 1.25 
+ I-53 
+ 0.83 

— O. OI 



—0.83 



3.86 

3.02 
2.63 
2.80 



3-29 
2.57 

1.7" 

3-57 
1.65 
1.80 
1.90 
1. 00 
3-77 



— 1.80 
—0.36 



+ Q-95 

+0.46 
—0.58 
—3- 80 
+0.49 
+ 0.66 



— o. 16 
—2.00 
— 1.48 



—0.03 
+0.03 
—0-59 



+ 0.47 



Number of 
days— 





t*. 




■C 












O 








O 




>> 










X 


C8 


L, 


X 







16 . 



sw. 

s. 

se. 



nw. 
sw. 



se. 
se. 



Observers. 



E.F.StoufTer. 
G. H.Benson. 
M.M. Beacom. 
N.R.Kellam. 
Wm. Webster. 
L.N.Dickinson. 
Weather Bureau, 
(ieo. W. Howe. 
Weather Bureau. 

R.B. Brabham. 
E.C.Koggy. 
.T. A. Kinsey. 
W.J.Kissick. 
F.W.Jones. 
D. .J.Wood. 
M. 1... I ones. 
G.H.Borden. 
O.O.Franklin. 

F. E. Porter. 
John Ellis. 
R.J. Duff. 

I. B. Huffman. 

G. W.Murbarger. 
W.D. Bancroft. 
W.Z.Pickett. 

J. W. Ingles 

W.W.McDermet. 

S.W.Perin. 

S.Diller. 

L.Howell. 

S.H.Dopp. 

W.J.Craven. 

S.E.Davis. 

W.S.Green. 
S.M.Wellman. 
J. A.Pinkerton. 
E. II. Smith. 
W.I.Meader. 

R.S.Baker. 

Mrs.L.A.Wibley. 

R.C.Orr. 

Win. Ough. 

Dr. L.M.Brady. 

J.S.Spooner. 

C. W.Shurtliff. 

H.S.Toogood. 

J.W.Haiin. 

Wm.G. Hawkins. 

Frank N. Pearl. 
B. A. Harrow. 
Wesley VV. Lewis. 

AH. Gale. 
W.E.Pontius. 
Amos Burwell. 
F.Avery. 
F. Hussong. 
8. \V. Spragg. 



\ p , etc., indicate number of days missing from record. 






June, 1899. 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



Climatolog'ical data for Nebraska, June, 1899. 



Stations. 



Northeastern Sec. 

Agee * 

Blair 

Columbus 

Creighton 

Fremont 

Hartington 

Hooper * 

Lynch* 

Madison 

Norfolk 

Oakdale 

Omaha 

O'Neill 

San tee Agency 

Stanton* 

Tekamah 

Wakefield 

Westpoint 

Southeastern Sec. 

Arborville* 

Ashland 

Auburn * 

Aurora * 

Beatrice 

Crete 

David City 

Dawson * 

Edgar * 

Fairbury 

Geneva 

Harvard 

Hebron 

Lincoln- 

Nebraska City 

Kulo * 

Seward * 

Superior* 

Tecumseh 

Turlington 

Weepingwater* 

VV y more * 

York* 

Central Sec. 

Albion 

Ansley 

Ashton* 

Brokenbow* 

Callaway 

Central City* 

Dunning* 

Ericson* 

Genoa 

Gothenburg 

Grand Island 

Kearney* 

Lexington 

Loup* 

North Loup 

Ord * 

Ravenna 

St. Paul* 

Southwestern Sec 

Alma 

Arapahoe * 

Beaver City 

Benkelman* 

Bluehill* 

Curtis 

Franklin 

Haigler* 

Hastings* 

Holdrege * 

Imperial 

McCook * 

Madrid* 

Minden 

Redcloud * 

Republican* 

Wilsonville 

Western Sec 

Camp Clarke 

Gering 

Kimball 

Lodgepole 

Nesbit 

North Platte 

Seneca* 

Whitman* 

Northwestern Sec 

Alliance * 

Fort Robinson 

Hay Springs 

Kennedy 

Kirkwood * 

Springview 

Valentine 



Counties. 



Holt 

Washington. 

Platte 

Knox 

Dodge 

Cedar 

Hooper 

Boyd 

Madison 

...do 

Antelope 

Douglas 

Holt 

Knox 

Stanton 

Burt 

Dixon 

Cuming 



York 

Saunders — 

Nemaha 

Hamilton ... 

Gage 

Saline 

Butler 

Richardson . 

Clay 

Jefferson 

Fillmore 

Clay 

Thayer 

Lancaster... 

Otoe 

Richardson . 

Seward 

Nuckolls 

Johnson 

Otoe 

Cass 

Gage 

York 



Boone 

Custer 

Sherman — 

Custer 

...do 

Merrick 

Blaine 

Wheeler 

Platte 

Dawson 

Hall 

Buffalo 

Dawson 

Sherman 

Valley 

...do 

Buffalo 

Howard 



Harlan 

Furnas 

...do 

Dundy 

Webster 

Frontier 

Franklin 

Dundy 

Adams 

Phelps 

Chase 

Red Willow. 

Perkins 

Kearney 

Webster 

Harlan 

Furnas 



Cheyenne ... 
Scotts Bluff. 

Kimball 

Cheyenne ... 

Logan 

Lincoln 

Thomas 

Grant 



Box Butte . 

Dawes 

Sheridan . . . 

Cherry 

Rock 

Keya Paha . 
Cherry 



1,442 
i, 600 
1,203 
1,309 



1,585 
1,532 
1,722 

1, i°3 

1,975 



1,472 
1,060 
',387 
1,313 



1,100 

1,051 

1,792 
1.235 
1,368 
1,619 

945 
1,722 
1,316 
1,633 
1,812 
1,458 
1,199 
941 
842 
1,435 
1,574 
1,113 
1,214 
1,080 
1,222 
1,642 

i,747 
2,3°7 
2,061 

2,477 
2,555 
1,708 
2,621 
2,029 
1,584 
2, 557 
1,860 
2,146 
2,385 
2,067 
1,961 



2,028 
1,796 

1,939 
2,173 
2,147 
2,968 
1,967 
2,553 
1,820 
3,256 
1,932 
2,324 
3,278 
2,506 

3,294 
2,169 
1,687 
1,939 
2,298 

3,700 



4,697 
3,820 



2,841 
2 ,97i 
3,588 

3,968 
3,764 
3,821 



Temperature, in degrees Fahrenheit. 



2,613 



69. 1 
70.4 
70.6 
69.7 
70.2 
68.5 
71.9 
70.9 
69.4 
69.9 
70.0 
72.1 
68.4 
72.2 
70.8 
70.7 
69.4 
72.4 

72.4 
72.0 
73-o 
71.7 
71.8 



72.9 
74-4 
77.6 
71.8 
73-4 
71.0 

71.7 
72.0 
68. 5 1 
77-4 
71.6 
75- o 
73-6 
72.2 
70.1 
74.1 
73-6 

69.2 
69.2 
72.0 
68.7 
66.0 
72.8 
63.8 
72.6 
71.2 
68.9 
68.2 
74.8 
69. 1 
68.6 

75-5 
69.2 
70.0 
72.1 

73-2 

73-4 
72.3 
69.6 
72.8 
66.8 
72.08 



71.8 



71.9 
72.4 
73-4 
70.8 
70.0 
75-5 
74-9 

67.7 
66.2 
64.2 
67.4 
67-3 
68.4 
65.7 



64.6 
63.0 
63-7 
65-9 
68.8 
67.6 
67.9 



8 



—0.8 

+ i."i' 

+1.6 

—0.6 

0.0 



+0.4 
+0.6 
+ 1.7 
+0.9 
+0.6 
+0.3 
—0.4 
+ 1.0 
—0.3 



+ 1.1 
—0.8 
+0.3 
— 2. 1 
—0.2 



+4.0 
++3' 



+0.9 
+0.1 
+ 1.0 
+ 1.0 
-2.3 



—2-3 
+3-2 
+ 0.4 
—0.6 
+ 0.6 



—0.4 

—0.4 
+0.2 
+ 1.1 
—3-7 
—2.4 

— 1.2 
-4.6 
— 0.2 
+ 1.0 

— 1.2 

— 2.8 

+ 1.0 
+ 1.0 



+ 5-2 

+0.9 



+ 1.2 

—O.S 
+ 0.7 

—4-3 
+0.6 



+ 1-3 



+ 1.0 

—0.7 

+ 1.5 

0.0 

+ 1.1 



+ 1-5 



—0.6 

— 1-7 
+ 0.5 
—0.8 
+0.4 
—2.9 



—1.6 
—3-1 
—0.7 
—1.4 



—0.8 
+0.7 



95 



8t 



6t 



55 



Precipitation, in inches. 



4.40 
10.55 
5.80 
4.67 
10.17 
7.68 
9.62 
3-23 
5-46 
4.41 
5-42 
5-77 
4.17 
3-97 
5-89 
11.76 
3.20 
5.00 

6.01 
10.65 
3-31 
4.66 

3-74 



6.05 
3-24 
5-57 
4-30 
6.04 
3-85 
7-33 
8-39 
2.89 
3-05 
8.80 
5.6i 
2.43 
3-49 
8.42 
4.71 
6.12 

6.13 
5-67 
4-38 
4-47 
5.65 
6-73 



4-95 
4-25 
2.16 
7.02 
7-93 
4.12 
8.20 
5-58 
3.60 
8.91 
5-32 

3-53 



2.86 
0.90 
7-47 
3-24 
5-6i 
3-23 
4-55 



4.22 
2.28 
1-73 
9.61 
7-05 
5-37 
3.00 

1-53 
i-77 
1.06 
1.40 
2.18 
1-95 
0.80 



1-30 
1.80 
1-97 
3-47 
3-19 
2.64 
2.69 



a 

SO «3 

o 



+ 1.02 
+ 5-29 
+ 1.28 
+ 0.57 
+ 5-36 
+ 2.99 



—0.l6 
+ O.85 
—0.03 
+ I.07 
+ 0.10 

—0.23 

+0.26 

+ 1-97 
+6.11 
—2.28 
+0.76 

+ 1-34 
+ 5-8i 
—0.68 
—0.84 
—0.26 



+ 1.26 
—0.68 
+0.76 
— 0.20 
+0.22 
—0-33 
+ 2.54 
+ 3-92 
—1.99 
—0.99 
+4-31 
+ 1.40 
— 2.40 
—0.20 
+3-51 



+ 1-75 

+ 1.66 
+ 1.64 
+0.30 
—0.74 
+ 1. 12 
+ 2.68 



+ 1.38 
— o. 11 
— 2.00 
+ 1.02 
+ 3-97 
— 0.60 
+ 0.44 
+ 0.82 
— 1.20 
+4.88 
—0-33 

—0.78 



— 1.80 
—2-13 
+ 1.31 

— 1. 16 
+ 1.74 
+ 0.13 
+ 0.20 



+ 0.83 
—1.41 
—1.62 
+4.21 
+ 1-73 
+ 1.24 
—0.75 



-0.83 
— 1. 00 
— 0.60 
— 0.61 

— 1.29 

— 1.86 



— 1.47 
— 1. 01 
—0.89 
—0.53 
—0.83 
—0.68 
— 0.61 



4.21 
1.87 
2.00 
2.68 
3.68 
4-5° 
0.97 
1-75 
1. 10 
1.83 
1.56 
1.20 
2.00 
1. 61 
5.00 
0.79 
1.30 

1.50 
2.25 
0.98 
1. 19 
1-32 



1-75 
1-13 
1.20 

1-45 
1.99 
0.69 
2.74 
2.40 
0.84 
0-95 
2.32 
1.3° 
1. 00 

1-35 
2.36 
2.17 
'• 15 

1.72 
1.58 
1.08 
1.20 

1.30 
2.02 



2.70 
0.87 
0-57 
2-37 
4.60 
2.45 
2.38 
2.50 
1.87 
4.00 
1.02 

1.26 



o.57 
0.50 
3.65 
o.93 
1.42 
0.82 
1.58 



1.80 
0.70 
0.86 
4.00 

1-55 
1.80 
1.20 

0.73 
0.63 
0.44 
0.50 
0.90 

0.74 
0.70 



0.40 
0.60 
0.70 
1. 10 
o.73 
0.80 
0.72 



Is, 



0.0 
0.0 



a 
»-& 

.QXJ 

a 

3 



Sky. 



s 






S"0 

1° 



a 
3 






sw. 
se. 



s. 

se. 

se. 



se. 
se. 
sw. 
se. 



s. 
sw. 

s. 



nw. 

s. 



sw. 
se. 



sw. 
sw. 



nw. 
s. 

nw. 
s. 

s. 



sw. 

se. 

s. 

ne. 

se. 

se. 

nw. 

s. 

s. 



nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

w. 

se. 

s. 

nw. 



nw. 

sw. 

se. 

nw. 

se. 

nw. 

w. 



Observers. 



R.E.Bowden. 

E. A. Palmer. 
C.C.Gray. 

Dr. Geo. Roberts. 

Wm. J. Phillips. 

T. B.A.Watson. 

T.W.Lyman. 

C.C.Irwin. 

Dr. F.A.Long. 

Dr. P. H.Salter. 

G.S.Clingman. 

U. S. Weather Bureau. 

Chas. N.Cole. 

W.H.Hamlin. 

W.Gerecke. 

Dr. A. D. Nesbit. 

I. H. Weaver. 

C.J.Kadish. 

E.D.Smith. 

Dr.A.S. vMansfelde. 

G.D.Carrington. 

H.C.Miller. 

A. C. Zimmerman. 

Doane College. 

J. K.Townsend. 

M.L.Libbee. 

L.L. Fuller. 

W.F.Cramb. 

F.M.Flory. 

Dr. J. T.Fleming. 

Dr.C.M.Easton. 

U. S. Weather Bureau. 

E.Morton. 

W.F.Gingrich. 

L.E.Ost. 

L.W.Hahn. 

C.M.Miller. 

Wm.N. Hunter. 

G. Treat. 

H.B.Ware. 

O.P.Lowry. 

F. A.Pettinger. 
Chas. R. Hare. 
F. Rein. 

H. L.Ormsby. 

Geo.B.Mair. 

J.A.McRae. 

L.L. \\ illiams. 

A.Dahl. 

Geo. S.Truman. 

A.V.Carlson. 

E.Corbin. 

C. E. Magner. 

Ira P.Griswold. 

E.S.Hayhurst. 

J.E.Goodrich. 

Jas. Milford. 

Erastus Smith. 

Paul Anderson. 

R.E. Pitcher. 
J F.Edwards. 
C.G.George. 
W.F. Winger. 
C.S. Draper. 
Dr. S.R. Razee. 
F.T.Owen. 
T.P.F.Haine. 
J.C.Swarts. 

C. Engstrom. 
Robert Malcolm. 
C.T.Watson. 
John McKenzie. 
Joel Hull. 
A.Conoven. 
W.Bardon. 

D. F. Hostetter. 

Robt.H. Willis. 
J.P.Finley. 
F.J. Bellows. 
A.B.Persinger. 
Grant E.Bolkcom. 
U. S. Weather Bureau. 
F.D.Gallup, 
D.McNall. 

J.Kridelbaugh. 
Post surgeon. 
C. A. Waterman. 
D.A.Piercy. 
Mrs.C. Arter. 
Miss Ezada Phelps. 
U.S. Weather Bureau. 



* Temperature data from thermometers not self registering. t Occurred on more than one day. », b , °, etc., indicate number of days missing from observed readings 
All records are used in determining State or district means, but State and district departures are determined by comparison of current data ot only stations with normals. 






CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



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3«« 



June, 1899. 



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CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



June, 1899. 



Daily precipitation for Nebraska, June, 1899. 



Stations. 


Day of month. 




i. 


2. 


3- 


4- 


5- 


6. 


7- 


8. 


9- 


10. 


11. 


12. 


13- 


14. 


15- 


16. 


'7- 


18. 


'9- 


20. 


21. 


22. 


23. 


24- 


25- 


26. 


V- 


28. 


29. 


3°- 


3'- 


3 





.80 




t 


.02 


'.'48 


t 
•57 




•13 










.24 
1. 00 

'•'78 
•25 
1.40 
'■37 


.20 

t 


t 
.07 


t 
•37 










.09 

.10 


■45 


1.29 


t 

•32 
•3° 
.66 
.68 
•42 


1.48 
.16 


■35 












4.40 
6.13 
1.30 

3-53 
5.67 


















.69 

.40 


1.72 














.40 
t 

•35 
•75 






t 

"38 

• 72 
•03 

.62 

.06 


.10 
•'9 








. 10 






t 






.21 

•35 

1. 21 

20 

.22 


.16 




.08 
t 

•23 
:-94 
.04 


















1.06 
.24 
1.50 
2.23 
•13 
.60 
.21 

• 41 
•57 
. 10 
1.62 
.12 


•19 

.02 
.29 
.18 

i'.6 3 


1.26 

1.58 


•29 

•5° 

t 

1.05 














t 








• 44 


■53 

1-32 

•'3 
•5° 
.48 

. 10 
•54 


•°3 








1.22 




t 














.18 
. 11 
.98 

.06 

•15 
.02 
.08 
. 12 














.68 

.41 
■72 
•53 






















•'9 

.07 




+ 






■ 42 










10.65 
3-3i 
4.66 
3.36 
3-57 
3-74 
























.28 


.11 


t 


.06 


1.19 
•33 
• 03 


■°5 






.21 




•'5 
•37 


•°3 
1.63 
•17 


.10 
. II 
■59 
























liassett 


. 10 


•74 


.36 
1.32 

t 


•3' 
•'5 




.02 
.85 
t 


• C7 


t 






.18 




.01 














■3° 

•27 












•°5 




• 07 




.16 
•50 
3.10 
•98 
.26 












+ 




.66 

+ 
•34 


• 41 
I 3 


•'5 
1.20 


•56 


































0.90 
'0-55 
7-47 
4-47 








.68 


•30 




.58 


1-95 

t 










1. 11 
. 10 


t 


• 17 

t 


.40 






.01 


.22 

•°9 


•56 
•33 


•54 
.56 


.01 












.80 


'.'65 








3-65 
■ 42 










•33 




•°5 








.70 
















































.40 






.10 
















. 10 
• 3° 
■05 
•75 
.09 


•'3 


"t 


•3° 








.62 

•73 
■19 


"f 

.07 


.09 

. 12 


.40 

t 
•24 


.60 

.40 

■'9 
2.00 


■05 
1. 10 


'•30 


1-54 










3-93 

5.65 
1-53 
5.80 
4.67 


Callaway 


.60 






.40 








.70 






.85 






+ 




•15 


'.'16 


•13 
• 17 




























.40 




•45 


.63 


.06 


t 








.82 


•°3 


.29 


.46 




.02 

•°5 


•55 


.06 


1.87 
•57 
















•3° 












































t 






















.56 
•'3 
■95 












1.50 


..,. 


.40 
.70 


.60 

• 5° 

• °3 


. 10 
■25 

. 12 


"63 

■30 


•13 
■93 
.20 


.72 












3-6i 
3-24 
6.05 
3.24 














. 10 
.06 


■45 
■•'3 


•3° 
























■65 
.56 






'•75 
t 






•25 


.„. 


•15 












•65 
•5" 














.42 


.41 






t 






















































•75 


.12 


1. 00 






t 
t 


.22 








. 10 
.18 
•5° 
.60 


MS 

•15 
















1.20 


•°5 

•77 
. 12 


. 10 


■55 


•27 
■3° 


•73 
2.70 










5- 57 
4-95 
4-3° 
1.80 

5-6l 
10. 17 
6.04 
4-25 
'•77 
2.16 
7.02 
3-95 
3-23 
7.68 
3.85 
4-55 
1-52 
'•97 
7-33 
















.48 






t 


. 10 


t 
•50 














1-43 
.40 






1-45 
























.20 
•45 
.68 
















.40 






.10 
















•3° 

"+' 

.02 
1.07 


.10 
•05 


.18 






I. 00 

• 52 














1. 00 

■ 41 
t 
.87 

t 
2.37 
•35 
.60 
.01 
• 44 
.80 


•3° 


.41 




1.42 
.56 
.83 
t 


•45 
•34 








1. 00 
1.99 

•23 






2.25 

I. eg 

•38 

t 






•°3 

.18 
•34 


2.68 
.62 
.63 
.07 
•23 
•9' 

1. 00 
• 44 
•4' 
•5° 
.80 


•°5 


1.32 




t 




■ 14 


.22 

1-43 
•°5 

t 

.02 
■05 

t 
•35 

• 14 
































f 


.... 




"+' 








•3° 


• 34 


.07 


•05 


'•63 

•55 


•25 
• 27 

•35 

•05 


•23 

.... 

.68 
•23 


•30 
•39 
t 

•3* 
•75 
•17 
.68 
.02 
.08 
•'5 
.02 

•'5 


.07 


.64 


.01 


















.02 

.01 


'.'46 
.25 

• 15 

•37 


t 


.02 
.20 

• 17 
.02 

•°5 


"t" 




■57 
■31 
•15 


.18 
.„. 














"t" 


•'3 
t 


.02 


.20 


•31 








t 


.67 
1. 00 
























.82 
.96 
























■ V 
• 42 
.27 


.18 


.01 


•23 


.14 




.02 






'.'69 


.09 








•05 
• 44 


3-68 
.46 
•92 
•5" 
.07 

•'9 


•95 












•°5 
















•55 




■25 

t 
.06 




"t 










.10 


.66 












.08 






















.18 


.06 
1.63 




t 


t 
2.74 


. 12 


t 




.70 










t 


.01 


■ 7° 




.16 








t 








■57 








1. 12 


















































•50 

1-39 
t 

•03 
.60 
•32 

•3° 










.16 




.12 






•'5 
•3° 

"t 

•'5 
.46 

t 

. 11 
•57 
1-75 


•3° 


t 










•05 


.22 

•15 
• °3 
.c8 
.72 

•°3 
.40 
.28 

t 

+ 

t 


•°5 
.90 

'.'oS 
2.40 

'.'38 
t 

•49 
.60 

.20 
1.02 
.22 
•15 

•24 

.04 
•07 
. 10 
1. 13 

.92 


•39 

1. 10 
t 

.29 
.02 
•25 

'•15 
•3° 
.06 

.14 
•3° 

t 

•35 
.02 

•°3 
•°3 
•73 

i-°5 

■5° 

t 

1.20 

"00 

•55 
1. 10 
•45 

•45 
•5° 


1.80 
•25 
•05 

.38 

•34 


t 

4.60 

•15 

2.45 

1.79 
•97 
t 
•03 


•93 

•49 

. 11 
.26 
•50 
2.38 
■79 

'.'86 
















•13 






.80 










4.22 

7-93 






.87 

• 44 
.01 
.83 

t 

.07 
.22 

• 41 
.07 


•25 

t 
•05 




t 


■23 






.10 




•; 5 
•25 




.16 

t 
.01 


•05 

t 

..„ 














t 






t 




3-47 
1.06 
4.12 
8-39 
1.40 
8.20 
3-23 
6. 14 
5- 46 
'■73 
1. 00 
9.61 
2. 89 
2.68 
2.18 
4 4' 
5-58 
1-95 
5-42 
5- 80 
5-77 
4.17 
5-73 
1.69 
4-45 
5-26 
8.91 
7-°5 
3-05 
' 5- 32 
3-97 
































1.22 


.02 


t 








1. 00 




t 






•75 












•25 


t 


















.36 
if 


".'18 


•05 

t 
.96 
.27 




•17 
.10 
t 
.08 






•52 


•25 

•13 
• 17 
.20 

t 

■ 24 


.08 

.61 

.29 


-38 
t 






■3' 














• 14 


t 

.28 
.88 
















.11 


1.96 






■ 24 


.80 
•23 














































t 
.06 














t 


t 


•5° 
.27 

.46 








t 
t 
















.01 


.20 
t 


•23 

■34 
.80 




•14 
■84 
•13 




.02 

■'3 
r.oo 
.90 








.04 
.11 
.21 




t 




•'5 


.10 


4.00 


3-57 




















































•37 










Nesbit 


•5° 














.09 

.70 
•3' 
.46 
•4' 


.04 
•33 


■ '7 




•03 


t 
'■65 


.06 

•34 
t 

•74 
•36 


'.'38 
t 
.01 


• 14 
1. 10 

.10 

.10 


.16 

.22 


.22 

t 

2.50 

.16 

• 40 
.96 
•58 










Norfolk 


•°3 


.09 


.17 


•25 




•32 


t 








.09 


.06 


.83 

.04 
1. 18 
•98 

• 44 


















.78 




.06 






North Platte.. . 


t 


t 
.04 










.07 
.02 
.28 
t 

•15 
• 5° 








• 14 

.20 
•5° 

t 


'.'18 


.04 
t 








1.90 
.76 
.01 
•33 


• 05 


.81 


1.02 


1.03 
t 

.18 

. 10 
.20 


.72 






t 






t 










Odell 








.22 




t 


.28 

t 
•5° 








1.56 
t 
•85 


"t 


•13 
.20 






t 
.02 


.01 


•35 
+ 


...» 








O'Neill 


•94 








•24 
1.40 


.90 
•45 
•30 
.22 
.20 

•75 

•35 
.24 


.04 
.20 




















Ough 






•43 


.18 
































.10 


.60 


• 13 

• 25 

■45 




.22 

. 12 

■5° 




1.20 


.40 
1.20 
.85 
.90 

•37 
•25 

2.67 


■25 

.90 

•3° 


•05 
"t 


.06 
t 

.04 

t 






.36 




.62 


.40 
•5° 
.20 
■25 
•59 


t 


•5° 






















1. 00 
















•53 
.20 
■95 
•25 
.c8 


•5° 
.40 






1. 00 


•15 




•50 




. 10 


4.00 

'.'67 

2.00 


• 41 
1-55 

.42 
















.80 
•35 
.04 

•15 


.60 
•15 










Rulo 


•5° 
.07 

■°3 


.27 
•27 
•°5 

2.02 






1.02 






•34 


•07 
t 










St Paul . . 


.56 


.10 


•38 
•23 
.90 














.66 
•83 

•70 




























.60 
■05 
•25 

•5° 
.18 
.04 

•54 


.10 




























t 
































2.32 




.40 


.20 






1.89 
.04 


•73 

.10 
1. 61 














.81 

t 








■58 
.90 










8 80 




.20 


.08 


•°3 
•57 






.20 








•57 


■19 

.82 


.85 

.80 

■15 
.07 

1.40 
.01 
■72 

.02 


1.27 
•3° 
.11 


•5° 
•38 












3-77 
2.64 
5.89 
5.61 
2.43 
1 1 . 76 
2-57 
3-49 
2.69 

9-03 
3.20 
8.42 
5.00 


























.80 










.02 






.36 

I. OO 














.18 
.80 
•3° 
1.65 


t 


•19 








.58 


•94 

'.'56 

•75 




Superior 




1-25 
1. 00 






•43 
2.62 


•°5 

•15 


'.'64 














1.30 








■13 

t 
.60 

. 10 
.10 
• '7 

. 10 
























•25 


.09 
.20 
.16 












5.00 




•35 






. 10 












Thedford .. 




.48 
.26 
.18 

1 S 

■°3 

t 






















•39 
.04 


.96 
•54 
1.02 
•°7 

I. 12 
.21 


t 


■°5 

t 

2.46 

•47 
•9' 


"08 

. 12 
.10 


t 


t 




.uS 
I.23 


.46 
.04 
1. 12 
.69 
1.24 
1.30 


•°5 
.01 

.09 

■ 42 


.01 
.06 








'.'is 


•34 
.10 
. 10 
.08 


•■7 

1.90 
.06 

1.80 
•5° 


+ 
.20 

•79 
.10 


. IO 
•°5 

t 


• 07 
.16 
•75 

2.36 
.10 


• 72 












t 


















Wakefield 




•°3 

•75 
t 








■09 
.12 

•5° 








■ 03 


.42 
■ 44 
























t 














.98 




.20 


t 










































. 12 
.98 






.66 
•93 




.02 

.48 






■•15 


'•39 
.28 


•'7 


•°5 
■47 


.61 






•49 






■34 
.38 


•95 


.58 


.02 
.18 


.60 














5-"5 
6.12 


York 




•32 







































* Record missing from 5th to 12th, inclusive. 



t Trace (when precipitation is less than 0.01 of an inch). 



M 7 



Lfl v 
UNIVERSITY of ILLINOIS. 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. 



REPORT FOR JULY. 1899. 



NEBRASKA SECTION 



OF THE 



CLIMATE AND CROP SERVICE 



OF THE 



WEATHER BUREAU. 



PUBLISHED BY AUTHORITY OF THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE. 



UNDER DIRECTION OF 

WILLIS L. MOORE 

CHIEF OF WEATHER BUREAU 



BY 

G. A. hOVEUAlMD, 

SECTION DIRECTOR, 

Office, University of Nebraska, Lincoln. 




Waiurj 



I 



oo 



P 



en 
Q 






eu 

Q 
55 
<! 

M 

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55 
O 




July, 1899. 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



3 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, 

Climate and Crop Service 

OK THE 

WEATHER BUREAU. 

CENTRAL OFFICE: WASHINGTON, D. C. 



NEBRASKA SECTION. 

G. A. LOVELAND, Section Director, 

LINCOLN, NEIiK. 



Vol. IV. 



LINCOLN, NEBR. 



No. 7. 



CROP CONDITIONS. 

The first half of July was exceedingly favorable for all 
growing crops. The temperature was slightly below normal 
and the rainfall generous and well distributed, making al- 
most perfect climatic conditions. Oats improved rapidly. 
The growth in many places was so rank that some slight 
damage resulted from lodging and rust. At the end of the 
period oats were ripening, with every prospect of a large crop. 
Winter wheat filled and ripened well and much of the crop 
was harvested before the middle of July, and some thrash- 
ing was done. The quality of winter wheat is good, but the 
acreage is small, and the yield is generally below average and 
in many places very light. However, the crop is much bet- 
ter than expected before the harvest was commenced. Corn 
grew rapidly, and was generally laid by free of weeds, with 
an unusually good stand. Probably the corn crop of Ne- 
braska never promised better than on the 15th of this month. 
Potatoes also gave promise of a very large crop. 

The next ten days, from the 17th to the 26th, were dry, 
with only a very few scattered showers in the State. The 
temperature, however, was below normal, and while corn did 
not grow as fast as it would have done under more favorable 
conditions generally no permanent damage was done to the 
crop. In a few localities it was injured during this dry 
period. This was an excellent period for harvesting, haying, 
and thrashing. Harvesting was nearly completed in central 
and southern counties, and the grain was secured in unus- 
ually good condition. Generous and heavy showers occurred 
in all parts of the State during the last five days of the 
mouth, placing the corn crop at the end of the month in 
excellent condition. 



NOTES. 

Several observers mention the exceptionally light wind of 
the month. 

Grasshoppers have been very numerous in several south- 
western counties during the month, and have done much 
damage to corn and all growing crops. 

At more than one place the lowest and highest tempera- 
tures of the month occurred on the same day, the 25th, the 
range of temperature for that day being about 40°. 

" Hot winds," as used by most observers, is a very indefi- 
nite expression, and often means but little more than a very 



hot day, with a fresh to brisk southerly wind. Hot winds 
are reported from several western counties on the 25th. 

Voluntary observers and crop correspondents are cordially 
invited to visit the U.S. Weather Bureau office when in Lin- 
coln. The office is in room 104, Nebraska Hall, one of the 
State University buildings. The equipment of the office, 
including a full set of registering instrument, will prove 
interesting, and a personal acquaintance of those engaged 
in this work will be mutually advantageous. 

That the loss both of life and property in Nebraska due to 
lightning may be more definitely known, all observers have 
been requested to report such losses as may come within 
their knowledge. Naturally, only a small portion of the 
damage done has been reported, but a summary of reports 
received for July, 1899, is as follows : Six people killed ; 6 
houses struck; total damage done estimated at $1,734. Six 
cows and 7 horses killed ; valued at $470. 



TORNADO NEAR AINSWORTH. 

On Wednesday, July 5, Brown County, near Ainsworth, 
was visited by a tornado at 5:20 p. m., central time. Mr. A. 
H. Gale, voluntary observer at Bassett, Nebr., rode over the 
entire track on the 7th, interviewing persons nearby who wit- 
nessed and suffered by it, and has furnished a most interest- 
ing account of the storm. Space will not allow the publica- 
tion of the entire account, but the following extract has been 
made : 

Mr. A. Brown, living 5i miles northwest of Johnstown, saw it form. 
He was at work in the barn-yard, and saw a whirlwind, such as is 
often noticed on still, hot days, pass through the yard. It was noticed 
by the whirl it made among the grass straws and chaff on the ground. 
He watched its onward movement indifferently at first, but soon saw 
it gather a color which made it definable, and afterward he paid close 
attention and saw it become black, angry, and gyrating vigorously. At 
the same time a funnel began to lower from a turbulent, low-hanging 
cloud. The column and cloud soon connected and took on a terrifying 
aspect. Up to this time he had no feeling of apprehension. About 2£ 
miles from Mr. Brown's house it struck the house of Mr. John Strohm, 
where the first damage was done. The destruction here was complete; 
house of heavy logs, windmill and tower, and stables, in all 7 buildings, 
destroyed. The direction of movement was a little south of east. The 
path of the storm was 18 to 19 miles long, anil required about sixty min- 
utes to pass that distance. Four houses were destroyed and one woman 
killed. It was noticed that the tendency of the tornado was to quickly 
empty itself of the trash picked up, but the very lightest material re- 
mained long afloat. The electrical discharges which might be expected 
were missing: but one person observed any, and then but one flash. 
Mr. W. E. Jerome, living 4i miles from Long Pine, observed the break- 
ing up of the funnel. He says it came to a stand, wavered, spread out, 
lost color and motion, and collapsed with a fall of light rubbish and 
loose trash, immediately followed by sharp hail. 



CLIMATOLOGY OF THE MONTH. 

General characteristics: The month was characterized by 
low temperature, light wind, and a rainfall slightly below 
normal. There was no prolonged hot spell, and no day or 
period which was generally the hottest part of the month. 
The maximum temperatures exceeded 100° in a few western 
counties, and were below 100° elsewhere. The rainfall oc- 
curred in the form of local thunderstorms, as is usually the 
case in July in Nebraska. This often causes a large differ- 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



July, 1899. 



once in the monthly amounts of rainfall at places close to 
each other, and makes an accurate chart peculiarly hard to 
draw. The 17th, 18th, 20th, and 21st were the only days 
without an appreciable amount of rainfall at some of the 
stations in the State. 

Atmospheric pressure: The mean pressure was 29.92 inches, 
which is a little below normal for July. The highest during 
the month was 30.26 inches, at Lincoln on the 8th, and the 
lowest, 29.60 inches, at Valentine on the 22d. 

Temperature: The mean temperature for the State, as de- 
termined from the records of 91 stations, was 73.4°, which 
is about 1.3° below the average of the past twenty-four years. 
The highest temperature was 106°, at Imperial and Madrid 
on the 25th, and the lowest, 36°, at Kennedy on the 28th. 
The mean daily range of temperature, as computed from the 
records of 53 stations, was 27.0°. The greatest range at any 
station was 54°, at Lodgepole on the 25th. 

Wind: The prevailing direction of the wind was from the 
south. The average velocity was 7.0 miles an hour, which 
is 0.5 of a mile below the normal. The highest was 36 miles 
an hour from the northwest, at Lincoln on the 2d, and 36 
miles an hour from the southwest, at Valentine on the 25th. 

Precipitation: The average precipitation for the State, as 
determined from the records of 139 stations, was 2.87 inches, 
which is 0.53 of an inch below the average of the past twenty- 
four years. The largest precipitation reported at any one 
station was 10.85 inches, at Salem, and the least, 0.04 of an 
inch, at Cody. 

Corona : A corona was observed on the 24th. 

Fog : Fog occurred on the 3d, 4th, 12th, 14th, 20th, 22d, 
23d, 24th, and 25th. 

Hail: Hail fell on the 4th, 5th, 15th, and 31st. 

Parhelia: Parhelia were reported on the 26th and 27th. 

Rainbows: Rainbows were reported on the 2d, 3d, and 11th. 

Thunderstorms: Thunderstorms occurred on the 1st, 2d, 
3d, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th, 13th, 15th, 16th, 
23d, 27th, 28th, 29th, 30th, and 31st. 

Barometer, -wind, and humidity table. 





Barometer. 


Wind. 


Humidity. 


Stations. 


d 

CO 


X 


6 

a 


CO 

& 

O 
►J 




& 
> 

Sc 

SB 




o 

01 • 
«£■ 

ID O 
< 


Maximum 
velocity. 


d 
eg 

K 


CO 

& 
O 






00 

eg 
1 


6 

5 


CS 

n 


0) 

O 




29-95 
29.96 
29.94 
29.9! 
29.92 


30.24 
30.26 
30.20 
30.24 
30.24 


8 
8 

17 
8 

29 


29.70 
29.69 
29.64 
29.64 
29.60 


31 
3i 
5 
3' 
22 


















Lincoln 

North Platte . 


5,588 
6,040 
4,756 
7,43' 


7-5 
8.1 
6.4 
10. 


36 
32 

27 
36 


nw. 
w. 
n. 
sw. 


2 

3' 
29 

25 


71 
68 
72 


28 
18 

37 


25 
25 
18 











Means for the six equal sections of the State. 





Temperature. 


Precipitation. 


Number of days- 


Sections. 


Mean. 


Aver- 
age.* 


Mean. 


Aver- 
ages 


Rainy. 


Clear. 


Partly 
cloudy. 


Cloudy. 


Southeastern 


75-2 
72.6 
73-o 
74-9 
72.2 

72.3 
73-4 


76.7 
75-4 
75-4 
77-5 
73-8 
73-i 
75-3 


4-15 
2.93 
2.80 
3-28 
2.18 
1.89 

2.87 


4.27 
3-86 
4.06 

3-79 
2.46 
2-55 
3-50 


6.6 
6-5 
5-8 
6.1 
5-8 
5-2 
6.0 


12.9 
14.8 
15-5 
12.9 

•3-9 
16.0 

14-3 


12.5 
12.2 

9-5 
13- 1 

9.6 
10.4 

11. 2 


5-6 
4.0 
6.0 
5-o 
7-5 
4.6 

5-4 


Southwestern 


State 





* For ten years. 



t For twenty years. 



COMPARISON OF PAST JULYS. 

The monthly maximum and minimum temperatures for several sta- 
tions have been obtained for the years 1870 to 1888, and the following 
table has been revised, and differs slightly from the comparative tables 
previously published : 



Years. 



1876 , 
1877 

1878 . 

1879 ■ 

1880 , 

1881 , 

1882 . 

1883 . 

1884 . 
1S85 ■ 

1886 , 

1887 . 

1888 , 



Temperature. 


Pre- 
cipita- 
tion. 








Mean. 


Max. 


Min. 


75-9 


103 


48 


4.28 


75 


2 


107 


45 


1.45 


75 


5 


100 


53 


5-71 


75 


2 


99 


53 


5-92 


73 


4 


105 


45 


3-36 


75 


8 


104 


58 


3.38 


70 


8 


97 


45 


3-40 


74 





leg 


40 


2.81 


74 


7 


101 


40 


5-79 


75 


1 


100 


48 


4-32 


75 


2 


IIO 


56 


1.84 


75 


6 


106 


38 


3-io 


77 


7 


'05 


42 


3- io 


73 


4 


II I 


38 


5-77 



Years. 



890 



893 
894 
895 
896 
897 
s.,s 



Average for 
the past 24 
years 



Temperature. 


Mean. 


Max. 


Min. 


78.8 


112 


40 


70. 1 


102 


37 


75-0 


H3 


40 


75-7 


1 10 


4" 


76.4 


"14 


43 


72.7 


110 


3° 


74-3 


109 


44 


75-9 


112 


3* 


74.0 


108 


35 


73-4 


106 


3° 


74-7 


106 


43 



Pre- 
cipita- 
tion. 



2. 10 
5.48 
2.57 
2.62 
■•43 
'■73 
3-87 
2-57 
2. 12 
2. 87 



Climatological data— supplemental table. 



Sections and 
stations. 



3 c 



cVcc 



v eg 



Precipitation, in 
inches. 



Northeastern 

Bellevue 

Ewing 

Hubbard 

Lyons 

Monroe 

Schuyler 

Sioux City, Iowa 

Wisner 

Yankton, S. Dak 

Southeastern. 

Benedict 

Bradshaw 

Burchard 

Chester 

Clatonia 

Eden 

Fairfield 

Fairmont 

Hickman 

McCool Junct.. . 

Marquette 

Nemaha 

Odell 

Osceola 

Palmyra 

Plattsmouth 

Pleasanthill — 

Salem 

State Farm 

Strang 

Syracuse 

Tablerock 

Valparaiso 

Wilber 

Central. 

Burwell 

Elba 

Greeley 

Palmer 

St.Libory 

Southwestern. 

Bartley 

Culbertson 

Hayes Center... 

Ough 

Oxford 

Sargent 

Stratton 

Wallace 

Wauneta 

Wellfleet '.. 

Western. 

Paxton 

Thedford 

Willard 

Northwestern. 

Bassett 

Cody 

Gordon 

Johnstown 

Merriman 

Spragg 



73-5 



75-6 



74-4 
73-8 



76.0 
79.6 



80.9 
75-2 
76.6 



78.4 
76.2 
72.0 



73-9 



74.6 



3-°4 
1.08 
1.29 
2-37 
1. 61 
2.50 
1. 00 
2-75 
2.87 

3-98 

3.28 
4.69 
6.13 
3-77 
7.68 
2.45 
3-33 
1.90 

3-°3 
2.99 
5-48 
4.70 
6.35 
1-32 
1.98 
3-8o 
10.85 



Number of 
days— 



-'•"3 
-1.79 



-0.42 



2.45 
1. 81 
6.06 
2.61 
3-89 

1.27 

2.87 
2.85 
2.79 
2.35 

1. 91 
3-95 
3-36 
2.50 



3-59 
2.64 
2-95 
3-"i 



2.81 
3- 32 
1.88 

3-°7 
0.04 
1.50 
0.25 
0.55 
1.98 



-o. 14 
-1.96 
-0.57 
-0.64 



+ 0-37 
+ 2.52 



+3-62 
—0.81 
+ 1-45 
—0-95 
+0.79 
— 0.61 
+ 0.96 
+0.38 
+3-o6 
— 1.66 
—3-34 



+ 5- 



+0.23 
~2-59 
+ 2-33 



—0-37 

-1.76 
— 1.06 
+0.85 
—0-34 
+ 0. 12 



+ 1.04 

+0.87 
+0.32 



+0-35 
+0.72 
+0.23 



+ 0.23 



se. 
sw. 



Observers. 



E.F.Stouffer. 
G. H.Benson. 
M.M. Beacom. 
N.K.Kellam. 
Wm. Webster. 
L.N.Dickinson. 
Weather Bureau. 
Geo. W. Howe. 
Weather Bureau. 

R.B. Brabham. 

E.C.Roggy. 

3. A. Kinsey. 

W..T. Kissick. 

F.W.. Jones. 

D.J.Wood. 

M. L.Jones. 

G.H.Borden. 

O.O.Franklin. 

F.E.Porter. 

John Ellis. 

R.J. Duff. 

I.B.Huffman. 

G. W.Murbarger. 

W.D.Bancroft. 

W.Z.Pickett. 

J. W. Ingles. 

W.W.McDermet. 

S.W.Perin. 

S.Diller. 

L.Howell. 

S.H.Dopp. 

W.J.Craven. 

S.E.Davis. 

W.S.Green. 
S.M.Wellman. 
J. A.Pinkerton. 
E.H.Smith. 
W.I. Meadcr. 

R.S.Baker. 
Mrs.L. A. Wibley. 
R.C.Orr. 
Win. Ough. 
Dr. L.M.Brady. 
J.S.Spooner. 
C.W.Shurtliff. 
H.S.Toogood. 
J.W.Hann. 
Wm.G. Hawkins. 

Frank N. Pearl. 
B. A. Harrow. 
Wesley W.Lewis. 

A. II. Gale. 
W.E.Pontius. 
Amos Burwell. 
F.Avery. 
F. Hussong. 
S.W. Spragg. 






July, 1899. 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



Climatological data for Nebraska, July, 1899. 



Stations. 



Northeastern Sec. 

Agee * 

Blair 

Columbus 

t'reighton 

Fremont 

Hartington 

Hooper* 

Lynch 

Madison 

Norfolk 

Oakdale 

Omaha 

O'Neill 

Santee Agency 

Stanton* 

Tekamah 

Wakefield 

Westpoint 

Southeastern Sec. 

Arborville* 

Ashland 

Auburn 

Aurora * 

Beatrice 

Crete 

David City 

Dawson 

Edgar* 

Fairbury 

Geneva 

Harvard 

Hebron 

Lincoln 

Nebraska City 

Rulo* 

Seward * 

Superior* 

Tecumseh 

Turlington 

Weepingwater * 

Wymore* 

York* 

Central Sec 

Albion 

Ansley 

Ashton* 

Brokenbow* 

Callaway 

Central City* 

Dunning* 

Ericson * 

Genoa 

Gothenburg 

Grand Island 

Kearney * 

Lexington 

Loup* 

North Loup 

Ord * 

Ravenna 

St. Paul* 

Southwestern Sec. 

Alma * 

Arapahoe* 

Beaver City 

Benkelman* 

Bluehill* 

Curtis 

Franklin 

Haigler * 

Hastings* 

Holdrege* 

Imperial 

McCook * 

Madrid* 

Minden 

Redcloud* 

Republican* 

Wilsonville* 

Western Sec. 

Camp Clarke 

Gering 

Kimball 

Lodgepole 

Nesbit 

North Platte 

Seneca* 

Whitman* 

Nobthwestern Sec. 

Alliance * 

Fort Robinson 

Hay Springs 

Kennedy 

Kirkwood * 

Springview 

Valentine 



Counties. 



Holt 

Washington. 

Platte 

Knox 

Dodge 

Cedar 

Dodge 

Boyd 

Madison .... 

...do 

Antelope 

Douglas 

Holt 

Knox 

Stanton 

Burt 

Dixon 

Cuming 



York 

Saunders — 

Nemaha 

Hamilton ... 

Gage 

Saline 

Butler 

Richardson . 

Clay 

Jefferson 

Fillmore 

Clay 

Thayer 

Lancaster. . 

Otoe 

Richardson . 

Seward 

Nuckolls 

Johnson 

Otoe 

Cass 

Gage 

York 



Boone 

Custer 

Sherman 

Custer 

...do 

Merrick 

Blaine 

Wheeler 

Platte 

Dawson 

Hall 

Buffalo 

Dawson 

Sherman 

Valley 

do 

Buffalo 

Howard 



Harlan 

Furnas 

...do 

Dundy 

Webster 

Frontier 

Franklin 

Dundy 

Adams 

Phelps 

Chase 

Red Willow. 

Perkins 

Kearney 

Webster 

Harlan 

F'urnas 



Cheyenne . . . 
Scotts Bluff. 

Kimball 

Cheyenne . . . 

Logan 

Lincoln 

Thomas 

Grant 



Box Butte . 

Dawes 

Sheridan . . . 

Cherry 

Rock 

Keya Paha . 
Cherry 



1,442 
1,600 
1,203 
',3°9 



1-58S 
1.532 
1,722 
1,103 
1,975 



1,472 
1,060 
1,387 
1,313 



1,100 
1,051 
1,792 

1,235 
1,368 
1,619 

945 
1,722 
1,316 
1,633 
1,812 
1,458 
1,199 
941 
842 
1,435 
1,574 
I,U3 
1,214 
1,080 
1,222 
1,642 

1,747 
2,307 
2,061 
2,477 
2,555 
1,708 
2,621 
2,029 
1,584 
2,557 
1,860 
2,146 
2,385 
2,067 
1,961 



2,028 
1,796 

1,939 
2,173 
2,147 
2,968 
1,967 
2,553 
1,820 
3,256 
i,932 
2,324 
3,278 
2,506 
3,294 
2, 169 
1,687 
1,939 
2,298 

3,7oo 



4,697 
3,820 



2,971 
3,588 

3,968 
3,764 
3,821 



2,613 



Temperature, in degrees Fahrenheit. 






» to 




oS 




o>, 


.e - 


*^T3 


bf t* 


C O 


0> 


►J 



72.5 
72.8 

72.5 
72.9 

72.0 
72.0 

72.3 

73-4 
71.4 
72.7 
72.4 
75-0 
71.5 
75-8 
72.2 
73-2 
72.4 
72.2 

72.9 

74.8 
75-6 
75-4 
74-6 
73-5 
74-6 
75-7 



'75-0 
74-7 
72.8 
73-2 
74-4 
74-4 



74-8 
79.0 
75-5 
74-8 
72-3 
76.9 
74-4 

7°-3 
71-4 
75-3 
71.8 
72.0 
75-3 
70.0 

75-2 
74-2 
71-9 
74-2 
77-4 
71.0 
71.2 



73-o 
71.8 
75-o 

73-9 

76.5 
75-9 
73-6 
74-4 
73-8' 
75-4' 



73-o 



73-7 
74-5 
77.8 
72.4 
74-9 
77-7 
76.5 

75-8 
72.8 
69. 1 
70.8' 
71.8 
72.6 
72.8 



69. 1 
72.0 
72.0 
72.2 
72.4 
76.0 
73-6 



s 



—2.1 



+0.4 
— 1.0 
— 3-o 

— 1.4 



—1-3 

— 1-7 
—0.6 



— 1-5 
—0.6 
—1-5 
—i-7 



—2.7 
— 2.0 
— o-5 
—3-0 

— 1-4 
+2-7 
+ 2.0 



— 1.2 
—2.3 
—3-0 
—i-7 
—1.6 



— 1-7 
+ 1.2 
—2-3 



"3-6 



—1.9 
— o. 1 
—3-9 
-r.6 
—3-3 
—3^9 
—2-3 
—0.8 
—3-2 
0.0 
+ 1.1 
— 1.0 



-2.0 
-1.2 



+ O.9 
—2.9 

—1-5 
—2.6 
—0.7 



-1-3 



—2.3 
-2.4 

+ 1-5 
—3-2 



+0.2 

—2.6 

+0.3 

— 2.1 

—0.8 

— 0.2 



—2.8 

— 0.2 
+ 0.7 
— 1.2 



+ 1-3 
+ 0.5 



95 



-V 



-•5 



22t 



56 



10+ 



42 



34 



Precipitation, in inches. 



o£ 



c o 

►J 



4.32 
2.54 
4.11 
2.55 

2-95 
1.66 
3-52 
3-37 
3.01 
2.16 
1-35 
1-73 
4.98 
2.56 
3-25 
3-21 
0.83 
3.58 

3-°3 

3-54 
5-63 



4.91 
2.71 
4-5° 
8.15 

2. 10 
5.16 
2.6l 

4-3° 
5.60 
1.47 
2-97 
6.31 
4.09 
5.20 
5-15 
1.85 
2.61 
4.92 
5-35 

2. 17 

4.86 

3-1° 
6.42 
1.40 
3-44 



1.70 
1. 71 
1.08 
2.48 
4.90 
4.06 
3-36 
1. 18 
0.84 

2. II 
4-73 

2.79 
I. 10 

3-94 

2.42 
2.98 
5-7° 
3-70 
2.87 
2.20 
3.60 
3-12 
3.01 
2.95 
3-39 
5.01 
3-»3 
6. 10 

2.26 
2.50 
2.70 
2.65 
3-42 
2.04 
0.28 
o-i5 

1.85 
0.97 
1.60 
3.18 
4. 10 
2.61 
1-34 



2§ 



+1.; 



+1.84 
—1-25 
—1.19 
— 1.04 



— 0.06 
+0.99 
— 1.60 

—1. 81 

—3-02 

+2.42 
—0.38 

— 0.06 

— 0.20 
—2.03 
— O.69 

+ 0.81 

—0.86 
+0.81 



+0.76 
— o. 75 
+ 0.24 

+4-02 

+0.28 
+0.46 
+0.08 
+ 1.78 
+ 1-59 
—2.25 
—0.50 
+ 1.88 
+ 0.96 
+ 0.48 
+°-94 
— 0.87 
-1-25 



+ 1.48 

+ 0-57 
+ 1.96 
+ 1.26 
+3-55 
— 0.14 
+ 0.56 



— 1.02 
-1.87 
—0.28 
— 0.02 
+ 0.65 
+ 1.86 
+0.88 

— 1-93 
—0.71 

— 1.84 
+0.46 

— 0.96 
— 0.42 
+ 0.27 
+0.15 
+ 0.61 
+ 2.96 
+ 0.56 
-0.51 
—0.77 
+ 0.8S 
+ 0.69 
+0.98 
+ 1-59 
—1-39 
+ 1.42 
—0.18 
+3-28 



+0-53 
+0.19 
+0.51 
+ 1.27 
—0-54 
— 2.62 
— 2.02 

—0.78 

—0.95 
— 0.69 

+ 0.49 
+ 0.40 

+0.54 
— 1-51 



3-25 
0.59 
2.69 
1.20 
0.65 
1.07 
0.89 
2.38 
0.63 
0.90 
0.51 
0.48 
1.50 
1.87 
0.85 
1. 00 

o.45 
0.80 



1. 21 

1.45 
3-05 



2.50 
1.60 
1.85 
2.44 
0.65 
2.40 
1-15 
1. 14 
2.41 
0.84 
0.84 
2.30 
2.77 
1.65 
2.72 
0.65 
1. 12 
i-55 
2.30 

0.69 

1-53 
1.05 
2.85 
o-75 
1-50 



0.50 
o.95 
°-5i 
0.62 
1.60 
1. 80 
1.08 
0.85 
0-75 
1. 17 
2.03 

1.02 

0-45 
3.00 

1-03 
0.70 
2.30 
1-53 
1-34 
0.50 
1.50 
0.87 
1.06 
1. 00 
0.91 
1-75 
2.57 
2.60 

0.60 
0.67 
0.52 
0.90 
2.52 
0.60 
o. 10 
0.15 

0.70 
0.40 
0.98 
1.68 
1. 91 

1.5° 
0.62 



5 » 



S 

3 



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O m 



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3 



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!§■ ° ■ 

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- >■ '-'-' 

£> 3 .0^ 

go a 

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■a a 



se. 
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sw. 



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s. 



sw. 
ne. 

s. 

ne. 

se. 

s. 



ne. 
se. 



se. 
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ne. 

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nw. 
nw. 



nw. 
sw. 



Observers. 



R.E.Bowden. 

E. A. Palmer. 
C.C.Gray. 

Dr. Geo. Roberts. 

Wm. J. Phillips. 

T. B.A.Watson. 

T.W.Lyman. 

C.C.Irwin. 

Dr. F.A.Long. 

Dr. P. H.Salter. 

G.S.C'lingman. 

U. S. Weather Bureau. 

Chas. N.Cole. 

W.H.Hamlin. 

W.Gerecke. 

Dr. A. D. Nesbit. 

I. H. Weaver. 

C.J.Kadish. 

E.D.Smith. 

Dr.A.S. vMansfelde. 

G. D. Carrington. 

H.C.Miller. 

A.C.Zimmerman. 

Doane College. 

J.K.Townsend. 

M.L.Libbee. 

L.L. Fuller. 

W.F.Cramb. 

F.M.Flory. 

Dr. J. T.Fleming. 

Dr.C.M.Easton. 

U. S. Weather Bureau. 

E.Morton. 

W.F.Gingrich. 

L.E.Ost. 

L.W.Hahn. 

C.M.Miller. 

Wm.N. Hunter. 

G. Treat. 

H.B.Ware. 

O.P.Lowry. 

F. A.Pettinger. 
Chas. R. Hare. 
F.Rein. 
H.L.Ormsby. 
Geo.B.Mair. 
J. A.McRae. 
L.L. Williams. 
A.Dahl. 

Geo. S.Truman. 
A. V.Carlson. 
E.Corbin. 
C.E.Magner. 
Ira P.Griswold. 
E.S. Hay hurst. 
J.E.Goodrich. 
Jas. Milford. 
Erastus Smith. 
Paul Anderson. 

R.E. Pitcher. 
J F.Edwards. 
C.G.George. 
W.F. Winger. 
C.S. Draper. 
Dr. S.R. Razee. 
F.T.Owen. 
T.P.F.Haine. 
J.C.Swarts. 

C. Engstrom. 
Robert Malcolm. 
C.T.Watson. 
John McKenzie. 
Joel Hull. 
A.Conoven. 
W.Bardon. 

D. F. Hostetter. 

Robt. II. Willis. 
J.P.Finley. 
F.J. Bellows. 
A.B.Persinger. 
Grant E.Bolkcom. 
U. S. Weather Bureau. 
F.D.Gallup. 
D.McNall. 

J.Kridelbaugh. 

Post surgeon. 

C. A. Waterman. 

D.A.Piercy. 

Mrs.C.Arter. 

Miss Ezada Phelps. 

U.S. Weather Bureau. 



* Temperature data from thermometers not self registering. + Occurred on more than one day. », b , °, etc., indicate number of days missing from observed readings 
All records are used in determining State or district means, but State and district departures are determined by comparison of current dataot only stations with normals 









CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



July, 1899. 






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CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



* i 

.RiLY, 1899. 



Daily precipitation for Nebraska, July, 1899. 



Stations. 


Day of month. 




i. 


2. 


3- 


4- 


5- 


6. 


7- 


8. 


9- 


10. 


II, 


12. 


13- 


14. 


■5- 


16. 


17- 


18. 


'9- 


20. 


21. 


22. 


23- 


24. 


25- 


26. 


27. 


28. 


29. 


3°- 


3'. 


a) 

O 










t 


■36 
.02 

t 
i- 2 5 
1.07 




















•47 
.27 
.40 
















.09 






t 


t 
.68 

t 

•93 
•"7 
•'5 
'•45 


•17 


t 






4.34 
2.17 
1.85 
2.79 
4.86 
3-03 
3-54 
5-63 


Albion 




.28 

•5' 
.07 
■27 
• 74 
■15 














. 11 
•45 


.07 
1.53 


.69 


"t" 


.12 
















• 30 


•27 

01 


t 

.04 
•93 
.10 




.70 


t 
















t 










1.02 

•05 


t 








•19 












•°3 








































. 10 






.76 
























1.21 
•70 
.IO 
























.09 

.12 

2.03 




■14 








■15 








t 
.20 






. 11 
.09 
































3-°5 












































































.16 
i. 91 

•57 
•33 
.40 


t 








t 












.12 




.02 
















.61 








■13 

t 


■79 
•°5 

•73 

3.00 

.82 

•5° 

■43 


.08 
t 


t 


•5° 


1. 91 
3-67 
4.91 
3-94 
2.42 
2-54 
2.98 
6.42 
4.69 
1.27 
1.40 


Bassetl 




■57 
.06 


•5° 
.02 






t 






.14 




















t 






1.05 


2.50 










































•°5 








. 11 














.07 
t 








•32 
•15 
•03 
•47 
2.85 


.04 
.02 
t 


t 


•47 




















1.03 
•5' 






















Blair 




•59 
t 

.'5 

.22 


t 


.70 
1-3° 


.02 








•03 

•35 




.01 

■35 
1.70 
.10 


.08 


t 
•°3 


•3" 
























■65 
•17 
































• 30 
.62 






















.10 


















2.42 






































1.40 










.03 










•5° 




























• 42 

■75 


. 10 






















.40 
.24 


















•25 
. 20 










.60 

t 


t 
.06 


.06 




t 


.25 


. 11 
.28 

.02 


•15 








.09 








.38 




f 
















t 








t 
■94 

■75 












2.69 
















•30 


.40 


4. 11 
2-55 

2.71 

3-95 
5-70 
4-5° 
8.15 






1.20 
1.60 

2.30 








.06 


.04 




•35 

•55 
.20 


























•°3 


.04 




.12 
•3° 

t 


.22 


■34 
























• 34 

■45 


•°3 
■77 
1-75 


.40 
.16 




.30 




















•30 

.40 






.20 
























1 • 55 


•19 




2-44 


•43 








.01 


t 


•35 
1.30 




















1.85 


























t 


t 


2.23 












































































































•3° 
.80 


.48 

• 30 


t 


•25 
.42 












.10 


.40 






























■5° 


•'5 

2.40 

'•53 
t 
•32 








1.70 
5.16 
0.97 
3-70 
2-95 
2.61 
1. 71 
2.50 
1.80 
2.48 
2.85 
2.87 






1.03 






































•°3 
.10 
.01 




.41 














■05 


.20 
•54 

.02 
•25 


.02 

• 44 
t 

• 32 

t 

.62 


. 10 


.40 
•'3 

.65 

.08 
.67 
























.10 
.69 
.44 
.16 

•95 
.02 
.10 

•25 

•75 






.20 
■5° 

.28 
t 

.46 
• 23 


.02 


.92 
t 

•37 
•°5 


























.02 












•15 






.07 




•29 


.02 




























.01 










t 
• 47 










t 


•15 


t 


.26 








t 










t 
• 51 










t 
.28 


.06 
. 12 


•25 
.10 


.20 


















t 












.02 

• °S 


"+' 


.68 
•°5 














•3° 


.06 

t 


































•5° 

■75 
















1.50 
























!i6 

•45 


■29 


•34 






. 10 














1-34 

•33 
•3' 
.56 

2.41 
•35 
•57 


•°5 
.20 

•35 

. 10 

t 
■15 

t 
•35 


.42 

t 

1.50 
.81 
•50 


.01 

.02 

'.'64 






• 05 

1. 14 


1.07 
.07 
•5° 


.68 


•25 


•13 
.'28 


• 77 
.09 




.01 


























.04 

■37 
. 12 
.64 

.20 










• 44 
.10 
•74 




•23 


.01 






















4-3° 
















































•72 
















.28 










3-36 




t 


•77 


•15 
.11 

r.oo 
• 4° 

1.60 


.16 


.48 


1.48 


. 11 




t 


".10 


.98 


t 
. 10 


t 


















t 




• °5 
























5.60 
3-6o 
3-12 
4.9° 
3.18 
2.70 
4.06 
1.47 
2.6s 
3-36 
3-37 
2-37 
3-oi 
2-95 
0-55 
3-39 
2.97 
5-48 
3-42 














.60 

.70 
• 27 
.66 




























t 


t 
•3° 








t 


t 




t 




.20 




t 
.20 












.12 


•13 






.87 


t 

.70 
. 10 
• 27 
•25 
. 22 






•55 




























1.68 
• 07 




i.80 

•25 
1.08 
.02 
t 
.48 


.07 

t 


•35 

t 


.07 
.18 


























.26 
1. 01 
.58 


• 52 


.20 








t 


t 




















t 


■34 
■95 
.01 


t 

•29 
t 


.20 
•05 

•75 
























t 










.26 


t 


t 


.02 










t 


.09 




t 
.90 




























•75 


t 






























•13 

2.38 

.60 

. 12 


t 


■5° 


.58 
. 11 

t 
t 






























1.07 






.63 




t 


t 


.08 
..„ 


•3° 






















t 






.06 








.80 
■58 
.46 

.01 






.46 


•75 
.10 


t 
.46 
















.48 
.63 
















.40 
■15 






























































1. 00 




•75 
•25 










.20 








































•9' 

.38 
.68 
.66 
■°5 


.01 


.78 












.41 






•37 














.06 








•36 
.60 


.48 

■50 
.10 


■ 73 
1.58 






.84 


.26 
2.00 




t 
■3° 


.06 

.62 
■05 




. 10 




























.02 
.01 




. 10 
































•°5 


t 


•42 


.02 


















t 






2.52 


.90 


Norfolk 






t 


•43 








.04 
















t 


.01 










•38 




















.85 


1 18 






.60 
.21 


. 02 


t 


.14 


t 








.04 






.24 


















.18 

t 






.58 
•5i 


•3° 

t 






.08 


2.04 

'■35 










t 




.48 




.01 




















t 




































t 
1.70 


.20 




t 
•3° 


. 12 
1.65 






t 








• 44 
1. 00 




•'7 
t- 


















•°3 




t 


.48 








•29 
1.50 
1.02 

.02 

t 


'•73 
4.98 
6-35 
2.50 
2.79 
1.98 








t 






.08 
















t 






























.98 
.20 
. 10 
•°5 
•34 
•5° 




























•5° 
1.26 




















'•35 








•3° 

.08 
•07 

2.00 


•'5 

•°5 

'•35 
1.20 


•05 










t 


.86 

•4i 
• 30 






































•52 








1-25 


.20 


•°5 










.10 
.17 
.36 


.20 




























. 10 
•25 
•73 








t 


1. 00 






























•15 
2.30 


•35 












.08 






















5-0' 
6.3' 
4-73 
2.56 
2.50 
























2.03 
• 09 












■■47 
■17 
•35 
.10 
•32 
.08 


•33 
•55 




• 39 














.06 








•63 
•°5 
•45 






1.87 


.02 


.63 

•°5 

.40 






•°3 


























.02 












.10 






























•35 






• °5 
















•03 


















.10 












2-77 
1.03 




•29 

.2U 














.18 




















.09 


.07 
•27 


•35 




.02 




4.09 
1.98 






























































































•'5 








•47 
1. 10 
2.72 

.16 


•55 




. 11 




t 




.76 
.80 
■17 


.01 


• 31 
























.85 
■25 








.60 

.80 


3.25 
5.20 
5-15 
3.21 
3-32 
1.85 
'•34 






.60 




•75 


•25 






















.01 


1.65 
i-45 








.04 

1. 00 

• 44 
.62 
1.42 
.08 








































.21 








•15 




.04 




















•85 
. 12 
.14 
. 12 
■45 


Thedforrt 


•39 




.78 

t 










2.03 
•07 
.14 
































•23 










• 32 

.14 


.16 

.40 
•45 




























.65 

. 10 
■°3 
















t 


t 


.10 


.02 






















.08 


.02 


.10 


.08 










































I. 12 




•23 
■ 73 








.04 




t 

.36 
• 25 




























0.83 






.62 






•15 


.02 

. 10 
























■37 
.80 


. 12 




.60 






.80 






•3° 




t 


t 
























3.58 
°-'5 
2-75 
5-35 












































•IS 
2.30 






.36 
1-32 






.18 






.56 
.46 


■59 
.60 


• 30 


•09 
























.65 
.16 


. 10 


. 11 


•17 




York 

































































t Trace (when precipitation is less than 0.01 of an inch). 



if 

o> t/PR v 

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. 

#$4 



REPORT FOR AUGUST. 1899. 



NEBRASKA SECTION 



OF THE 



CLIMATE AND CROP SERVICE 



OF THE 



WEATHER BUREAU. 



PUBLISHED BY AUTHORITY OF THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE. 



UNDER DIRECTION OP 

WILLIS L. MOORE 

CHIEF OP WEATHER BUREAU 



BY 



G. fl. LOVEhAHD, 

SECTION DIRECTOR, 

Office, University of Nebraska, Lincoln. 




Natural Hi 






e-i 
co 

P 

P 

< 
p 



55 



> 

a! 

Oh 
Q 

«< 
CO 

S 
05 
H. 

w 

o 

CO 

i— i 

w 



O 




August, 1899. 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, 

CLIMATE AND CROP SERVICE 

OK THE 

WEATHER BUREAU. 

CENTRAL OFFICE: WASHINGTON, D. C. 



NEBRASKA SECTION, 

G. A. LOVELAND, Section Director, 

LINCOLN, NEBR. 



Vol. IV. 



LINCOLN, NEBR. 



No. 8. 



THE FALL ARMY WORM. 
By W. D. Hunter, 

Assistant Entomologist, Nebraska Agricultural Experiment Station. 

Probably the insect that has accomplished greater destruc- 
tion to crops and has attracted more attention than any other 
single species this year in Nebraska is the one figured here- 
with, and commonly known by the above title and to scien- 
tists as Laphygma frugipcrda, S. & A. The entomologists 
have been as much interested in this as the farmers, because 
the insect has never before appeared in the State in destruc- 
tive numbers, and has displayed an especial liking for al- 
falfa, which has hitherto been exempt from its attack and 
widely recommended on that account. 





The Pall Army Worm: », full 
grown worm, natural size ; *>, 
head, front view ; °, •', joint of 
body, enlarged.— [After Kiley.] 



Fall Army Worm Moth : », 
typical form ; •>, «, showing vari- 
ations.— [After Riley.] 



It should be understood that this insect is entirely distinct 
from the regular Army Worm well known to western farm- 
ers. In the first place, the Army Worm never appears much 
after the middle of July, and this one never in destructive 
numbers until long after that time. There are many other 
differences. Among them may be stated the following : The 
true Army Worm is almost naked, but the Fall Army Worm 
is covered with sparse, bristle-like hairs set upon small, 
black spots that appear upon the lighter colored portions of 
the body, possesses a light colored marking shaped like an 
inverted Y upon the top of the head, which the other does 
not, and is, moreover, considerably smaller in size. 

METHODS OF FIGHTING. 

By delaying the planting of wheat until about the 20th of 



September, so that the plants will appear after the worms 
have left for the year, it will be saved. 

Farmers are advised to plow all land upon which the 
worms have appeared this season as deeply as possible. This 
will bury the chrysalids, in which stage the insect passes the 
winter, so that they will never develop. This method will 
be successful in proportion as the ground is rolled or har- 
rowed after the plowing. With the other well-known advan- 
tages of fall plowing, there is no reason to suppose that we 
do not have an almost perfect means of defense. In alfalfa 
fields, as well as in other situations where plowing can not 
be done, the ground should be thoroughly disked this fall, 
and very few worms will escape destruction. 



CROP CONDITIONS. 

The fix-st two weeks of August were warm, with the tem- 
perature nearly continuously above the normal. Although 
showers were general and heavy, corn deteriorated somewhat 
in condition in many parts of the State. Heavy, general 
rains on the 12th and 13th did considerable damage to grain 
in shock in eastern counties. 

The last half of August was dry, with only scattered 
showers, and the temperature continued high. These con- 
ditions were unfavorable for the growth of corn in most 
parts of the State. In small areas where the showers were 
sufficiently heavy, corn continued to grow well. Good prog- 
ress was made during this period with haying and thrashing 
of small grain, and a large amount of plowing was done. 



NOTES. 

Several observers note that the wind of the month was not 
sufficient to furnish power to pump enough water for stock. 

Considerable damage was done by hail in Saline County, 
but generally little damage has resulted from the hail-storms 
of the month. 

Hot winds occurred in the southwestern portion of the 
State on the 19th, 28th, 29th, and 30th, with daily maximum 
temperatures between 100° and 107°. 

Mr. C. G. George, at Beaver City, notes as follows : " Com- 
mencing at sunset the 28th and ending at sunset the 29th is 
thought to be the hottest twenty-four hours ever recorded 
here, the minimum temperature during the night being 88° 
and the maximum on the 29th, 105°." 



CLIMATOLOGY OF THE MONTH. 

General characteristics: The month was characterized by 
high temperature and heavy local showers. The showers 
occurred mostly in the first half of the month, and caused 
the average monthly rainfall for the State to be decidedly 
above the normal; in fact, it has been exceeded in only three 
Augusts since 1876— that is, in 1880, 1885, and 1887. The 
maximum temperature for the month was about normal, but 
the temperature was continuously high, the maximum being 
90° or above on sixteen days at Lincoln. 

Atmospheric pressure: The mean pressure was 29.85 inches, 
which is 0.11 of an inch below normal for August. The 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



August, 1809. 






highest during the month was BO. 14 inches, at North Platte 
on the 24th, and the lowest, 20.55 inches, at Valentine on 
the 10th. 

Temperature: The mean temperature for the State, as de- 
termined from the records of 07 stations, was 78.8°, which 
is about 1.0° above the average of the past twenty-four years. 
The highest temperature was 108°, at Camp Clarke on the 
28th, and the lowest, 31°, at Kennedy on the 31st. The 
mean daily range of temperature, as computed from the 
records of 54 stations, was 27.1°. The greatest range at any 
station was 55°, at Imperial on the 27th. 

Wind: The prevailing direction of the wind was from the 
southeast. The average velocity was 8.1 miles an hour, 
which is 0.7 of a mile above the normal. The highest was 
48 miles an hour from the northeast, at Lincoln on the 12th. 

Precipitation: The average precipitation for the State, as 
determined from the records of 138 stations, was 3.26 inches, 
which is 0.67 of an inch above the average of the past twenty- 
four years. The largest precipitation reported at any one 
station was 0.78 inches, at Fremont, and the least, 0.10 of 
an inch, at Merriman. 

Fog: Fog occurred on the 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th, 0th, 13th, 
14th, 15th, 16th, and 31st, 

Frost : Frost occurred on the 23d and 25th. 

Hail: Hail fell on the 2d, 3d, 0th, 10th, 12th, 13th, 16th, 
18th, 19th, and 26th. 

Meteors : Meteors were seen on the 9th, 10th, and 11th. 

Mirages: Mirages were observed on the 10th and 24th. 

Parhelia : Parhelia were reported on the 1st, 6th, 10th, 
and 28th. 

Rainbows : Rainbows were reported on the 3d, 7th, 10th, 
12th, 13th, 23d, and 28th. 

Thunderstorms: Thunderstorms occurred on the 1st, 2d, 
3d, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th, 0th, 10th, 11th, 12th, 13th, 14th, 
16th, 17th, 18th, 19th, 21st, 22d, 23d, 24th,' 25th, 26th, 
27th, 28th, 30th, and 31st, 

Barometer, -wind, and humidity table. 





Barometer. 


Wind. 


Humidity. 


Stations. 


g 

V 

8 


BO 
V 

X 


6 


00 

V 

f 

c 


R 


i 

u 

— . « 
O 




u ■ 

*- 3 

<u 

< 


Maximum 
velocity. 




« 




- 






X 

to 




V 

fa- 






Ashland 


29.86 
29.87 
29.84 
29.86 
29.83 


30.08 
30.10 
3°-I4 
3°-l' 
30.07 


15 
'5 
24 
15 
30 


29.63 
29-59 
29.61 
29.60 
29-55 


10 

■9 
21 
10 
ro 


















Lincoln 

North Platte . 


7.450 
6,716 
5,387 
7,900* 


10. 
9-o 
7.2 

10.6 


48 
30 
42 

36 


ne. 
s. 
ne. 
e. 


12 
22 

12 


72 
70 
74 


39 

■9 
44 


2 

29 
20 











* Record for 4J hours missing. 



Means for the six 


equal sections of the State. 






Temperature. 


Precipitation. 


Number of days- 


Sections. 


Mean. 


Aver- 
age.* 


Mean. 


Aver- 
ages 


Rainy. 


Clear. 


Partly 
cloudy. 


Cloudy. 


Southeastern 


77-2 
73-9 
75-8 
76.9 
71.8 
71.2 

73-8 


73-9 
72.2 
72.8 
74-0 
71-5 
70.6 

72.5 


4.01 
4-72 
3-46 
1. 91 
2.17 
3-27 
3.26 


3-43 
3- 13 
2-45 
2.82 
2.21 
1.66 

2.62 


6.6 
9.0 
6.9 
4-3 
6-5 
7-1 
6.7 


■3-5 
13-9 
15- 1 
16.9 
16. 1 
17-5 
15-5 


11. 6 

12.4 
10. 1 
10. 1 
9-5 
8.6 

10.4 


5-7 
4-7 
5-8 
4.0 




Northwestern 

State 


4-6 







* For ten years. 



t For twenty years. 



COMPARISON OF PAST AUGUSTS. 

The monthly maximum and minimum temperatures for several sta- 
tions have l>een obtained for the years 1876 to 1888, and the following 
table has been revised, and differs slightly from the comparative tables 
previously published : 



1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 



Temperature. 


Pre- 
cipita- 
tion. 








Mean. 


Max. 


Min. 


73-5 


97 


42 


3-25 


72.8 


102 


48 


2.04 


74-4 


103 


51 


2.16 


72.9 


100 


4b 


1-54 


73-2 


102 


34 


3-87 


78.8 


102 


52 


1. 18 


73-4 


106 


42 


i-3i 


7i-3 


102 


40 


3.21 


70-3 


97 


42 


2.97 


69.8 


96 


38 


3-9 6 


75-4 


108 


35 


3.22 


70.9 


104 


30 


4-13 


70.2 


103 


34 


3-ii 


72.9 


105 


40 


2.40 



Years. 


Temperature. 


Mean. 


Max. 


Mill. 


1890 

1891 

1892 

1893 

1894 

1895 

1896 

1897 

1898 

1899 

Average for 
the past 24 
years 


7i-7 
70.6 
73-2 
70.3 
75-8 
73-o 
73-3 
70.8 
74-2 
73.8 

72.8 


108 
106 
113 

HO 
I08 
106 
107 
IO7 
109 
108 

10.5 


34 
30 
30 
35 
36 
39 
34 
37 
42 
3' 

38 



2-59 



Climatolog-ical data— supplemental table. 



Sections and 
stations. 



t-si 
a c 
■S » 

x fa- 
s' J2 

S « 

1 2, » 

■^ <a 

c fa- 

- -' 

S » 



Northeastern. 

Bellevue 

Ewing 

Hubbard 

Lyons 

Monroe 

Schuyler 

Sioux City, Iowa 

Wisner 

Yankton, S. Dak 
Southeastern. 

Benedict 

Bradshaw 

Burchard 

Chester 

Clatonia 

Eden 

Fairfield 

Fairmont 

Hickman 

McCool Junct.. . 

Marquette 

Nemaha 

Odell 

Osceola 

Palmyra 

Plattsmouth — 
Pleasanthill — 

Salem 

State Farm 

Strang 

Syracuse 

Tablerock 

Valparaiso 

Wilber 

Central. 

Burwell 

Elba 

Greeley 

Palmer 

St.Libory 

Southwestern. 

Bartley 

Culbertson 

Hayes Center... 

Ough 

Oxford 

Sargent 

Stratton 

Wallace 

Wauneta 

Wellfleet 

Western. 

Paxton 

Thedford 

Willard 

Northwestern. 

Cody 

Gordon 

Johnstown 

Merriman 

Spragg 



74.- 



73-o 



79-5 
77-4 



77-8 
81. 1 



80.7 
79-8 
76.7 
77-4 
79-8 



80.0 



77.8 



79.8 
77.6 



Precipitation, in 
inches. 



5-48 
3-78 
4. 10 
2.90 
4.80 
8.19 
4.91 
2-59 
5-46" 

4-50 

3-59 



2.80 
4-65 
5-97 
0.85 
2.88 
3.80 
2.24 
2.56 
S.80 
4.84 
3-57 
4.72 
3-35 
4-36 
5-55 
2-34 
'■95 
4.28 
5-41 
3-64 
6.61 

3-26 

5.36 
3-25 
3-29 
3.21 

1-55 
3-24 
2.18 
2.08 



3-71 
2.04 
0.60 
1-35 



1.87 
3-o3 
1.24 

1.09 

2.40 
7. 11 
0. 10 
5.78 



6 



p 




K 


+ 2 

+ 1 


52 
04 


12 

8 
7 
7 
11 


— O 


34 



+4-30 
+ 1.91 

+0.65 
+2.69 



-i-43 



+ 1.71 
— 1.50 
— o. 19 
+0.77 
— 0. 15 
— 0.05 
+ [.69 
+0.34 
4-0.94 
+2.62 
—0.33 



+0.44 
—0.93 
— 2.20 

+ 1-55 
+ 2.61 

+ K30 

+0.66 
+ 2.32 
+ 1.05 
+0.68 
+ 0.67 



4-0.21 

—0.15 

-l-O. 12 



4-0.66 
4-0.25 
—0.85 



+0.74 



Number of 
days- 



tat f 
-5-S 



se. 
sw. 



ne. 
se. 



se. 

se. 

s. 
sw. 



sw. 

s. 



Observers. 



E.F.Stouffer. 
G.H.Benson. 
M.M.Beacom. 
N.R.Kellam. 
Wm. Webster. 
L.N.Dickinson. 
Weather Bureau. 
Geo. W. Howe. 
Weather Bureau. 

R.B. Brabham. 

E.C.Roggy. 

J. A.Kinsey. 

W.J.Kissick. 

F.W.Jones. 

D.J.Wood. 

M. L.Jones. 

G.H.Borden. 

O.O. Franklin. 

F.E.Porter. 

John Ellis. 

R.J. Duff. 

I.B.Huffman. 

G. W.Murbarger. 

W.D.Bancroft. 

W.Z.Pickett. 

J. W. Ingles. 

W.W.McDermet. 

S.W.Perin. 

S.Diller. 

L.Howell. 

S.H.Dopp. 

W . J . Craven . 

S.E.Davis. 

W.S. Green. 
S.M.Wellman. 
J. A. Pinkerton. 
E.H.Smith. 
W.I.Meader. 

R.S.Baker. 

Mrs. L. A. Wilder. 

R.C.Orr. 

Wm.Ough. 

Dr. L.M.Brady. 

J.S.Spooner. 

C.W.Shurtliff. 

H.S.Toogood. 

J.W.Hann. 

Wm. G.Hawkins. 

Frank N. Pearl. 
B. A. Harrow. 
Wesley W.Lewis. 

W. E.Pontius. 
Amos Burwell. 
O. M. Heiney. 
F. Hussong. 
S.W. Spragg. 



August, 1899. 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



Climatological data for Nebraska, August, 1899. 



Stations. 



Counties. 



Northeastern Sec. 

Agee * 

Blair 

Columbus 

Creighton 

Fremont 

Hartington 

Hooper * 

Lynch 

Madison 

Norfolk 

Oakdale 

Omaha 

O'Neill 

Santee 

Stanton* 

Tekamah 

Wakefield 

Westpoint 

Southeastern Sec. 

Arborville* 

Ashland 

Auburn 

Aurora * 

Beatrice 

Crete 

David City 

Dawson 

Edgar* 

Fairbury 

Geneva 

Harvard 

Hebron 

Lincoln 

Nebraska City 

Rulo* 

Seward * 

Superior* 

Tecumseh 

Turlington 

Weepingwater* 

Wymore * 

York* 

Central Sec. 

Albion 

Ansley 

Ashton* 

Brokenbow* 

Callaway 

Central City * 

Dunning* 

Ericson * 

Genoa 

Gothenburg 

Grand Island 

Kearney * 

Lexington 

Loup 1 -' 

North Loup 

Ord' 



Ravenna 

St. Paul* 

Southwestern Sec. 

Alma* 

Arapahoe* 

Beaver City 

Benkelman* 

Bluehill* 

Curtis 

Franklin 

Haigler * 

Hastings* 

Holdrege * 

Imperial 

McCook* 

Madrid* 

Minden 

Redcloud * 

Republican * 

Wilsonville* 

Western Sec. 

Camp Clarke 

Gering 

Kimball 

Lodgepole 

Nesbit 

North Platte 

Seneca* 

Whitman* .'. 

Northwestern Sec. 

Alliance * 

Fort Robinson 

Hay Springs 

Kennedy 

Kirkwood * 

Springview 

Valentine 



Holt 

Washington . 

Platte 

Knox 

Dodge 

Cedar 

Dodge 

Boyd 

Madison 

...do 

Antelope — 

Douglas 

Holt. 

Knox 

Stanton 

Burt 

Dixon 

Cuming 



York 

Saunders — 

Nemaha 

Hamilton .. . 

Gage 

Saline 

Butler 

Richardson . 

Clay 

Jefferson 

Fillmore — 

Clay 

Thayer 

Lancaster 

Otoe 

Richardson , 

Seward 

Nuckolls — 

Johnson 

Otoe 

Cass , 

Gage 

York 



Boone — 
Custer . . . 
Sherman , 
Custer . . . 

...do 

Merrick . , 
Blaine — 
Wheeler.. 
Platte 
Dawson . 

Hall 

Buffalo.., 
Dawson . , 
Sherman , 
Valley . . 

...do 

Buffalo.. 
Howard.. 



1,442 
1,600 

1,203 

1,309 



1.58S 
I.53 2 

1,722 

1,103 
1,975 



1,472 
1,060 

1,387 
1,313 



Harlan 

Furnas 

...do 

Dundy 

Webster 

Frontier 

Franklin — 

Dundy 

Adams 

Phelps 

Chase 

Red Willow. 

Perkins 

Kearney 

Webster 

Harlan 

Furnas 



Cheyenne . . . 
Scotts Bluff 

Kimball 

Cheyenne . . . 

Logan 

Lincoln 

Thomas 

Grant 



Box Butte . . 

Dawes 

Sheridan — 

Cherry 

Rock 

Keya Paha . . 
Cherry 



1, 100 

1,051 
1,792 

1,235 
1,368 
1,619 

945 
1,722 

1,316 
1,633 
1,812 
1,458 
1,199 
941 
842 

1,435 
1,574 
1,113 
1,214 
1,080 
1,222 
1,642 

1,747 
2,307 
2,061 
2,477 
2,555 
1,708 
2,621 
2,029 
1,584 
2,557 
1,860 
2, 146 
2,385 
2,067 
1,961 



2,028 
1,796 

1,939 
2,173 
2,147 
2,968 
1,967 
2,553 
1,820 
3, 256 
1,932 
2,324 
3,278 
2,506 
3,294 
2, 169 
1,687 
1,939 
2,298 

3,7°° 



4,697 
3,820 



2,811 
2,971 
3,588 

3,968 
3.764 
3,821 



2,613 



Temperature, in degrees Fahrenheit. 



71.7 
74-3 
73-8 
71.9 
74.2 
73-2 
74-7 
73-0 
74-0 
73-8 
74.3 
76.9 
71-3 
75-5 
71-9 
74.8 
74.2 
76.4 

76.3 

76.6 
77-2 
78.0 
76.4 
75-4 
75-4 
78.0 



77-4 
74-5 
76.6 
76.9 
76.8 
76.2 
80.6 
75-2 
80.5 
75-6 
75-7 
72-5 
77-5 
76.4 

73-6 
73-8 
77-2 
76.6 
75-6 



75-6 
73-3 
76.6 
78. o 
73-6 
76.0 



74.6 
74-8 
76.6 

76.2 



78.4 
75-6 
79.0 
75-8 ; 
78.0 



a 

_ B 

2g 



—0.7 



+1.7 
+1.7 

+ 1-7 
+ 2.4 



+0.2 
+2.5 
+ 2.0 
+2.0 
+3-2 
+ 0.4 
+ 1.2 
+0.4 
+ 2.7 



+ 1-5 
+ ■•9 
+ 1-5 
+ 1.2 
+ 2.0 
+ 0.2 
+5-4 



+ 1-9 

+ 0.3 
+ 2.8 
+ 2.8 
+ 2.1 
+ 2-3 



—0.4 
+3-2 
+ 1.2 
+0.3 
+ 2-3 



+ 0.5 



+ 1-3 
+3-2 



+ 3-3 



+ 2.5 
— o. 1 
+4-4 
+ 2.4 
+ '•7 



+ 2.2 

+ 1-5 



76.4 



+4-0 
+0-3 
+3-o 
+ 0.3 
+3-6 



+3-o 



75-8 +■•! 

78.1 +0.7 

76.6 +1.8 

76.4 +3-3 



76.8 
77.1 

74-o 
71.0 

70.4 

71-2 

71.2 

73- o 
72.4 
70.9 

70.2 
71.0 
71.4 
70.6 
70.4 
70.4 
74.6 



+ ■•5 



—0.7 
0.0 
0.0 
+0.6 
+ 1.2 
+ 1.2 
+ 2.0 

+0.6 
+0.6 
+ 2.2 
—0.6 



—1-5 
+4-7 



107 



28+ 



22I 



CD ~ 

s 



46 



46 



55 



Precipitation, in inches. 



6.95 
6.18 
4-03 
4-73 
9.78 
3.10 
4-95 
9-25 
3-23 
2.98 
2.18 
6.18 
4.02 
4.80 
3-6i 
3.03 
3-31 
3-96 



2.05 
3.84 
2.43 
2.66 

4-97 
8.00 

3-89 
2.05 
5-54 
5-37 
3-50 
5-54 
2.64 

3.76 
3- 23 
2.89 
2.82 
1.85 



2-49 
4.62 

■•93 
3.78 
5-1° 
2-39 
3- " 
3-.SO 
2.03 
5-33 
5-55 

0.74 
o. 55 
1-45 
2-73 
[.42 
2-55 
2.65 
1-31 
3-51 



o-93 
2.90 
0.99 
2.89 
2.29 
0.70 
1-45 

2. 12 
2.24 

1.42 

°-55 
2.70 
1.83 
0.25 
4-58 

1.70 
1-55 
1.47 
5-19 
6.s8 
3-68 
2-59 



s 

2§ 



+4.64 
+ 2.40 
+0.77 
+ 2.41 
+6.12 
+0.16 



+6.72 
— 0.09 
— 0.76 
— 0.29 
+2.84 
+ 1.62 
+2.67 
+ 1.15 
—0.31 
+ 1.07 
+0.45 

—0.62 
+0.29 
+0.64 
+0.17 
+0.34 
+3- 16 
+3-31 
+ I-94 
—2-33 
— o. 10 

—1-35 
+0.67 

—0-75 
—0.42 
+ 1.71 
+3.22 
+ 1.06 
—0.81 
+ 1.85 
+ 2.45 
— 0.02 



+0.61 

+ 1-53 
+0.98 
+0.98 
— o. 10 
—1.07 



+0.35 
+ 1.69 
— 0.62 
+0.90 

+ 2.49 
+ 0. 12 
— 0.07 
+ 1. 10 
+0. 10 
+ 2.41 
+2-34 

— 2.20 

— 1.72 
— 0.69 
+ 0.71 

— 2.16 
+0.31 
— o. 19 

-1.06 

— 0.12 



-1.58 
+0.36 

—0.64 
— 0.67 

—0.05 

— 2.02 
— 1.40 



+ O.85 
+ 0.09 
-O.78 
+ 0.41 
-0-53 

—0.86 
+ 2.00 

+0.31 
+0.14 
— 0.29 

+3-H 
+3.86 
+ 1.42 
+0.36 



2.01 

2.43 
1.62 

1-52 
5-53 
0.71 
2. 12 
2.32 
1.65 
0.91 
0.69 
2.24 
1. 00 
1.92 
1.76 
2.03 
1-05 
0.90 

0.66 
1.89 
2.06 
1-5° 
i-53 
2. 10 
3.00 
1.50 
0.52 
1-31 
0.74 
1.04 
1. 10 
i-°5 
1.94 
4.00 
1-95 
115 
1.60 
2.16 
.81 
2.42 
1-50 

1-54 
1.86 
1.06 
1. 18 
1-25 



0.85 
2.53 
i-5i 
3.10 
2.65 
1 .90 
2. 12 

0-95 
0.76 
3-52 
1.85 

0.45 
o. 55 
0.50 
i-3° 
0.66 
2.00 
1.05 
1.06 
2. 16 



0.76 
1. 12 
0.50 
0.84 

1-25 
0.70 
0.71 

0-57 
o.53 
o-45 
0.30 
0.71 
0.56 
0.25 
1. 00 

0.70 
0.50 
o.37 
1-36 
3-05 
1.63 
0.70 



0.0 
0.0 



Sky. 



6 
s 



0.0 
0.0 
0.0 



CO 

S 



Tl ■ "O 
u& 3 

£-3 g 



£■0 
5f> 



se. 
se. 
se. 



se. 
se. 
sw. 



se. 
se. 



ne. 

se. 



sw. 
se. 



nw. 
sw. 



Observers. 



R.E.Bowden. 

E. A. Palmer. 

C.C.Gray. 

Dr. Geo. Roberts. 

Wm. J. Phillips. 

T.B. A. Watson. 

T.W.Lyman. 

C.C.Irwin. 

Dr. F.A.Long. 

Dr. P. H.Salter. 

G.S.Clingman. 

U. S. Weather Bureau. 

Chas. N.Cole. 

W.H.Hamlin. 

W.Gerecke. 

Dr. A. D. Nesbit. 

I. H. Weaver. 

C.J.Kadish. 

E.D.Smith. 

Dr.A.S. vMansfelde. 

G.D.Carrington. 

H.C.Miller. 

A. C. Zimmerman. 

Doane College. 

E.B.Taylor. 

M.L. Libbee. 

L.L. Fuller. 

W.F.Cramb. 

F.M.Flory. 

Dr. J. T. Fleming. 

Dr.C.M.Easton. 

U. S. Weather Bureau. 

E.Morton. 

W.F.Gingrich. 

L.E.Ost. 

L.W.Hahn. 

C.M.Miller. 

Wm.N. Hunter. 

G. Treat. 

H.B.Ware. 

O.P.Lowry. 



F. A.Pettinger. 
Chas. R. Hare. 
F. Rein. 
II. L.Ormsby. 
Geo.B.Mair. 
J.A.McRae. 
L. L. Williams. 
A.Dahl. 

Geo. S.Truman. 
A. V.Carlson. 
E.Corbin. 
C. E. Magner. 
Ira P.Griswold. 
E.S. Hayhurst. 
J. E.Goodrich. 
Jas. Milford. 
Erastus Smith. 
Paul Anderson. 



R.E. Pitcher. 
J F.Edwards. 
C.G.George. 
W.F. Winger. 
C.S. Draper. 
Dr. S.R. Razee. 
F.T.Owen. 
T.P.F. Haine. 
J.C.Swarts. 

C. Engstrom. 
Robert Malcolm. 
C.T.Watson. 
John McKenzie. 
Joel Hull. 

\\ m.S.Burdick. 
W. Bardon. 

D. K. Hostetter. 

Robt. H.Willis. 
J.P.Finlev. 
F. J. Bellows. 
A.B.Persinger. 
Grant E.Bolkcom. 
U. S. Weather Bureau. 
F.I). Gallup. 
D.McNall. 

J.Kridelbaugh. 
Post surgeon. 

C. A. Waterman. 

D. A.Piercy. 
Mrs.C. Arter. 
Miss Ezada Phelps. 
U.S. Weather Bureau. 



* Temperature data from thermometers not self registering. t Occurred on more than one day. \ \ % etc., indicate number of days missine from observed readings 
All records are used in determining Estate or district means, but State and district departures are determined by comparison of current data ot only stations with normals. 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



August, 1899. 



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CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



August, 1899. 


















Daily precipitation for Nebraska, 


Augrust, 1899 




























Stations. 


Day of month. 




■• 


2. 


3- 


4- 


5- 


6. 


7- 


8. 


9- 


10. 


11. 


12. 


•3- 


14. 


'5- 


16. 


•7- 


18. 


'9- 


20. 


21. 


22. 


23- 


24. 


25- 


26. 


27. 


28. 


29. 


3°- 


3'- 


CS 
O 




2.01 


<-°5 


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t 


1.27 


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t 








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t 




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6-95 
3.76 
1.70 

0.74 

3- 23 
2.17 

4-31 
5-28 
2.63 

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4.16 

1-45 
2-73 
6.18 
1.42 














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1.50 
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t 
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t 




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1.28 
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t 


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t 


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1.60 




t 


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Norfolk 


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t 


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t 






t 


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2 98 








3-5° 


North Platte 




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t 








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4.84 










1.76 
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"t" 


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2.24 








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t 


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O'Neill 


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1. 00 


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1.82 














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Thedford 










• '4 
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t 






+ 
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1. 10 






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1. 10 
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1.27 

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t 


t 
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3-96 
4.58 
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t 








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2.64 





































t Trace (when precipitation is less than o.oi of an inch). 






ttJ/1 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. 



REPORT FOR SEPTEMBER. 1899. 



NEBRASKA SECTION 



OF THE 



CLIMATE AND CROP SERVICE 



OF THE 



CO 



WEATHER BUREAU. 



PUBLISHED BY AUTHORITY OF THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE. 



UNDER DIRECTION W 



WILLIS L. MOORE 

CHIEF OF WEATHER BUREAU 



BY 



G. A. LOVEbAjMD, 

SECTION DIRECTOR, 

Office, University of Nebraska, Lincoln. 




*«ural History Lit 






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September, 1899. 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



8 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, 

CLIMATE AND CROP SERVICE 

OK THE 

WEATHER BUREAU. 

CENTRAL OFFICE: WASHINGTON, D. C. 



NEBRASKA SECTION, 

G. A. LOVELAND, Section Director, 

LINCOLN, NEBR. 



Vol. IV. 



LINCOLN, NEBR. 



No. 9. 



REVIEW OF THE CROP SEASON FOR 1899. 

The fall of 1898 was not favorable for fall-sown grain. 
The dry weather the last half of August and the first week 
of September retarded the growth of the small amount of 
seed in the ground. Heavy, general rains the second week 
in September placed the ground in excellent condition, and 
grain made good growth during the rest of the month. Low 
temperature in October retarded growth, and the last half 
of the month the minimum temperatures were near the 
freezing point and little growth was possible. November 
and December were both cold months, and wheat started 
the winter less firmly rooted than usual. January was a 
warm month, with less than the normal amount of snow. 
February and March were exceptionally cold, the ground 
remaining frozen nearly all the time until the first of April. 
Low temperature the first week in April prevented any sub- 
stantial progress in farm work, and the spring work on the 
farm in Nebraska in 1899 practically commenced with the 
second week in April, except in a few southwestern counties, 
where a little work had been done earlier in the season. The 
second and third weeks in April were exceedingly favorable 
for plowing and seeding, and most of the spring wheat was 
sown, the bulk of the oat crop placed in the ground, and con- 
siderable plowing for corn done during these two weeks. 
The next week was warm, with general showers, but they 
were not sufficiently heavy to retard farm work. At the end 
of the month small grain was mostly sown, and the bulk of 
the corn ground plowed. Fall-sown grain was seriously 
damaged by the severe winter, and the dry weather the first 
three weeks in April was exceptionally unfavorable for it. 
A large portion of the winter wheat was plowed up, and the 
land used for other crops. Spring-sown grain was also dam- 
aged by this dry weather; it started slowly and unevenly. 

The first half of May was comparatively dry, with temper- 
ature above normal. Rapid progress was made with corn 
planting, and in the southern counties most of the corn was 
planted by the middle of the month. The lack of rain was 
unfavorable for small grain, and weeds started faster than 
the grain. The last half of May was wet, but farm work 
was not seriously retarded. Corn planting was about com- 
pleted by the 25th. Corn came up nicely, and generally the 
stand was unusually good. 

June was a very favorable month for crops in all except 



the western counties. In the first and second decades in 
the western counties the dry weather was very unfavorable 
for small grain, but corn did not suffer, and pastures and 
ranges continued to furnish good feed for stock. 

The first half of July was exceedingly favorable for all 
growing crops. The temperature was slightly below normal 
and the rainfall generous and well distributed. Oats im- 
proved rapidly, and winter wheat filled and ripened well. 
Probably the corn crop of Nebraska never promised better 
than on the 15th of July, 1899. Potatoes also gave promise 
of a very large crop. The ten days from the 17th to the 
27th were dry, with only a few scattered showers in the 
State. The temperature was, however, below the normal, 
and while corn did not grow very fast, generally but little 
damage was done to the crop. In some places, however, 
serious damage resulted from the dry spell. This was an 
excellent period for harvesting, haying, and thrashing, and 
a large proportion of the grain was cut in fine condition. 
Generous and heavy showers occurred in all parts of the 
State during the last five days of July, greatly improving 
the condition of corn. 

The temperature during the first two weeks in August was 
almost continuously above normal, and, although showers 
were general and heavy, corn deteriorated in condition. 
Heavy, general rains on the 12th and 13th did considerable 
damage to grain in shock in eastern counties. The last half 
of August was dry, with only scattered showers, while the 
temperature continued high. These conditions were unfav- 
orable for the growth of corn in all except the small areas 
where the showers were sufficiently heavy to furnish plenty 
of moisture. Corn deteriorated in almost all parts of the 
State during the month. Late-planted corn, especially, ma- 
tured too rapidly. 

The hot, dry weather continued in September, and corn 
matured too rapidly, causing much chaffy corn, especially 
among the late planted. The dry weather retarded the fall 
seeding and the growth of seed in the ground. 



Errata for August. — Mean temperatures: Wilber should 
be 74.9°. Wilsonville, 78.1°. Departure: Wilsonville, +2.3. 



CLIMATOLOGY OF THE MONTH. 

General characteristics: The month was characterized by 
clear, dry weather, with the temperature slightly above nor- 
mal. In only one year (1888) since 1876 has the average 
rainfall for the State in September been less, and then only 
0.08 of an inch less. Most of the rain of the month occurred 
on the 7th. The maximum temperatures of the month were 
above normal, and occurred, with few exceptions, on the 5th 
or 6th. The minimum temperatures generally occurred on 
the 28th or 29th, when temperatures below freezing occurred 
in all parts of the State. The first frost of the fall occurred 
on the 13th and the first killing frost on the 16th in the 
western counties. 

Atmospheric pressure : The mean pressure was 30.03 inches, 
which is 0.01 of an inch above normal for September. The 
highest during the month was 30.41 inches, at Lincoln and 



4 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



September, 1890. 



Ashland on the 29th, and the lowest, 29.(55 inches, at Ash- 
land and North Platte on the 4th and Omaha on the 27th. 

Temperature: The mean temperature for the State, as de- 
termined from the records of 100 stations, was 64.4°, which 
is about 0.8° above the average of the past twenty-four years. 
The highest temperature was 108°, at Beaver City on the 
4th and Pleasanthill on the 5th, and the lowest, 17°, at 
Wakefield on the 29th. The mean daily range of tempera- 
ture, as computed from the records of 54 stations, was 83.0°. 
The greatest range at any station was 60°, at Kennedy on 
the 21st. 

Wind: The prevailing direction of the wind was from the 
southeast. The average velocity was 8.2 miles an hour, 
which is 0.8 of a mile below the normal. The highest was 
45 miles an hour from the northwest, at Lincoln on the 24th 
and Valentine on the 27th. 

Precipitation: The average precipitation for the State, as 
determined from the records of 182 stations, was 0.46 of an 
inch, which is 1.84 inches below the average for the past 
twenty-four years. The largest precipitation reported at any 
one station was 1.57 inches, at Oakdale, and the least, none, 
at a number of stations in the western portion of the State. 

Aurora: An aurora was observed on the 25th. 

Fog: Fog was reported on the 9th, 10th, 16th, 18th, 28d, 
and 26th. 

Hail: Hail fell on the 15th. 

Killing Frost: Killing frost was reported on the 16th, 17th, 
20th, 24th, 25th, 26th, 27th, 28th, 29th, and 30th. 

Light frost: Light frost was reported on the 13th, 15th, 
16th, 17th, 18th, 19th, 20th, 21st, 23d, 24th, 25th, 26th, 
27th, 28th, 29th, and 30th. 

Lunar halos: Lunar halos occurred on the 9th, 15th, 16th, 
26th, and 28th. 

Mirages: Mirages were observed on the 9th, 10th, 26th, and 
29th. 

Thunderstorms: Thunderstorms occurred on the 3d, 6th, 
7th. 12th, 13th, 14th, and 22d. 

Barometer, wind, and humidity table. 







Barometer. 




Wind. 






Humidity. 


Stations. 


5 

30.04 
30.04 
3°.°3 

3°- "3 


Highest. 
Date. 


Lowest. 
Date. 


c a 
_ 


CD 
M . 

u 2 
a> 

< 


Maximum 
velocity. 


c 

si 


EQ 

<a 
■S 

O 

►J 






S 


6 

V 

5 


* 
Q 


a 




3°-4i 29 
30.41 29 
30-32 25 
30. 3S 29 


2 9-°5 ; 4 
29.66 ; 4 
29-65 4 
29.65 1 27 








Lincoln 

North Platte . 


7,6.2 
5.907 
5,855 
7,060 


10.6 

8.2 

8.1 
9.8 


45 
35 
40 
45 


nw. 
nw. 
n. 
nw. 


24 
24 
24 
27 


57 
58 
65 


27 
24 
33 


2 5 
21 
6 












1 



COMPARISON OF PAST SEPTEMBERS. 

The monthly maximum and minimum temperatures for several sta- 
tions liave been obtained for the years 187G to 1888, and the following 
table has been revised, and differs slightly from the comparative tables 
previously published : 



Years. 



1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
r88i 
1882 
1883 
188 1 
18S5 
[886 
1887 
1888 
1889 



Temperature. 


Pre- 
cipita- 
tion. 








Mean. 


Max. 


Min. 


60.8 


91 


21 


3-63 


65.6 


95 


40 


2.06 


60.1 


96 


32 


1.90 


61.0 


91 


28 


1.40 


61.4 


93 


12 


2-74 


62.4 


IOI 


30 


3-77 


65.8 


97 


33 


0.92 


59 - 2 


94 


28 


2.04 


66.0 


94 


40 


1.66 


63.6 


96 


35 


1.76 


64-3 


103 


3" 


2.69 


63.2 


96 


30 


4.09 


63-4 


100 


26 


0.38 


59-3 


101 


24 


1.48 



Years. 



1 890 

1891 

1892 

'893 

'894 

1895 

1896 

'897 

1898 

'899 

Average for 
the past 24 
years 



Temperature. 


Mean. 


Max. 


Min. 


62.5 


104 


18 


66.8 


no 


30 


65.7 


110 


27 


64.7 


109 


19 


64.6 


101 


25 


68.0 


110 


20 


59-8 


102 


16 


70.6 


113 


29 


63.6 


104 


23 


64.1 


108 


'7 


63.6 


.0, 


26 



Pre- 
cipita- 
tion. 



0.99 
1.28 
0.48 
1 .02 
1.21 
■•39 
2.37 
1.26 
2.30 
0.46 



1.80 



Climatolog-ical data supplemental table. 



P. c 



63.0 
63.0 



67.8 



66.8 
67.2 



66.6 
65.9 



64. i« 



Means for the six equal sections of the State. 





Temperature. 


Precipitation. 


Number of days— 


Sections. 


Mean. 


Aver- 
age.* 


Mean. 


Aver- 
aged 


Rainy. 


Clear. 


Partly 
cloudy. 


Cloudy. 


Southeastern 


66.4 
63.6 
63.6 
66.5 
63.7 
62.6 

64.4 


66.5 
64.8 

64-5 
64.2 
62.8 
61.9 

64. 1 


0.68 
0.62 
0.73 
0.29 
0.20 
0.23 

0.46 


2.38 
2.52 
2.24 
1.88 
1. 14 
0.91 

1.84 


2. 1 

2. r 
2.0 

'•9 
1.0 

1. 1 

'•7 


19.6 
16.9 
20.3 
20.7 
21.8 
21.5 
20. r 


7-5 
10. 2 
6.9 
6.5 
5-6 
7.0 

7-3 


2.9 
3-o 
2.8 


Southwestern 


2.8 

2-7 

'•5 
2 6 


State 







Sections and 
stations. 



Northeastern. 

Bellevue 

Ewing 

Hubbard 

Lyons 

Monroe 

Schuyler 

Sioux City, Iowa 

Wisner 

Yankton, S. Dak 
Southeastern. 

Benedict 

Bradshaw 

Burchard 

Chester 

Clatonia 

Eden 

Fairfield 

Fairmont 

Hickman 

McCool Junct ... 

Marquette 

Nemaha 

Odell 

Osceola 

Palmyra 

Plattsmouth j 73.2 

Pleasanthill .... 66.3 

Salem | 66.6 

State Farm 

Strang 

Syracuse 

Tablerock 

Valparaiso 

Wilber 

Central. 

Burwell 

I Elba 

I Greeley 

Palmer 

St.Libory 

Southwestern. 

Bartley 

Culbertson 

j Haves Center... 

Ough 

Oxford 

! Sargent . . 

j Stratton 

Wallace 

i Wauneta 

! Wellfleet 

Western. 

Paxton 

Thedford 

i Willard 

i Northwestern. 

! Cody 

; Gordon 

j Johnstown 

j Merriman 

! Spragg 



Precipitation, in 
inches. 



69. 1 
67.4 
65.' 5 



67.9 
66.7' 



67.6 



* For ten years. 



t For twenty years. 



0.51 
0.00 



0.72 
0.50 
0.90 
0.26 

o-53 
0.02 

1.27 
1. 18 
0.82 
0.42 
1-43 
0.87 
0.50 
0.15 
0.53 



1. 16 
0.64 
■•52 
I. 10 
0.69 
0.46 
0.15 
0.80 



T. 
0.62 
1.24 



0.39 

0.54 
0.61 
1.05 
0.52 
0.52 

0.46 
0.03 
o. 12 
0.00 



0.32 
0.20 
0.20 
0.00 
0.80 



0.18 
o.57 



0.30 



So 



-2.69 
-0.95 



—1-52 



-0.55 
-1. 11 
-1.07 
-2.31 



-i-9t 
-1. 12 



-2.3' 
-0.85 
-2.13 
-1-54 



-0.71 
-2-43 
-'•37 
-0.61 
-1.48 
-2.69 



-2.28 
-'•74 
-'.31 



-'•73 
-0.57 



-o. 52 
-1.24 



-'•95 
-0.81 



-1.23 
-1.. SO 
-0.08 



Number of 
days— 





(A 




-c 


























>. 








u 


U 


X 







24 5 

'9 9 

15 I 7 

18 7 



'5 



25 I 3 
23 I 5 
10 I 17 



25 ! 4 

18 ' 10 

24 ! 2 

23 6 

22 7 

o I 30 

17 ! 8 



19 4 
19 ; 4 
22 ] 4 



nw. 
sw. 
nw. 



w. 
sw. 



Observers. 



E.F.Stouffer. 
G.H.Benson. 
M . M . Beacom . 
N.R.Kellam. 
Wm. Webster. 
L.N.Dickinson. 
Weather Bureau. 
Geo. W. Howe. 
Weather Bureau. 

R. B. Brabham. 
E.C.Roggy. 
J. A.Kinsey. 
W.J.KissicK. 

F. W.. Tones. 
D.. J. Wood. 
M. L.Jones. 
G.H.Borden. 
O.O.Franklin. 
F.E.Porter. 
John Ellis. 
R.J. Duff. 
I.B.Huffman. 

G. W. Murbarger. 
W.D.Bancroft. 
W.Z.Pickett. 

J. W. Ingles 
W.W.McDermet. 
S.W.Perin. 
S. Diller. 
L.Howell. 
S.H.Dopp. 
W.. I. Craven. 
S.E.Davis. 

W.S.Green. 
S.M.Wellman. 
J. A. Pinkerton. 
E.H.Smith. 
W.I. Meader. 

R.S.Baker. 

Mrs.L. A. Wiblev. 

R.C.Orr. 

Wm.Ough. 

Dr. L.M.Brady. 

J.S.Spooner. 

C.W.Shurtliff. 

H.S.Toogood. 

J.W.Hann. 

Wm.G. Hawkins. 

Frank N. Pearl. 
B.A.Darrow. 
Wesley W. Lewis. 

W.E.Pontius. 
Amos Burwell. 
(J. M.Heiney. 
F. Hussong. 
S.W. Spragg. 



September, 1899. 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



Climatological data for Nebraska, September, 1899. 



Stations. 



Northeastern Sec. 

Agee * 

Blair 

Columbus 

Creighton 

Fremont 

Hartington 

Hooper* 

Lynch 

Madison 

Norfolk 

Oakdale 

Omaha 

O'Neill 

Santee 

Stanton * 

Tekamah • 

Wakefield 

Westpoint 

Southeastern Sec. 

Arborville* 

Ashland 

Auburn 

Aurora * 

Beatrice 

Crete 

David City 

Dawson 

Edgar*. 

Fairbury 

Geneva 

Harvard 

Hebron 

Lincoln 

Nebraska City 

Rulo* 

Seward * 

Superior* 

Tecumseh 

Turlington 

Weepingwater * 

Wymore* 

York* 

Central Sec. 

Albion 

Ansley 

Ashton* 

Broken bow* 

Callaway 

Central City* 

Dunning* 

Ericson * 

Genoa 

Gothenburg 

Grand Island 

Kearney * 

Lexington 

Loup* 

North Loup 

Ord * 

Ravenna 

St. Paul* 

Southwestern Sec. 

Alma 

Arapahoe* 

Beaver City 

Benkelman* 

Bluehill* 

Curtis 

Franklin 

Haigler * 

Hastings* 

Holdrege * 

Imperial 

McCook * 

Madrid * 

Minden 

Redoloud * 

Republican * 

Wilson ville* 

Western Sec. 

Camp Clarke 

Gering 

Kimball 

Lodgepole 

Neshit 

North Platte 

Seneca* 

Whitman* 

Northwestern Sec. 

Alliance * 

Fort Robinson 

Hay Springs 

Kennedy 

Kirkwood* 

Springview 

Valentine 



Counties. 



Holt 

Washington . 

Platte 

Knox 

Dodge 

Cedar 

Dodge 

Boyd 

Madison 

...do 

Antelope 

Douglas 

Holt 

Knox 

Stanton 

Burt 

Dixon 

Cuming 



York 

Saunders. .. 

Nemaha 

Hamilton .. 

Gage 

Saline 

Butler 

Richardson . 

Clay 

Jefferson 

Fillmore — 

Clay 

Thayer 

Lancaster 

Otoe 

Richardson 

Seward 

Nuckolls — 

Johnson 

Otoe 

Cass 

Gage 

York 



Boone 

Custer . . , 
Sherman 
Custer . . . 

...do 

Merrick . , 
Blaine — 
Wheeler. . 
Platte.... 
Dawson . . 

Hall 

Buffalo... 
Dawson . . 
Sherman . 
Valley ... 

...do 

Buffalo... 
Howard . . 



Harlan 

Furnas 

...do 

Dundy 

Webster 

Frontier 

Franklin 

Dundy 

Adams 

Phelps 

Chase 

Red Willow. 

Perkins 

Kearney 

Webster — 

Harlan 

Furnas 



1,442 
1,600 
1,203 
i.3»9 



'.585 
1.532 
1,722 
1,103 
'.975 



1,472 
1,060 
1,387 
1,313 



1,100 
1,051 
1,792 
■,235 
1,368 
1,619 

945 
1,722 

1,316 
1.633 
1,812 
1,458 
1,199 
941 
842 

'.435 
1.574 
1.H3 
1,214 
1,080 
1,222 
1,642 

1,747 
2.307 
2,061 

2.477 
2,555 
1,708 
2,621 
2,029 
1,584 
2.557 
1,860 
2,146 
2,385 
2,067 
1,961 



2,028 
1,796 

1,939 
2,173 
2,147 
2,968 
1,967 
2,553 
1,820 
3,256 
1,932 
2,324 
3,278 
2,506 
3,294 
2, 169 
1,687 
1,939 
2,298 

3,800 



4,697 
3,820 



Cheyenne 

Scotts Bluff.. 

Kimball 

Cheyenne — 

Logan 

Lincoln j 2,841 

Thomas 2,971 

Grant 3,588 

Box Butte ... 3,968 

Dawes 3,764 

Sheridan I 3,821 

Cherry 

Rock 

Keya Paha... 

Cherry I 2,613 



Temperature, in degrees Fahrenheit. 



of, 

-a - 



64.0 
64.4 
64.2 
60.7 
63.8 
61.6 
62.7 
61.3 
63.6 
62.6 
62.4 
66.4 
60.7 
66.0 
61.6' 
64.4 
63.1 
66.0 

66.2 
67.0 
65.4 
63.1 
65-4 



64.0 
68.4 
70.7 
66.2 
65.2 
65-7 
67.4 
66.7 
65-9 
67.9 
65.6 
65-9 
65.5 
66.6 
61.3 
65.2 
65-4 

60.8 
62.0 
65.6 
58.6 
61.4 
65-4 



6 

5 
---4 
64.6 



69.6 
66.3J 



65.6 
67.1 
65.6 
67.0 
61.0 
66.6 
66.7 

63-5 
67.0 

65.7 
63-3 
62.9 
62.9 
64.0 
64.7 



s 

o_; 

a> - 
3 O 



—1.6 
— '•5 
—1.7 



—3-0 
—o-5 
— 1.0 
—0.9 
+ '•5 
—3-7 
+0.9 
—3-3 
—1. 1 



—0.9 

—0-5 
—2.9 

—3-3 
— 2. 1 



+ 0.9 



+ 1.6 
—2.0 
—0.9 
— o. 1 
+0.4 
—0.5 
—0-3 
—2.3 
—2.8 
—3-4 
— 1.4 
-i-7 
—3-0 



-2.0 



— 1.5 
—4-9 

— 1.1 



+ 1.4 
—0.8 
+ 1-3 
—3-7 
0.0 
—3-0 
+ 0.8 



—0.6 

—2-3 



+ 1.1 

+0.4 

+ 1.2 
-0-5 



—0.4 
—2.4 
-0.6 

—1-3 

-2.5 

+ 1.8 
— 1.2 
-0.9 

— O. I 



+0.9 
+0.4 

+ 1.6 
—0.4 
+ 1-7 



62.7 

63.6 

60.9 
62.0 
62.2 
60.8 
65.8 
63.1 



+ 2.1 



+ 0.9 
—0.3 



0.0 
+0.9 



30 



3t 



Precipitation, in inches. 



of. 

C - 



50 



65 



0-5I 
0-93 
o. 10 
0.61 

0.44 

1-53 
o. 17 
0.72 
0.86 
i-57 
o.53 
0.70 
T. 
0.41 

0-75 
0.97 
0.80 

I- 13 

0.58 
0.70 
0.90 
0.52 



a 

QJ — 
30 



teT3 



—1.32 

—1.03 
—1.44 

—1-25 
—0-93 



1. 10 
1.09 

o. 00 
0.58 
o. 17 

0.78 
0.39 

0-39 
0.92 

0-55 
0.20 
T. 
0.19 
°-75 
0.38 
1.46 
0-55 

0.83 
o-95 
0.89 
0.60 

o-75 
1.02 



0.56 
0.51 
0.60 

0-53 
0.85 
0.65 
1.36 
0.89 
0.63 

0.45 
0.74 



0-43 

T. 

o.39 

o-55 



0.00 
0.86 
0.70 
0.18 
0.20 
0.00 
0.90 

O. U) 

0.25 

0.00 

T. 

0. 19 
0.00 
0.00 
0.80 
0.28 
0.00 
0.00 

0.00 
0.50 
0.41 
0.00 
0.30 
0.30 
0. 10 



—'•33 
—0.77 
—2.03 
+ U.42 
—2.38 
— 0.96 
—1.48 
—0.87 
—0.88 
—0.49 
—0.98 

—o.55 
—1.80 

— 1.44 

— 1.46 
—1.30 



-0.70 
-1.66 
-2.31 
-1-52 
-1.83 
-1.00 
-1.77 
-1.44 
-2.23 
-2-77 
-1.49 
-2.36 
-2.03 
-1-32 
-2.20 



-1.09 



-0.38 
-0.86 
-0.83 
-0.27 
-0.87 



-0.88 
-2.14 
— 1. 00 
—1.08 
—1-53 
—0-75 
--1.18 
—0.51 
— 1.24 

—1-39 
— 1. 21 

—2.36 



— 1.60 
— 1. 12 
-1.78 
—0.86 



—0.92 

— 1.17 

— 1.62 
—0-73 
—1.82 
— 0.71 
-1.56 
—2.30 
—1-53 
—2.05 



—0-39 
—0.50 
—0.80 
—0.23 
— 1. 01 
—0.86 
—0.28 

—0.29 
—0.13 
—0.27 
— 0.76 
— 1. 11 
— 0.91 
—0.88 



0.08 
0.43 
0-93 
o. 10 

0-55 
o. 19 

1.00 

0.09 
0.70 
0.70 

1-53 

0.32 

0.70 

T. 

o-39 
0.62 
0.27 
0.80 

0-33 

0.52 

0-57 
0.70 
0.28 



1. 10 

0.65 

0.00 

0.22 

0.13 

0.66 

0.28 

0.34 

0.73 

0-33 

V 5 
T. 

0.16 

0.68 

0.36 

0.98 

0.45 

0.83 
0.85 
0.47 
0.60 

0.75 
1.02 



0.56 
0.47 
0.60 
0.47 
0.50 
o.35 
1. 18 
0.63 
0.63 
0.30 
0.62 

0.21 



0.34 

T. 

0.23 

0.55 



0.09 
0.25 
0.00 

T. 
o. 10 
0.00 
0.00 
0.60 
0.24 
0.00 
0.00 

0.00 
0.50 
0.41 
0.00 
0.20 
0.30 
0.04 



0.0 
0.0 



0.0 

0.0 



Sky. 



£■3 

E 
3 
fe5 




0.0 
0.0 
0.0 



0.0 
0.0 



.0 « 

a 



£•0 



2* 

a 



22 


2 


'9 


10 


27 


3 


22 


8 


27 
18 
21 


2 

9 
6 


H 


14 



-c c 

2* 



nw. 
nw. 
nw. 



nw. 
nw. 
nw. 



se. 

nw. 

n. 



n. 
sw. 

se. 



nw. 
sw. 



s. 
nw. 



nw. 
sw. 
se. 



s. 

nw. 

s. 

nw. 

se. 

nw. 



se. 

nw. 

s. 

e. 

nw. 

se. 

nw 

nw. 

nw. 

sw. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

s. 

n. 



Observers. 



R.E.Bowden. 

E. A. Palmer. 
C.C.Gray. 

Dr. Geo. Roberts. 

Wm. J. Phillips. 

T. B.A.Watson. 

T.W.Lyman. 

C.C.Irwin. 

Dr. F.A.Long. 

Dr. P. H.Salter. 

G.S.Clingman. 

U. S. Weather Bureau. 

Chas. N.Cole. 

W.H.Hamlin. 

W.Gerecke. 

Dr.A.D.Nesbit. 

I. H. Weaver. 

C.J.Kadish. 

E.D.Smith. 

Dr.A.S. vMansfelde. 

G.D.Carrington. 

H.C.Miller. 

A. C. Zimmerman. 

Doane College. 

E.B.Taylor. 

M. L.Libbee. 

L.L. Fuller. 

W.F.Cramb. 

F.M.Flory. 

Dr.J.T. Fleming. 

Dr.C.M.Easton. 

U.S. Weather Bureau. 

E.Morton. 

W.F.Gingrich. 

L.E.Ost. 

L.W.Hahn. 

C.M.Miller. 

Win. N. Hunter. 

G. Treat. 

H.B.Ware. 

O.P.Lowry. 

F.A.Pettinger. 
Chas. R. Hare. 

F. Rein. 
H.L.Ormsby. 
Geo. B. Mair. 
J.A.McRae. 
L. L. Williams. 
A.Dahl. 

Geo. S.Truman. 
A. V.Carlson. 
E.Corbin. 

C. E.Magner. 
Ira P.Griswold. 
E.S.Hayhurst. 
J.E.Goodrich. 
Jas. Milford. 
Erastus Smith. 
Paul Anderson. 

R.E. Pitcher. 
J F.Edwards. 
C.G.George. 
W.F. Winger. 
C.S. Draper. 
Dr. S.R. Razee. 
F.T.Owen. 
T.P.F. Haine. 
J. C.S warts. 
C.Engstrom. 
Robert Malcolm. 
C.T. Watson. 
John McKenzie. 
Joel Hull. 
Wm.S.Burdick. 
W. Bard on. 

D. K. Hostetter. 

Robt. II. Willis. 
J.P.Finlev. 
F.J. Bellows. 
A.B.Persinger. 
Grant E.Bolkcora. 
U.S. Weather Bureau. 
F.D.Gallup. 
D.McNall. 

J.Kridelbaugh. 

Post surgeon. 

C. A. Waterman. 

D.A.Piercy. 

Mrs.C.Arter. 

Miss Ezada Phelps. 

U.S. Weather Bureau. 



* Temperature data from thermometers not self registering. t Occurred on more than one day. a , '', c , etc., indicate number of days missing from observed readings. 
All records are used in determining State or district means, hut State and district departures are determined by comparison of current data of only stations with normals. 



i 






CLIMATE AND CHOPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



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fONH &i/, \0 
r^ r- r>«o N N 



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NvO NOXX xxxxx 



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5 > s 5fs 

a, — c « *- 
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• OOOjj 

ZZZZo 



• • & 

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S=S«j^ BBjfg'g 

CCE« r- r- r- > ? 



September, 1899. 






OS 
OS 
X 






a. 

z 
o 

< 



O 

ai 
- 

O 




AS 



CUM ATE AND CHOPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



September, 1899. 
















Daily precipitation for Nebraska, September, 


1899. 


























Stations. 


Day of month. 




i. 


2. 


3- 


4- 


5. 


6. 


7- 


8. 


9- 


10. 


11. 


12. 


'3- 


14. 


l.V 


16. 


>7- 


18. 


19. 


20. 


21. 


22. 


23- 


24. 


25- 


26. 


27- 


28. 


29. 


30. 


3>- 










t 




.01 

.83 




.08 














t 








.01 




























0. 10 

0.83 

0.00 
0.21 
°-95 
I.J3 
0.58 
0.70 
0.90 
0.46 
6.52 
0-43 

o-5> 
o-39 






























































































































t 


.21 


















t 
























































t 


. 10 














































•93 
■52 

t 

.28 

•34 














.20 

.02 

.08 
t 

.14 
• 03 














































.04 
•70 

.06 

t 
■43 














t 


t 










t 

•05 










































































.20 

• 03 










































.06 












.18 






































.04 






































































































































t 














t 


t 








t 




.16 


■04 










.04 
































•23 
.60 








































































































.82 
.18 
















































0.82 
°-54 
0-75 

t 








•M 








.08 

■75 
t 












.10 


.04 




































t 






t 






















































+ 
•93 














+ 
t 


t 
t 




t 


t 












































































o-93 
















.to 






















































































































•°3 

■55 
1. 10 
.65 


















































0.03 
0-55 






























































































t 
.06 


t 
i 












































•31 




.07 




















t 




















1.09 




















































































































00 
















•56 
.22 


















































0.56 

0.58 
0.50 


















■07 










•05 


.22 

•50 












.02 






















































































































































•55 
• 13 
•47 


















.06 












t 




















0.61 


















t 












.04 










+ 










































■04 




























































•°9 






. 10 




























°'5> 














t 


.60 

• 47 

t 


t 












t 




























0.60 


























.06 
•30 














































•75 














t 
































°-53 


























































1.05 




•15 












•19 
.66 


. 10 
















































0.00 




























.12 
































0.78 
0.86 
















.68 














.18 








































t 






t 


. 12 


























t 






















-t 


t 










• 41 

t 


































0.41 












.28 

.70 
•05 
■50 


•°5 












.06 












t 






























































0.39 
0.70 
0.18 
0.8s 




+ 
























.10 

• 15 


t 
.20 


• 03 






t 




































































































































































































0.00 
0.30 
0.65 
°-39 

O. OCJ 

1.36 
0.17 

0.72 
0.72 










. 10 






.20 
■35 
■32 














t 


t 






















































•3" 
■ 05 














































.02 












t 


+ 












t 




















































































1.18 
.08 
•72 
■70 
















.18 






































1 
t 




.eg 






















t 
















































































t 








.02 












t 




t 
































.Madrid 


































































































































t 


.84 














t 


.06 


t 
. 10 
































0.90 
0.92 
0.64 
0.80 
0.86 
0.89 
0.28 

' 57 
1.52 
o-53 
0.70 














•73 










t 












■09 


































.60 
.60 
t 

.63 
.24 
.60 


■ 04 










































.20 
.02 




















































Norfolk 


.01 








t 
•°5 


■70 












t 

t 

.02 


t 


.12 


t 












.01 
























































North 1'latte 






















.02 




































.04 






•93 














•30 


t 








t 




















Odell 








1.07 
t 




•15 














































•32 
.70 
1.00 






t 






t 










.21 




















O'Neill 






1 






























































.10 






























































































000 














.10 


.42 


















































0.52 
0.46 

0.45 
0.09 

0.55 
0-74 
f 














.46 




























































t 


•30 
.09 
■ 33 
.62 












. 12 


• 03 


t 

+ 

.22 
.04 














































t 


t 






































Uulo 


















































































.08 






























































t 












































•65 


















•25 


























































































00 
















• '5 
.20 


















•°5 
































































































Springriew 


■3° 








































































.02 


■39 












t 


















t 




















0.41 
t 














t 




t 
■°3 










t 
.16 


t 


















































































0. 19 
o-75 
















■05 
.18 
.68 


.62 














.08 






























Thedford 












































































t 












.07 
.02 












t 




















0.75 






.04 




.04 






































































































Wakefield 














•27 

t 
.80 


















.10 
.02 

t 
































0-37 
0.38 
0. 80 
















•36 
t 




t 






+ 
t 


t 














+ 


























t 






































































































•53 

■ 15 








t 






























t 












0-53 
0-55 










































.10 















































































t Trace (when precipitation is less than o.oi of an inch). 



[5\.05 

H tt h KUNOl? 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. 



REPORT FOR OCTOBER. 1899. 



NEBRASKA SECTION 



OF THE 



CLIMATE AND CROP SERVICE 



OF THE 



WEATHER BUREAU. 



PUBLISHED BY AUTHORITY OF THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE. 



UNDER DIRECTION OF 

WILLIS L. MOORE 

CHIEF OF WEATHER BUREAU 



BY 



G. A. LOVEhA^D, 

SECTION DIRECTOR, 

Office, University of Nebraska, Iiincoln. 




Natural 






30 



as 

O 

b 
o 



< 
> 

si 
as 

a, 

< 

a? 
&=■ 
X 

o 

>— « 

< 
Be! 



33 

— 

S5 
O 

a 













October, 1899. 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, 

Climate and Crop Service 

OF THE 

WEATHER BUREAU. 

CENTRAL OFFICE: WASHINGTON, D. C. 



^EB^AS^fl SECTION. 
O. A. LOVELAKD, Section Director, 

LINCOLN', NEIiR. 



Vol. IV. 



LINCOLN, NEBR. 



No. 10. 



EXTREME FLUCTUATIONS OF THE BAROMETER. 

In Symons's Monthly Meteorological Magazine for July, 
1899, the Editor gives some interesting records of high and 
low barometer readings. The attempt is made to give the 
extremes of pressure, reduced to sea level, observed by man 
anywhere on the land surface of the globe. High pressure 
areas often cover a vast extent of territory in Asia and the 
barometer here rises to a height unknown in any other part 
of the world, and the three highest records are from Siberia: 
Irkutsk, 81.780 inches; Ssemipalatinsk, 31.720 inches; and 
Barnaul, 31.620 inches. The next highest pressure occurred 
in the interior of North America, as reported from Swift 
Current, Assiniboia, 31.420 inches, which occurred on the 
14th of last February. The lowest reading occurred in a 
storm which swept over False Point, on the coast of Orissa, 
on the morning of September 22, 1885. The reading was 
27.135 inches. This reading is thoroughly authentic, and a 
verified standard barometer was used. 



NOTES. 

The dry, warm weather the first three weeks of October 
was exceptionally favorable for outstanding crops and for 
finishing fall work, with the exception of plowing and seed- 
ing. The soil was so dry during this period that very little 
plowing or seeding was done. Some wheat sown in Septem- 
ber came up and was injured by this dry spell, while consid- 
erable seed remained in the ground and did not sprout, or 
came up unevenly, until the rains in the eastern part of the 
State on the 15th, 24th, and 25th. Warm weather followed 
these rains, and fall-sown grain improved in condition rap- 
idly. Corn husking commenced unusually early, and al- 
though corn was broken down badly, rapid progress was 
made in securing the crop. 

The publication of the temperatures of the soil at differ- 
ent depths for each day commences with this month. The 
data will be found in a small table on page 6. The ther- 
mometers used are standard soil thermometers made by H. 
J. Green. The scale by which the temperature is read is 
above the ground, so that the thermometer need not be dis- 
turbed in reading. The tube of each is enclosed in a closely 
fitting wooden cylinder, which prevents the air from passing 
down around it and also the temperature of the mercury in 
the tube from being affected by the surrounding soil. The 



bulb at the bottom is uncovered. The observations are 
taken each evening just before dark. The surface of the 
ground above the thermometer bulbs is kept free of grass 
and weeds. 

Mr. Robt. H. Willis, voluntary observer at Camp Clarke, 
has moved 2| miles northwest of his former location, in- 
creasing the elevation of his instruments 100 feet. 



OBSERVERS' NOTES. 

Some wheat on low ground in fine condition, almost covering the 
ground. This wheat was sown September 12 to 16 on ground plowed 
August 26. The ground was in fine tilth when the wheat was sown. 
Wheat sown September 9 on ground plowed two days before came up 
fairly well, but is at a standstill. I am of the opinion that where one 
wishes to sow fall grain, especially in this section, the ground should 
be plowed in July, if possible, or as soon as the grain can be harvested, 
as that will give the ground a chance to settle and retain the moisture. 
After the plowing is finished, the ground should be thoroughly pulver- 
ized, and after each rain it should be harrowed in order to form a 
mulch over the surface and thereby prevent evaporation. I believe in 
this for the reason that a dry spell often occurs iu the forepart of 
September, which is very hard on fall-grain sown on fresh plowing.— 
S. W. Peein, State Farm, Lincoln. 

Tornado reported at or near Chapman, 11 miles east of here on 
October 15. Several houses were moved, blacksmith shop destroyed, 
corn cribs demolished, out buildings turned over, trees uprooted, and 
a girl, fourteen years old, killed by flyingbrick from chimney. — E. Cok- 
bin, Grand Island. 

On October 2 my stable was struck by lightning and burned with 
contents, including hay, grain, tools, four horses, and two cows. From 
the stable the fire spread to two wooden granaries near by. The 
house plot is 80 yards square, and the burned building stood on the 
southwest corner. There are two rows of ash and maple trees of ten 
years 1 growth on the north and east sides of plot, and on east half of 
south side a tall hedge of Russian mulberry. Along the west and north 
sides there is a wire fence. The wire on the west side was about three 
feet from the stable. There was not much rainfall. The gage was 
destroyed, but rainfall estimated at .05 of an inch. — John Ellis, Mar- 
quette. 

CLIMATOLOGY OF THE MONTH. 

General characteristics: The month was characterized by 
clear, dry, warm weather. The average rainfall for the State 
as a whole was only about two-thirds the normal amount, 
and this was badly distributed. Most of the rain fell in the 
last week of the month and in the eastern portion of the 
State. In most of the southeastern section this rain was 
more than the normal monthly amount, and the average for 
this section shows an excess of one-half inch. The north- 
eastern section is but slightly below normal. Iu the west- 
ern, central, and southwestern sections very little rain fell, 
and at many stations none at all. The maximum tem- 
perature for the month was above normal, and at several 
stations in the eastern portion of the State the 12th was the 
hottest day recorded in October since the establishment of 
the station. The minimum temperatures were about or 
slightly above normal. Several days with high wind occurred 
during the month, especially the 12th, 15th, 22d, and 23d, 
when the wind was quite steady from 25 to 35 miles per 
hour. 

Atmospheric pressure : The mean pressure was 30.01 inches, 
which is 0.00 of an inch above normal for October. The 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



October, 1899. 









highest, during the mouth was 30.49 inches, at Valentine 
on the 4th, and the lowest, 29.51 inches, at Ashland on the 
9th. 

Temperature: The mean temperature for the State, as de- 
termined from the records of 99 stations, was 53.0°, which 
is about 2.9° above the average of the past twenty-four years. 
The highest temperature was 98°, at Beaver City on the 1st 
and Tecumseh on the 23d, and the lowest, 11°, at Gering on 
the 81st and Callaway on the 16th. The mean daily range 
of temperature, as computed from the records of 53 stations, 
was 31.2°. The greatest range at any station was 64°, at 
North Loup on the 28th and Lexington on the 26th. 

Wind: The prevailing direction of the wind was from the 
southwest. The average velocity was 8.1 miles an hour, 
which is 0.1 of a mile below the normal. The highest was 
38 miles an hour from the south, at Lincoln on the 23d. 

Precipitation: The average precipitation for the State, as 
determined from the records of 133 stations, was 1.00 inch, 
which is 0.54 of an inch below the average for the past 
twenty-four years. The largest precipitation reported at any 
one station was 4.90 inches, at Eden, and the least, none, 
at a number of stations in the central and southwestern por- 
tions of the State. 

Aurora: An aurora was observed on the 5th. 

Fog: Fog was reported on the 11th, 18th, 19th, 21th, 25th, 
20th, 27th, 29th, and 30th. 

Hail: Hail fell on the 14th, 15th, and 24th. 

Lunar halos: Lunar halos occurred on the 13th, 14th, 16th, 
18th, 20th, 22d, and 23d. 

Meteor: A meteor was seen on the 23d. 

Mirages: Mirages were observed on the 5th, 6th, 7th, 19th, 
20th, 21st, 23d, 27th, 28th, 29th, 30th, and 31st. 

Parhelia: Parhelia were reported on the 15th and 17th. 

Rainbows: Rainbows were noted on the 2d, 24th, and 26th. 

Thunderstorms: Thunderstorms occurred on the 2d, 14th, 
15th, 16th, 23d, 24th, 25th, and 28th. 

Barometer, 'wind, and humidity table. 





Barometer. Wind. 


Humidity. 


Stations. 


c 

V 


en 

V 
.C 


6 
O 


O 

O 
►-1 


— 

a 


<0 

> 

S a 
— * 




O 
ft 

» 

< 


Maximum 
velocity. 


a 
» 


44 
00 

0) 

O 

►J 






E0 

i 




0) 

u 

R 


-— 

(3 


♦J 

O 




29.99 
29.99 
30. 02 

30. CO 

30.04 


30.42 

JO- 42 

30-47 
30.40 

3°-49 


4 

4 
4 
4 
4 


29.5I 

2 9-S3 
29.57 
29.52 
29.52 


9 
9 
1 
9 

1 


















Lincoln 

North Platte . 


8, 5 c8 
5.46o 
6,792 
6,821* 


II. 3 

7.2 
9-0 
9.1 


38 
34 
36 
33 


9. 

nw. 

n. 


23 

1 
2 

7 


62 
65 


24 
21 
25 


5 
I 

5 








| 



* Record for ten hours missing. 
Means for the six equal sections of the State. 





Temperature. 


Precipitation. 


Number of days- 


Sections. 


Mean. 


Aver- 
age.* 


Mean. 


Aver- 

age.t 


Rainy. 


Clear. 


Partly- 
cloudy. 


Cloudy. 


Southeastern 


59.6 
54-7 
53-7 
54-5 
47-9 
47-3 
53-0 


5i.« 
50.9 
50.2 
5'- 6 
49-3 
48.3 
5°-4 


2-93 
1.26 

0.39 
0.26 

0.37 
0.80 

1.00 


2.36 
1.69 
1.36 
1-37 
1.09 
1. 12 

1-50 


3-7 
5-2 

2-5 
1.0 
2.8 

3-4 
3-" 


15-9 

'5-9 

!l"..9 

•t-3 
16.0 
16.3 

16.2 


9-3 
8.1 

8.0 

9-7 
8.2 
6.9 

8.4 


5-8 
7-' 
6.1 




5-0 


State 


7-9 
6.4 





COMPARISON OF PAST OCTOBERS. 

The monthly maximum and minimum temperatures for several sta- 
tions have !>een obtained for the years 1870 to 1888, and the following 
table has been revised, and differs slightly from the comparative tables 
previously published : 



Years. 



1876 
.877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
.884 
.885 
1S86 
1887 
1S88 



Temperature. 


Pre- 
cipita- 








Mean. 


Max. 


Min. 


tion. 


48.2 


81 


22 


0.98 


46.4 


76 


23 


2.92 


48.3 


87 


11 


°-39 


54-2 


89 


20 


1.03 


46.7 


88 





1.78 


51.1 


85 


25 


3-42 


54-7 


82 


22 


2.23 


4b. 


89 


14 


3.58 


54-8 


87 


14 


■•71 


48.6 


88 


9 


1.80 


54-5 


96 


16 


0.86 


45-2 


93 





0.88 


47-7 


86 


12 


o-93 


51-5 


9' 


11 


°-93 1 

i 



Years. 



893 
894 
895 
896 
897 
898 
899 



Average for 
the past 24 
years 



Tem 


perature. 


Mean. 


Max. 


Min. 


50-1 


92 


R 


50.7 


92 


17 


53-0 


90 


12 


50. 


95 


10 


52.4 


92 


16 


48.1 


91 


1 


47-9 


9' 


12 


53-5 


98 


16 


46.9 


97 


6 


53-° 


98 


11 


50.1 


91 


13 



Pre- 
cipita- 
tion. 



0-93 
1.96 
1. 71 
o-3' 
1.21 
0.22 
1.83 
3-34 
0.90 
1. 00 



1-54 



Climatolog-ical data— supplemental table. 



Sections and 
stations. 



a a 

~ 0> 



a ? 

S" 



54.2 



54-o 



63-4 



59-o 
=S.6 
65.8 



57-7 
63.0 



* For ten years. 



t For twenty years. 



Northeastern. 

Bellevue 

Ewing 

Hubbard 

Lyons 

Monroe 

Schuyler 

Sioux City, Iowa 

Wisner 

Yankton, S.T)ak 

SOUTHEASTERN. 

Benedict 

Bradshaw 

Burchard 

Chester 

Clatonia 

Eden 

Fairfield 

Fairmont 

Hickman 

McCoolJunct. . . 

Marquette 

Nemaha 

Odell 

Osceola 

Palmyra 

Plattsmouth 

Pleasanthill — 

Salem 

State Farm 

Strang 

Syracuse 

Tablerock 

Valparaiso 

Wilber 

Central. 

Burwell 

Elba :.... 

Greeley 

Palmer 55. 

St. Libory | 57.2 

Southwestern. 

Bartley 

Culbcrtson 

Haves Center... 

Ough 

Oxford 

Sargent 

Stratton 

Wallace 

Wauneta 

WellHeet 

Western. 

Paxton 

Thedford 

Willard 

Northwestern. 

Cody 

Gordon 

Johnstown 

Meniman 

Spragg 



66.5 
59- 1 
59-6 
59-8 
61.2 



61.8 



58.6 



53- o 



Precipitation, in 
inches. 



3-23 



0.89 
0.62 
1-75 
1-33 
1-47 
0.66 

0-93 
1. 81 
3-12 
3.65 
3- 80 
4.90 
1-3° 
3-12 
3- 25 
1. 81 



4-35 
3-95 
0.42 

3-39 
3-99 
3.20 

2-55 
2.51 
3-63 
4.12 
3-57 



3-U 

0.00 
0.20 
1. 00 
0.12 

0.40 

T. 

0.23 
T. 

0.00 



0.20 
0.07 
0.15 
0.00 
0.80 



O. II 

0.37 



0.80 
T. 
0.00 
1.25* 



6 



=> 2 



CD -^ 



+ I.2I 



—0.34 
—0.28 
—O.9O 
— O.64 



— O.96 

+ 1.C6 



+ 2.03 
— 0.72 
— 0.16 
+ 1.31 



+ 1.67 
+ 1.38 
-1.63 
+ I-53 
+ 1-43 



+0.63 
+ 0.24 
+ 0.67 
+ 1.61 
+ 1.25 



+ 0.46 

— '•25 
—2.15 
+ 0.06 
— 0.96 
—1-39 



-1. 41 
-0.8 1 



-0.94 
-1.56 



-0.80 



Number of 
days— 



w. 

sw. 



n. 
sw. 



sw. 

s. 



nw. 
sw. 
sw. 



nw. 

s. 
s. 



w. 

sw. 

ne. 



Observers. 



E.F.Stouffer. 
G.H.Benson. 
M.M.Beacom. 
N.K.Kellam. 
Wm. Webster. 
L.N.Dickinson. 
Weather Bureau. 
Geo. W.Howe. 
Weather Bureau. 

R.B. Brabham. 

E.C.Roggy. 

J. A.Kinsev. 

W.J.Kissick. 

F.W.Jones. 

1).. T.Wood. 

M.L.Jones. 

G.H.Borden. 

O.O.Franklin. 

F.E.Porter. 

John Ellis. 

R.J. Duff. 

I.B.Huffman. 

G. W.Murbarger. 

W.D. Bancroft. 

W.Z.Pickett. 

J. W. Ingles 

W.W.McDermet. 

S.W.Perin. 

S.Diller. 

L.Howell. 

S.H.Dopp. 

W.J.Craven. 

S.E.Davis. 

W.S.Green. 
S.M.Wellman. 
J. A.Pinkerton. 
E.H.Smith. 
W.I.Meader. 

R.S.Baker. 

Mrs.L.A.Wibley. 

R.C.Orr. 

Wm.Ough. 

Dr. L.M.Brady. 

J.S.Spooner. 

C.W.Shurtliff. 

H.S.Toogood. 

J.W.Uann. 

Wm. G.Hawkins. 

Frank N. Pearl. 
B. A.Darrow. 
Wesley W. Lewis. 

W.E.Pontius. 
Amos Burwell. 
G.M.Heiney. 
F. Hussong. 
S.W. Spragg. 



* First eight days missing. 






October, 1899. 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



Climatology eal data for Nebraska, October, 1809. 



Precipitation, in inches. 



Stations. 



Counties. 



Northeastern Sec. 

Agee * 

Blair 

Columbus 

Creighton 

Fremont 

llartington 

Hooper * 

Lynch 

Madison 

Norfolk 

Oakdale 

Omaha 

O'Neill 

Santee 

Stanton* 

Tekamah 

Wakefield 

Westpoint 

Southeastern Sec 

Arborville* 

Ashland 

Auburn 

Aurora * 

Beatrice 

Crete 

David City 

Dawson 

Edgar* 

Fairbury 

Geneva 

Harvard 

Hebron 

Lincoln 

Nebraska City 

Kulo* 

Seward * 

Superior* 

Tecumseh 

Turlington 

Weepingwater * 

Wymore* 

York* 

Central Sec. 

Albion 

Ansley 

Ashton* 

Broken bow* 

Callaway 

Central City* 

Dunning* 

Ericson * 

Genoa 

Gothenburg 

Grand Island 

Kearney * 

Lexington 

Loup* 

North Loup 

Ord * 

Kavenna 

St.Paul* 

Southwestern Sec 

Alma 

Arapahoe* 

Beaver City 

Benkelman* 

Bluehill* 

Curtis 

Franklin 

Haigler* 

Hastings* 

Holdrege * 

Imperial 

McCook * 

Madrid * 

Minden 

Kedcloud * 

Republican* 

Wilsonville* 

Western Sec 

Camp Clarke 

Gering 

Kimball 

Lodgepole 

Nesbit 

North Platte 

Seneca* 

Whitman * 

Northwestern Sec 

Alliance * 

Fort Robinson 

Hay Springs 

Kennedy 

Kirkwood* 

Springview 

Valentine 



Holt 

Washington . 

Platte 

Knox 

Dodge 

Cedar 

Dodge 

Boyd 

Madison 

...do 

Antelope 

Douglas 

Holt 

Knox 

Stanton 

Burt 

Dixon 

Cuming 



York 

Saunders 

Nemaha 

Hamilton ... 

Gage 

Saline 

Butler 

Richardson . 

Clay 

Jefferson. ... 

Fillmore 

Clay 

Thayer 

Lancaster 

Otoe , 

Hichardson , 

Seward 

Nuckolls 

Johnson 

Otoe 

Cass 

Gage 

York 



Boone 

Custer 

Sherman . . 

Custer 

...do 

Merrick . . . 

Blaine 

Wheeler... 

Platte 

Dawson . . . 

Hall 

Buffalo.... 
Dawson . . . 
Sherman . . 
Valley — 

...do 

Buffalo.... 
Howard . . . 



Harlan 

Furnas 

....do 

Dundy 

Webster 
Frontier .... 

Franklin 

Dundy 

Adams 

Phelps 

Chase 

Red Willow. 

Perkins 

Kearney .... 
Webster — 

Harlan 

Furnas 



Cheyenne . . . 
Scotts Bluff. 

Kimball 

Cheyenne . . . 

Logan 

Lincoln 

Thomas 

Grant 



Box Butte . . 

Dawes 

Sheridan 

Cherry 

Rock 

Keya Paha . . 
Cherry 



1,442 
1,600 
1,203 
1,309 



1,585 
1 , S3 2 
1,722 
1,103 
1,975 



1,472 
1,060 
1,387 
i,3'3 



1,100 
i,°5i 
1,792 
1,235 
1,368 
1,619 

945 
1,722 
■,3'6 
i,633 
1,812 
1,458 
1,199 
941 
842 
1,435 
1,574 
1,113 
1,214 
1,080 
1,222 
1,642 

1,747 
2,307 
2,061 

2,477 
2,555 
1,708 
2,621 
2,029 
1,584 
2, 557 
1,860 
2,146 
2,385 
2,067 
1,961 



2,028 
1,796 

1,939 
2,173 
2,147 
2,968 
1,967 
2,553 
1,820 
3,256 
1,932 
2,3 2 4 
3,278 
2,506 
3,294 
2, 169 
1,687 
1,939 
2,298 

3,800 



4,697 
3,820 



2,841 
2,971 
3,588 

3,968 
3,764 
3,821 



2,613 



Temperature, in degrees Fahrenheit. 



of. 

S3 - 

tit. 
O O 



53-4 
57-o 
55-5 
51.8 
57.6 
53-2 
55-7 
53-2 
54-9 
53-8 
52.6 
59-6 
51.1' 
53-1 
52.8 
55-8 1 
54-2 
58.6 

60.2 
59-6 
61.8 
54-7 
59-4 
59-° 
55-7 
63.6 
60.6 
60.4 
55-8 
57-2 
59-8 
59-5 
60. 6- 
59-4 
58-4 
61.1 
60.0 
60.2 
54-1 
54-4 
55-0 

54-4' 
52.7 
54-8 
47-1 
50.2 
53-4 



55-9 
51.8 
56.8 
54-3 
53-3 
51-6 
55-3 
52.1 
54-2 
55-2 

58.4 ( 
53- o 
57-1 
49.8 
58-5 
52.8 



58.8 
55-7 



50.6 
52-9 



57-4 
54-6 
50.0 
54-2 

48.3 
45-2 
46.2 
47-8 
48.8 
51-0 



46.3 
43-8 
40.9 
48.2 
49. o 



49.6 



a 

v a 



+4-2 



+4.0 
+4-6 
+5.8 
+3-5 



+ 5-2 
+5-8 
+4-3 
+4-1 
+6.7 
+ 1-7 
+2-3 
+ 2.6 
+3-6 



+7-4 
+5-3 
+6.2 

+3-3 

+ 5-4 
+ 5-9 
+6.7 



+6.9 
+5-8 
+3.0 
+5-9 
+6.2 

+ 5-3 
+7-8 
+ 3-7 
+4-1 
+6.7 
+5-5 
+6.2 
+3-6 



+ 2.4 



+4-3 
+ 3-9 



+0.8 
+ 2-5 



+6.1 
+0.6 
+6.1 
+ 1.2 
+ i-3 
+ 1-9 
+4-9 



+3-o 
+ 2.9 



+3-6 
+1.1 

+ 5-3 
+ 1.0 



+3-6 
—0.4 



+5-8 



+ 1.4 
+ 2.7 



-3-6 
— 2.0 



—0.4 
+ 1.1 



+2.6 

0.0 
-4-6 
+0.6 

0.0 



+ 0.6 



93 



lot 



23 



23 



22 



93 

88 i2t 
88 I ut 
92 



94 I 



32 



58 



59 



49 



OR 

- c _- 



I-3I 
1.62 
0-95 
0.40 
0.78 
1-45 
0.92 
0.76 
i-'3 
°-95 
0.88 
2.26 

0-33 
0.49 

1-93 
0.97 
1.84 
1-53 

0-95 
2.47 
4-32 
1. 00 

3-35 
2.98 
2.05 
3-54 
1-57 
3-66 
2.92 
1-33 
3-3o 
2.58 
3-61 
1-75 
2. 12 
3-90 
3-62 
4-05 
3-14 
4.18 
i-3i 

0.84 

o.44 
0.28 
0.42 
o.45 
0.00 



0.20 
0.81 
0.50 
1. 11 
o.45 
o. 11 
0.00 
0.20 
0.20 
0.58 
0.78 

0.40 
0.00 
0.02 
T. 
0.77 
0.15 



0.00 
0.46 
0.00 
o. 19 
T. 
0.14 

0.45 
1.88 
0.30 
0.00 

o.74 
1. 19 
0.58 

T. 
0.42 
0.28 
0.00 

T. 

0.50 
1.70 
0.78 
0.30 
1. 09 



0.98 



a 
Si 

M 

a 



— o. 15 
—0.66 
—0-53 
— 0.76 
— 1. 41 
—0.05 



— 0.46 
— 0.41 
—0.34 
—o.34 
— 0.21 
—0.87 
— o-93 
+0.42 
—0.74 
—0.30 
+ 0. 11 

— 1. 10 

+ 0-35 
+ 2.92 
— 0.60 
+ 0-93 
+ 0.89 
+ 0.05 
+0.08 
— 1. 00 
+ 1.24 

+ 0.49 
—0.94 
+ 1.32 
+0.66 
+0.71 
+0.07 
+0.03 

+ 1-75 
+ 1.01 
+ 1.68 
+0.62 



—0.43 

—0.87 

—1. 01 

— i. 13 

— 1.72 
—0.73 
—1-53 



— I.I8 
—0.75 
—1.06 
—0.81 
— 1.20 
—1.03 

— 1.66 
—1. 18 
—1-52 
— 0.90 

— 1.07 



— 1-55 
— 1.06 
— 0.91 

— 1.54 
— 1.29 



-0.74 
—1-77 
—1-35 
— 0.64 
—1.24 
—0.50 
—1.48 
+0.31 
— 1.02 
—1. 16 



+0-57 
+0.02 
—0.49 
— 0.90 
—0.78 
— o. 18 
— 0.60 

+0.20 
+0-39 
— o, 21 
—0.84 
—0.32 



+0.08 



o 

O 



0. 10 

i -°s 
0.44 

o. 16 
0.44 
0-45 
o.45 
0.29 
0.49 

o.35 
0.42 
1.24 
o. 11 
0.16 
0.90 
0.60 
0.92 
0.60 

0.48 
1.70 
3.42 
o.57 
2.70 
2.62 

1-15 

2.85 
1-25 
3.02 
1.82 
1. 11 
2.99 
2.27 
2.92 
1. 00 

1.50 
1.60 
2.60 
3- 16 
2.36 
3.10 
0.91 

0.46 
o. 12 
0.14 
o. 19 
0.20 
0.00 



o. 10 

0.30 

0.20 
O.48 
0.45 
O.06 
00.0 
0.20 
0. IO 
O.25 
0.52 

O.40 
0.00 

0.02 
T. 
0.52 

o-i5 



0.00 
0.21 
0.00 
0.14 
T. 
0.14 
0-39 
1.38 
0.30 
0.00 

0.40 
0-37 
0.28 

T. 
0.42 
0. r4 
0.00 

T. 

0.50 

0.50 
0.40 
0.17 
0.90 



0.27 



o " 

£» 

"a 



0.0 
0.0 



0.0 
0.0 



0.0 
0.0 



0.0 
0.0 



0.0 
0.0 



0.0 
0.0 
0.0 



T. 
T. 
T. 



0.0 
0.0 



0.0 
5-o 



jg-S 

a 
3 

S5 



Sky. 



jd-c 



1. 1-. 

I" 



J2 

o to 

%£ 

a 

■2 

-A 



%* 



nw. 
se. 
ne. 
n. 



nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

s. 

n. 

se. 

sw. 

se. 

nw. 



nw. 
n. 



sw. 
sw. 



ne. 
se. 
se. 



sw. 
se. 
s. 
se. 



nw. 

sw. 

nw. 

se. 

n. 



s. 

nw. 

ne. 



nw. 
nw. 
n. 



se. 
ne. 
ne. 



s. 
nw. 



nw. 

sw. 

nw. 

n. 

s. 

sw. 

sw. 

nw. 

nw. 

s. 

w. 

ne. 

nw. 



ne. 

sw. 

n. 

nw. 

nw. 



w. 



Observers. 



R.E.Bowden. 

E. A. Palmer. 

C.C.Gray. 

Dr. Geo. Roberts. 

Wm. J. Phillips. 

T. B.A.Watson. 

T.W.Lyman. 

C.C.Irwin. 

Dr. F.A.Long. 

Dr. P. H.Salter. 

G.S.Clingman. 

IT. S. Weather Bureau. 

Chas. N.Cole. 

W. II. Hamhn. 

W.Gerecke. 

Dr. A. D. Nesbit. 

I. II . Weaver. 

C.J.Kadish. 

E.D.Smith. 

Dr. A. S. v Mansfelde. 

G.D.Carrington. 

H.C.Miller. 

A.C.Zimmerman. 

Doane College. 

E.B.Taylor. 

Mrs. Ira Draper. 

L.L. Fuller. 

W.F.Cramb. 

F.M.Flory. 

Dr. J. T.Fleming. 

Dr.C.M.Easton. 

U. S. Weather Bureau. 

E.Morton. 

W.F.Gingrich. 

L.E.Ost. 

L.W.llahn. 

C.M.Miller. 

Wm.N. Hunter. 

G. Treat. 

H.-B, Ware. 

O.P.Lowry. 

F. A.Pettinger. 

Chas. It. Hare. 

F.Rein. 

H.L.Ormsby. 

Geo.B.Mair. 

J.A.McRae. 

L.L.Williams. 

A.Dahl. 

Geo. S. Truman. 

A. V. Carlson. 

E.Corbin. 

C.E.Magner. 

IraP.Griswold. 

E.S.Hayhurst. 

J.E.Goodrich. 

Jas. Milford. 

Erastus Smith. 

Paul Anderson. 

R.E. Pitcher. 
J F.Edwards. 
C.G.George. 
W.F. Winger. 
C.S. Draper. 
Dr. S.R. Razee. 
F.T.Owen. 
T.P.F.Haine. 
J.C.Swarts. 
C. Engstrom. 
Robert Malcolm. 
C.T. Watson. 
John McKeuzie. 
Joel Hull. 
Wm.S.Burdick. 
W.Bardon. 
D.F. Hostetter. 

Robt. H.Willis. 
J.P.Finley. 
F.J. Bellows. 
A.B.Persinger. 
Grant E.Bolkcom. 
U. S. Weather Bureau. 
F.D.Gallup. 
D.McNall. 

J.Kridelbaugh. 

Post surgeon. 

C. A. Waterman. 

D.A.Piercy. 

Mrs.C.Arter. 

Miss Ezada Phelps. 

U.S. Weather Bureau. 



* Temperature data from thermometers not self registering. t Occurred on more than one dav. », \ «, etc., indicate number of days missing from observed readings. 
All records are used in determining State or district means, but State and district departures are determined by comparison of current data of only stations with normals. 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



October, 1899. 






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1 










CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



October, 1899. 


















Daily precipitation for Nebraska, 


October, 1899 




























Stations. 


Day of month. 




i. 


2. 


3- 


4. 


5- 


6. 


7- 


8. 


9- 


10. 


11. 


12. 


'3- 


14. 


'5- 


16. 


17- 


18. 


■9- 


20. 


21. 


22. 


23- 


24. 


25- 


26. 


27. 


28. 


29. 


30. 


31- 


09 

O 






•*3 














t 


.06 
■ 14 

t 


.04 


t 




.... 


.08 
• 24 

t 




.10 












•°5 


.03 
















'•31 
0.84 
0.50 
0.40 
0.44 

o-95 
2.47 
4-32 






.46 








































T 
.40 

.12 












t 


t 


t 


t 




•5° 






























































t 
. 10 


t 
































.08 


.04 












. 10 


















































•47 
•07 
















.48 
1.70 
3-42 

•57 


















.13 
















t 


t 








•34 
■83 
•37 










t 




t 


•23 


















.02 

t 




























•°5 
.06 


























































































t 






t 
.26 




























t 
3-35 






.IO 
.02 














■ °3 






















2.70 


.26 
































t 
















































































t 
t 
•52 
















f 


Blair 






•05 














t 


.01 








t 
•25 


•45 


"t" 


.02 




t 








1.05 


.04 


t 










1.62 

0.77 
0.42 
3-12 












































.15 














.08 










•19 














t 
'•55 


























































.72 












































































•t° 5 














. 10 
t 


.40 
t 
05 

t 


t 

.07 

t 

.„. 








.20 
.08 


• 37 
"t 


t 
.04 














. 10 
















o.45 
74 

o-95 


















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t 
.02 


.02 




.11 


t 




























■44 






















.14 


t 
















.14 


















.16 
.36 


■°3 












































t 












t 


2.62 














2.98 
0.23 
0.15 
2.05 
3-54 


























•23 




























t 

• IS 
















t 


•15 
































































•75 




















I- 15 

2.85 


















t 


,t 












• 07 


+ 






.07 


•5" 


















.04 




























































.04 
























.20 

t 
• 30 




















1.25 


.08 












1-57 






. 10 
■ 17 
•3° 














.10 




t 




































































3-02 


•17 














3-66 
1.70 
















•25 


•5° 


.40 


•05 




.20 






















































































t 

• 13 
.20 

t 


















t 








.28 
.90 

• 25 

t 










t 








.06 
1.82 
•30 


• 44 
.07 














0.78 
2.92 


















t 


t 
•°3 

1° 








t 


t 








































.06 


.01 

t 


• 37 


• °3 
.18 










.02 






























• 31 
.12 




• 09 


• 03 






















1. 19 
0.50 




























.20 
.10 




















.22 














t 
t 






.48 


















•30 


.01 
















•5° 














•25 


t 






■25 


























00 
































































.40 














.07 


.02 


•05 








•13 


•°5 


• °5 












•23 
1.07 
















1-45 
1-33 
0.46 






.08 


















• 14 












.04 
•13 


















.12 
























.21 


























































































t 
.16 


t 










t 


• 25 


.40 


t 


t 


• 13 


t 


t 
•15 




t 


t 




























0.78 
3-30 
























•50 


2.49 










































































t 
















• 14 


•05 






t 


















t 


















0.19 

0.45 
0.30 
0.58 
1.69 






















•45 




















































•17 

t 
•05 








•13 


















































.28 
.10 

t 


.06 

.02 


•15 


.09 


t 
.42 






































• 15 
.06 

t 


















■°5 












.90 
.05 
































































.08 












t 

t 










•13 


.10 


"it' 


t 










.08 


2. 19 














2.58 
t 


















t 


t 


























































































































































.18 
.20 














t 


t 
. 12 












•43 


t 












t 


•15 


.28 
•13 


t 












0.89 
1. 13 
0.14 


















.04 

.14 








•49 












































































































































.06 


























•39 


















t 
















0.45 
3.6i 
4-35 
0.42 

0-95 






.02 












• 03 


t 










•57 


















.07 




































.60 


















3-75 








































.42 


















t 
.03 

t 
.01 
.10 




















• 25 














. 12 


.02 








•35 




.01 












• •7 






























.20 

t 
t 








t 

. 10 
.26 
























North Platte... 




.02 
.42 














• 14 
.08 


.01 
.01 


"t" 


t 




















t 
































• 44 
■58 
t 


.01 


























88 


Odell 




.01 
.09 
























2-75 
1.24 


•75 
.02 












3-95 




















t 
.06 










.02 
•32 




t 












• 31 
















.11 










t 


.02 






■ 03 










.11 


t 












0-33 

0.42 



























.10 
















































































• 23 
















t 


t 
















































.14 






















...3 
















2.30 

t 


.42 














3-99 

0.58 
1.88 






• 25 

t 














•°5 


•03 








■25 
•5° 
.20 
■52 
































t 




































1.38 
1. 00 






























t 

t 








•■5 




















.40 












1-75 
0.78 
0.49 
'■75 






• 19 
.10 
















.02 






















• 05 

.04 
















•°5 
• 25 












.01 






.16 






• 13 










































•05 






•35 
















1. 10 












































































. 12 
* 














+ 












•50 










t 




.50 


1.50 


t 


















* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


.20 




•05 




•5° 
























1.25 












































.18 














■ 17 












.90 
•55 


















.68 
1.50 
















1-93 
3-9° 
3.62 
0.97 






• 25 






































1.60 

2.60 

•35 










































.65 
•35 
















•37 


















.02 








































•25 












Thedford 


















. 11 
t 
•23 












































.c6 












.02 
.08 










•71 
.16 




















3.16 


.10 












4- 05 

0.98 






t 












.27 


.08 




• 04 




. 12 














t 


























































.21 
















.16 

•03 

t 


•05 
•03 








.92 


















.50 

t 
■55 
















1.84 
3-14 
1-53 

t 






•■5 












t 








.60 




t 












2.36 
t 


t 


































.60 






























































.24 
.20 




















• 05 




.80 
. 10 




















•23 

.10 














i-47 
'•3' 










































•91 







































































Record missing. 



t Trace (when precipitation is less than 0.01 of an inch). 









OF THE 

I 'ERSITY of 



*?'' 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. 



REPORT FOR DECEMBER. 1899. 



NEBRASKA SECTION 



OF THE 



CLIMATE AND CROP SERVICE 



OF THE 



WEATHER BUREAU. 






PUBLISHED BY AUTHORITY OF THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE. 



UNDER DIRECTION OF 

WILLIS L. MOORE 

CHIEF OF WEATHER BUREAU 



BY 



G. A. LiOVEhAHD, 

SECTION DIRECTOR, 

Office, University of Nebraska, Lincoln. 



Natural \ 












OS 
GO 



O 



25 



> 

05 
a, 

25 
<5 

S 
03 
H 
M 
H 
O 

GG 

I— I 

25 

>< 
W 

25 

O 

s 




1 



cO 

CVJ 



J 



December, 1899. 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



I . S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, 

Climate and Crop Service 



WEATHER BUREAU. 

CENTRAL OFFICE: WASHINGTON, D. C. 



NEBRASKA SECTION, 
G. A. LOVELAND, Section Director, 

LINCOLN, NEBR. 



Vol. IV. 



LINCOLN, NEBR. 



No. 12. 



TEMPERATURE EXTREMES. 

(Taken from " Symons's Monthly Meteorological Magazine," for October, 1899.) 

"Difficult as it was to obtain comparable and accurate 
data as to barometric pressure, it is much more so to obtain 
trustworthy data as to temperature. Six's thermometer 
was not invented till the end of last century, and it is 
overstating the case rather than the reverse, to put the gen- 
eral use, throughout the world, of maximum and minimum 
thermometers much earlier than 1850; and, without regis- 
tering thermometers, the recorded extremes can be regarded 
only as approximations. Moreover, the positions in which 
thermometers were placed differed greatly. The Glaisher 
pattern thermometer stand dates only from 1840, the Law- 
son from 1845, the Stevenson only from June, 1864. The 
Montsouris, as its name implies, can not have been intro- 
duced before that observatory was founded, which was about 
1871. And even now, in 1899, no uniformity of exposure 
in different countries exists, and there are few comparative 
series enabling strict comparisons to be made. We shall 
not consciously quote any inaccurate or doubtful figures, 
but as in all cases we indicate whence the statements are 
derived, we can be held responsible only for their correct re- 
printing. 

"We have found that so much repetition and alteration of 
the wording of the various writers would be required to 
bring the statements into perfectly systematic arrangement, 
that we have thought it best to leave them all verbatim; but, 
roughly, statements as to high temperatures come first, and 
low ones follow. Also, as far as possible, records from 
neighboring countries are put together. 

DOCTOR BUCHAN'S ISOTHERMS. 

" The plate devoted to yearly mean temperature prepared 
by Doctor Buchan, F. R. S., and published in one of the 
1 Challenger ' volumes, gives no yearly isotherm higher than 
85°; of these there are three, the largest covering a large por- 
tion of central Africa bounded on the north by latitude 18° 
N., turning southeastward near Suakin, including Massowah 
and Mocha, but not Aden, and then running SSW. to about 
150 miles south of Victoria Nyanza. This map therefore 
gives no support to the extreme temperature so often men- 
tioned at the southern end of the Persian Gulf; and on the 
monthly maps for the hot months also we fail to trace it. 



Doctor Buchan also gives two small areas of 85°, one in cen- 
tral India about latitude 15° N., and the other in the north- 
ern portion of South Australia in about latitude 15° S. and 
longitude 130° E. 

"As regards cold, Doctor Buchan assigns the lowest yearly 
mean temperature to an area surrounding the north pole, 
but for the winter months he shows that far lower temper- 
atures occur in latitude 65° N. and longitude 132° E., to 
which, for January, he assigns the frightful mean temper- 
ature of — 60° Fahrenheit, i. e. 92° below freezing point, and 
21° below the temperature of frozen mercury. 

EXTREMES OF TEMPERATURE. 

"'The absolute range of the Northern Hemisphere, and 
doubtless of the world, is 217.8°, depending on the absolute 
maximum of 127.4° at Ourgla, Algeria, July 17, 1879, and 
the absolute minimum of — 90.4° at Werchojansk, on 
the Jana River, Siberia, latitude 67° 34' N., longitude 183° 
51' E., January 15, 1885. It was once questioned if the 
human body could undergo, unharmed, such enormous tem- 
perature changes, and the question is now answered in the 
affirmative, although probably no person has ever experi- 
enced the entire range.' — From "American Weather," by 
General Greeley, page 121. 

(To be continued.) 



NOTES. 

As the record for Curtis was incomplete and the tempera- 
ture for the days entered disagreed with that at surrounding 
stations, the report has not been used except in the table on 
page 8. 

December has been an excellent month for completing 
corn husking and other fall work on the farm. While the 
ground has been covered with snow but a small portion of 
the time, the weather has been mild, and fall-sown grain 
has not been injured. 



LATE REPORTS. 

Page 8. — Seneca's rainfall reading, 0.00, should be 0.20 on the 19th; 
0.10 on the 21st; 0.04 on the 23d; 0.10 on the 30th; total for month, 0.44. 

Page 5. — Seneca, monthly precipitation, departure, and greatest in 
24 hours, 0.00, —0.18, 0.14, should read 0.44, +0.19, 0.20. Central City, 
monthly precipitation, departure, and greatest in 24 hours, trace, 
—0.63, trace, should read 0.98, —0.25, 0.70. 

Page 4. — Burchard, monthly precipitation and departure, 0.05. 
—0.56, should read 0.50, —0.02. 



CLIMATOLOGY OF THE MONTH. 

General Characteristics: December, 1899, is best charac- 
terized as about a normal month. The temperature was 
slightly below normal, and the precipitation averaged 
slightly above, being decidedly above normal in the east- 
ern sections and below in the western. Most of the precipi- 
tation occurred as rain on the 8th to 12th inclusive, but 
snow was quite general on the last seven days of the month. 
There was no period of severely cold weather, and the mini- 
mum temperatures were below zero on only a few days, and 
in the southern counties the lowest temperatures were gener- 
ally slightly above zero. 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



December, 1809. 









Atmospheric pressure: The mean pressure was 30.20 inches, 
which is 0.02 of an inch above normal for December. The 
highest during the month was 30.76 inches, at Lincoln on 
the 19th, and the lowest, 29.61 inches, at Omaha on the 2d. 

Temperature: The mean temperature for the State, as de- 
termined from the records of 96 stations, was 25.5°, which 
is about 0.3° below the average of the past twenty-four yearB. 
The highest temperature was 66°, at Lexington on the 1st, 
and the lowest, 20° below zero, at Valentine on the 14th. 
The mean daily range of temperature, as computed from the 
records of 55 stations, was 23.2°. The greatest range at any 
station was 55°, at Lodgepole on the 1st. 

Wind: The prevailing direction of the wind was from the 
northwest. The average velocity was 8.2 miles an hour, 
which is 0.2 of a mile above the normal. The highest was 
40 miles an hour from the north, at Lincoln on the 3d. 

Precipitation: The average precipitation for the State, as 
determined from the records of 133 stations, was 0.84 of an 
inch, which is 0.15 of an inch above the average for the past 
twenty-four years. The largest precipitation reported at any 
one station was 2.25 inches, at Clatonia, and the least, 0.08 
of an inch, at Imperial. 

Snowfall: The average snowfall (in inches) for the several 
sections was as follows: Southeastern, 4.1 ; northeastern, 
2.4; central, 4.2; southwestern, 1.3; western, 3.8; north- 
western, 4.2. The average for the State, as determined from 
the records of 114 stations, was 3.3. 

Coronse: Coronse were observed on the 6th, 7th, 8th, and 
16th. 

Fog: Fog was reported on the 2d, 5th, 6th, 8th, 9th, 12th, 
13th, 19th, 26th, 27th, 28th, 29th, 30th, and 31st. 

Halos: Lunar halos were observed on the 6th, 8th, 13th, 
14th, and 15th and solar halos on the 15th and 27th. 

Parhelia: Parhelia were observed on the 13th, 17th, 20th, 
21st, 22d, 23d, 24th, 25th, 28th, and 29th. 

Sleet: Sleet fell on the 2d, 3d, 12th, 15th, and 29th. 

Barometer, wind, and humidity table. 



COMPARISON OF PAST DECEMBERS. 

The monthly maximum and minimum temperatures for several sta- 
tions have been obtained for the years 1876 to 1888, and the following 
table has been revised, and differs slightly from the comparative tables 
previously published : 



Years. 



1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
18S0 
1881 
[882 
1883 
[884 
1885 
[886 
1887 
1 888 





Barometer. 


Wind. 


Humidity. 


Stations. 


d 


44 

m 

» 

JS 

5 


■s 
a 


+3 

DO 


■3 


6 
45 


& 

u 



Eh 


- 3 
<a 


Maximum 
velocity. 


c 


O 






OQ 


6 


s 


• 
- 


s 
ca 




30.19 
30.19 
30.23 
30.17 
30.24 


30-75 
30.76 
30-75 
30.70 
30.72 


19 

19 

'9 
19 

■9 


29.62 
29.62 
29.77 
29.61 
29.83 


2 
2 
2 

2 


















Lincoln 

North Platte . 


7,589 
5.426 
6,783 
5,877* 


to. 2 
7-3 
9-i 
7-9 


40 

36 

35 
36 


n. 

nw. 

n. 

s. 


3 
23 
3 

25 


77 
71 
79 


47 
30 
36 


5 
23 
23 













* Record for three hours missing. 
Means for the six equal sections of the State. 





Temperature. 


Precipitation. 


Number of days- 


Sections. 


Mean. 


Aver- 
age.* 


Mean. 


Aver- 
age.t 


Rainy. 


Clear. 


Partly 
cloudy. 


Cloudy. 




26.4 
23.6 
25.6 
27.9 
26.2 
23.1 
25-5 


26.5 
30.0 
26.7 
29.0 
28.9 
27-5 
28.1 


1.46 
1. 12 

■•15 
0.48 

°-37 
0.49 

0.84 


0.85 
0.74 
0.69 
0.73 
0-53 
0-59 
0.69 


5-7 
6-3 
2.8 
2-7 

4-2 

3-8 
4-2 


10.8 
9-4 
10.2 
12.6 
12.8 
tl.l 
11. 2 


8-9 
II. 8 
9.2 
8.2 
10.6 
10.9 

9-9 


11. 3 
9-9 
11. 6 




10.2 
7-6 
9.0 

9-9 







* For ten years. 



t For twenty years. 



Temperature. 


Pre- 
cipita- 








Mean. 


Max. 


Min. 


tion. 


19.6 


62 


-25 


0.24 


32.8 


63 


— 2 


1.85 


19.2 


67 


—16 


0.44 


i5-7 


57 


-27 


0.58 


16.9 


74 


—26 


0.62 ! 


32.5 


59 


— 9 


0-57 


22.8 


62 


— 21 


1. 01 


25.6 


65 


—14 


1.04 


14.4 


65 


— 18 


0.90 


31- 1 


74 


— 13 


0.94 


20.7 


87 


— 18 


0.81 


21.9 


59 


-29 


0.71 


30.8 


70 


— 7 


0.45 


36.1 


80 


—14 


o.37 



Years. 


Temperature. 


Mean. 


Max. 


Min. 


1891 

1892 

1893 

1894 

1895 

1896 

'897 

1898 

1899 

Average for 
the past 24 


32.5 
3>-3 
23- 3 
27.6 
29.9 
28.1 
34-o 
22.9 

23-5 
25.5 

25.8 


82 
80 
80 
7' 
77 
68 
70 
68 
83 
66 

70 


— 10 
— 22 

—23 
—16 
— 20 
—12 
— 10 
—26 
— 22 
— 20 

—18 



Pre- 
cipita- 
tion. 



0.13 
1-13 
0.61 
0.89 
0.43 
0.15 
0.23 

1.31 

0.32 

0.84 



0.69 



Climatologrical data— supplemental table. 



Sections and 
stations. 



Northeastern. 

Bellevue 

Ewing 

Hubbard c 

Lyons 

Monroe 

Schuyler 

Sioux City, Iowa 

Wisner 

Yankton, S. Dak 
Southeastern. 

Benedict 

Bradshaw 

Burchard 

Chester 

Clatonia 

Eden 

Fairfield 

Fairmont 

Hickman 

McCool.Iunct... 

Marquette 

Nemaha 

Odell 

Osceola 

Palmyra 

Plattsmouth — 
Pleasanthill — 

Salem 

Strang 

Syracuse 

Tablerock 

University Farm 

Valparaiso 

Wilber 

Central. 

Burwell 

Elba 

Greeley 

Palmer 

St.Libory 

Southwestern. 

Bartley 

Culbertson 

Haves Center... 

Ough 

Oxford 

Sargent 

Smithfield 

Stratton 

Wallace 

Wauneta 

Wellfleet 

Western. 

Paxton 

Thed ford 

Willard 

Northwestern. 

Cody 

Gordon 

Johnstown 

Merriman 

Spragg 



of » 

3 a 



23.0 
23.0 



25.0 

ioio 



26.7 
28.0 



28. h 

25.4 
26.6 
27.7 

28.5 



26.8 
25.4 



Precipitation, in 
inches. 



c o 



g 

o_: 

*• - 

c-5 



1.63 j +0.14 

0.58 1 — O. IO 

2.00 

35 +o.37 



+ 0.65 
+0.36 



+ 0.25 



+ 0.49 
+0.84 



+0-54 
+0.71 
+ 0-55 
+ 0.59 
+0.15 
+0.66 
+0-75 
+0.66 



+ 0.21 

+ 0-95 
+0.64 
+ 0.81 



+ 0.78 



• 95 I +0-33 

.86 ! +0.86 

.28 : +0.79 

.00 i +0.29 

.67 j +0.83 



Number of 
days— 



0.15 • 
0. 11 



■0.24 
o. 11 j —0.12 
o. 10 1 — 0.23 



0.86 



o. 14 
0.20 



+ 0.19 



— 0. 12 
—0.05 



0.70 — 0.12 
0.17 : 



O.25 ;. 
0. IO |. 

0.81 I. 



5 o 



nw. 
nw. 



8. 

sw. 



n. 
nw. 



nw. 
nw 



nw. 
nw. 
nw. 



n. 
nw. 



n. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

n. 

nw. 



nw. 
nw. 



Observers. 



E.F.Stouffer. 
G.H.Benson. 
M.M.Heacom. 
N.R.Kellam. 
Wm. Webster. 
L.N. Dickinson. 
Weather Bureau. 
Geo. W. Howe. 
Weather Bureau. 

R.B. Brabham. 

E.C.Roggy. 

J.A.Kinsey. 

W.J.Kissick. 

F.W.Jones. 

D.J.Wood. 

M.L.Jones. 

G.H.Borden. 

O.O.Franklin. 

F.E.Porter. 

John Ellis. 

R.J. Duff. 

I.B.Huffman. 

G.W.Murbarger. 

W.D.Bancroft. 

W.L.Pickett. 

J. W. Ingles. 

J. E. Hart. 

S.Diller. 

D.W. Vanllorne. 

S.H.Dopp. 

S.W.Perin. 

W.J.Craven. 

S.E.Davis. 

W.S.Green. 
S.M.Wellman. 
J. A.Pinkerton. 
E.H.Smith. 
W.I.Meader. 

R.S.Baker. 

Mrs.L.A.Wibley. 

R.C.Orr. 

Wm.Ough. 

Dr. L.M.Brady. 

J.S.Spooner. 

Geo.C. Junkin. 

C.W.Shurtliff. 

H.S.Toogood. 

J.W.Hann. 

Wm. G.Hawkins. 

Frank N. Pearl. 
B. A. Harrow. 
Wesley W.Lewis. 

S. A.Ballenger. 
Amos Burwell. 
G. M. Heiney. 
F. Hussong. 
S.W. Spragg. 






-■^ 



December, 1899. 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



Climatologrical data for Nebraska, December, 1899. 



Stations. 



Northeastern Sec. 

Agee * 

Blair 

Columbus 

Creighton 

Fremont 

Hartington 

Hooper * 

Lynch 

Madison 

Norfolk 

Oakdale 

Omaha 

O'Neill 

Santee 

Stanton * 

Tekamah 

Wakefield 

West-point 

Southeastern Sec. 

Arborville* 

Ashland 

Auburn 

Aurora * 

Beatrice 

Crete 

David City 

Dawson 

Edgar* 

Fairbury 

Geneva * 

Harvard 

Hebron 

Lincoln 

Nebraska City 

Kulo* 

Seward * 

Superior* 

Tecumseh 

Turlington 

Weepingwater * 

Wymore* 

York* 

Central Seo. 

Albion k 

Ansley 

Ashton* 

Brokenbow* 

Callaway 

Central City * 

Dunning* 

Ericson* 

Genoa 

Gothenburg 

Grand Island 

Kearney* 

Lexington 

Loup* 

North Loup 

Ord * 

Ravenna 

St. Paul 

Southwestern Sec. 

Alma 

Arapahoe * 

Beaver City 

Benkelman* 

Bluehill * 

Curtis 

Franklin 

Haigler* 

Hastings* 

Holdrege* 

Imperial 

McCook * 

Madrid * 

M i mien 

Redcloud * 

Republican* 

Wilsonville* 

Western Sec. 

Camp Clarke 

Gering 

Kimball 

Lodgepole 

Nesbit 

North Platte 

Seneca* 

Whitman* 

Northwestern Sec. 

Alliance * 

Fort Robinson 

Hay Springs 

Kennedy 

Kirkwood * 

Springview 

Valentine 



Counties. 



Holt 

Washington. 

Platte 

Knox 

Dodge 

Cedar 

Dodee 

Boyd 

Madison — 

...do 

Antelope 

Douglas 

Dolt 

Knox 

Stanton 

Burt 

Dixon 

Cuming 



York 

Saunders 

Nemaha 

Hamilton .. 

Gage 

Saline 

Butler 

Richardson 

Clay 

Jefferson. .. 
Fillmore — 

Clay 

Thayer 

Lancaster 

Otoe 

Richardson 

Seward 

Nuckolls 

Johnson . . . 

Otoe 

Cass 

(•age 

York 



Boone 

Custer . . . 
Sherman . 
Custer . . . 

...do 

Merrick . . 

Blaine 

Wheeler.. 
Platte.... 
Dawson . . 

Hall 

Buffalo. . . 
Dawson . . 
Sherman . 
Valley . . . 

— do 

Buffalo... 
Howard.. 



Harlan 

Furnas 

...do 

Dundy 

Webster .... 
Frontier .... 

Franklin 

Dundy 

Adams 

Phelps 

Chase 

Red Willow. 

Perkins 

Kearney 
Webster — 

Harlan 

Furnas 



Chevenne . . . 
Scotts Bluff. 

Kimball 

Cheyenne . . . 

Logan 

Lincoln 

Thomas 

Grant 



Box Butte . 

Da wes 

Sheridan ... 

Cherry 

Rock 

Keya Paha. 
Cherry 



ioo 
°5i 
792 
235 
368 
619 

945 

7--' 
,3l6 
633 
812 
,458 
199 
94 1 
Si; 
435 
,574 
,"3 

-'!■» 

( o8o 

,222 

,642 

1,747 
2,3&7 
2,061 
2,477 
2,555 
1,708 
2,621 
2,029 
1,584 
2,557 
1,860 
2,146 
2,385 
2,067 
1,961 



2,028 
1,796 

>,939 
2,173 
2,M7 
2,968 
1,967 
2,553 
1,820 
3,256 
1,932 
2,3 2 4 
3,278 
2,506 
3,294 
2,169 
1,687 
1,939 
2,298 

3,800 



4,697 
3,820 



2,841 
2,971 
3,588 

3,968 
3,764 
3,821 



2,613 



Temperature, in degrees Fahrenheit. 



♦"■a 

a o 



23.6 
23-9 
25.8 
20.8 
25-4 
20.3 
23-5 
23.8 

24- 3 
23.2 
22.6 
25-7 
23.2 

23-1 
21.8 

25.4 

22.9 
24.6 

26.0 

25.6 

26.6 

25.8 

25-9 
28.9 
24.1 
28.6 



26.2 
26.4 
25.0 
27.6 
25.8 
25-7' 
29.2 

2Q.8 

28.0 
26.0 
25.2 

22. S 
21.6 

25,3 

24-5 
24.8 
2.5-4 
24.9 

27-5 
25-4 



24.4 
26.9 
26.8 
25.9 
27.2 
25.6 
24.7 
23.0 
25-7 
2.5-7 

28.4 
28.6 
30.2 
27.6 
23. o 1 



28.0 
30.2 

24.6 

30-3 
28.4 
29.7 
26.8 
25.8 

28.2 
28.6 

27-5 

26.8 
27.2 
28.4 
26.2 
25.7 
27-5 
22.6 
25-4 

24.8 
26.0 
23.8 
23-4 
19.8 



B 



—1-5 



—1-5 
—2.6 
+0.2 
—2.9 



—0.8 
— 0.2 
—0-3 
-3-8 
— 1.0 
— 2.2 
+ 1.7 
— 2.2 
—0.8 



—2-3 

— !. I 

-3-8 
—2.8 
—2.7 
+ 1.2 

— 2.[ 



-2.2 
-2.7 
-2-3 
-2-7 

-3-5 



-1. 1 
-3-7 
-2.9 
-o-3 
-3-2 



-2.8 



-3-6 
—0.7 

—3-9 

+ 0.1 

—3-0 



0.0 
-2.6 
-3-8 
-3° 
-2.2 
-1.6 
-2.8 



"3-5 
-3-4 



—1.6 
—1.6 



—2.9 



20.8 



—1.8 

+ 2-9 
—6.0 

—1-7 
0.0 

—2.4 
0.0 

+0.3 

—1.4 



-3-7 
—0.3 
—0.4 

— 1-3 
0.0 

—4-3 
—o-3 

— 0.2 
—2.5 
— 2.2 
—5-2 

-3-8 



-6-5 



9t 



81 



58 8 



— 3 



—4 
— 5 



47 



46 



46 



Precipitation, in inches. 






I-5I 
1. 12 
0.92 
1-53 
1.26 
1.29 
0.14 
1. 21 
1-35 
0.74 
1.29 
o-i5 
0.78 
1.07 
1-74 
o-95 
1.48 

1.15 
i-74 
2.06 
1-34 
1.60 

1-59 
1.80 

'•33 
0.94 
1.56 
1-57 
1.20 

1. 41 
1-31 
1. 41 
1. 81 
I-3I 

1. 15 
1.50 
2.02 
2.04 
1.03 
1-55 

1.06 
0.99 

1. 16 
0.66 
0.63 
'■35 



1-94 
1-63 
0.60 

'•59 

1. 00 

0-95 
1. 00 
i-5 2 
0.56 
1. 14 
1.26 

0-73 

0.40 
0.66 
0.30 
■■'5 



0.50 



°-95 
0.08 



o. 10 
1. 00 
1. 17 
0.62 
0.50 

0-15 
0-13 
0.30 
0.32 

o.45 
0.32 
0.62 
0.55 

0.25 
0.69 
0.85 
0.88 
0.15 



14 0.40 



a 

si 

SI 



-0-33 



+°- 35 
+0.20 
+ 0.44 
+ 0.10 



— o. 16 
+0.51 
+0.67 
+0.04 
+0.28 
—0.41 
+0-33 
+ o.]8 
+ 0.70 
+0.03 
+0.49 

+ 0.55 
+ 1.02 
+0.85 
+o- 75 
+0.42 
+ 0.94 
+0.94 
+0.24 
+0.33 
+0.34 
+0.75 
+0.36 
+0.68 
+"•53 
+ 0.77 
+0.67 
+ 0.51 
+0.50 
+0.65 
+0.91 
+ 1.18 



+0.86 

+0.44 
+0.54 
+ 0.68 
+ 0.25 
+ 0.28 
+ Q-59 



+ 1.38 
+0.74 
+0.19 
+o.57 
+ o.34 
+0.21 
+0.52 
+ 0.96 
+ 0.17 
+0.46 
+ 0.71 



+0.08 
+0.17 
+0. 11 
+o.57 



+0.26 
+o-33 
+Q-35 
—0-45 



— °-33 
+°- 25 
+0.51 
+ 0.28 
+0.09 



—0.35 
— 0.20 
+0.02 
+0.03 
— 0.21 
+0.22 
+0.06 

— o. 01 

+0.04 
+0.16 
+0.31 
— 0.17 



-0.04 



o. 10 

0.80 
0.83 

0.67 
1-13 
0.56 
1. 12 
0.09 
0.83 
0.68 
0.61 
0.81 
0-15 
0.42 
0.84 
1. 00 
0.78 
0-55 

0.80 
°-73 
0.83 
0.85 
0.62 
0.79 
1. 10 
0.74 
0.70 
0.65 
1. 00 
1. 00 

°-59 
0.72 
1.20 
0.68 
0.83 
0.70 
0.60 
0.85 
1. 00 
0.72 
0.50 

0.82 
o.44 
0.66 
0.14 
0.20 
0.90 



0.63 
1. 15 
0.20 
1. 00 
0.65 
0.40 
0.63 
0.65 

0-53 
0.70 
0.92 

0.62 
0.25 
0.62 
0.30 
0.77 



0.30 
0.85 

°-75 
0.05 



o. 10 

°-39 

0.50 
0.50 
0.30 

o. 10 
0.13 

0.20 

0.20 
O.25 

o. 14 

0.20 
0.20 

O.25 

O.3O 
O.3O 
O.3O 
O.06 



0.14 



C-T-, 



1.0 

2.2 
2.0 



4-5 
0.8 
1-5 
3-3 
3-5 
I.I 
'•5 
1-5 
3-8 
'•5 
4.0 

1-4 



7.0 
3-2 
6.5 
5-5 

4-5 



2.0 
10. o 

3-9 
2.0 
4.1 
3-' 



2.5 
2.9 
2.0 
2.0 
5-9 
6.5 
2.0 

5-5 

3-° 
5-5 
4-5 
4-5 
5-5 
4-5 



3-5 
3-4 
4.0 
4.2 
2.0 
5-5 
3-0 
6.2 



2.7 
1-9 

0-3 
1-5 
0-3 
3-o 
2.5 



5-o 
1.0 
2.0 



1.0 

4.8 



1-5 
1-3 
3-0 
3-2 
4.0 
4-4 

6.2 

5-5 

2-5 
5-9 

8.2 

8.0 
0.9 



.CO 

a 



Sky. 



•O £> 3 

a° 



3 

a 
is 



s*o 
« S 



nw. 
nw. 
nw. 
n. 



nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

s. 

nw. 

sw. 

nw. 

sw. 

n. 

n. 

nw. 

nw. 



nw. 

n. 

n. 

n. 

n. 

nw. 

w. 

n. 

nw. 

nw. 



n. 
nw. 



nw. 
nw. 



nw. 
nw. 



nw. 
nw. 
nw. 
nw. 



nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

n. 

w. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

n. 

nw. 

nw. 



nw. 
nw. 
sw. 



w. 
nw. 



nw. 
nw. 
nw. 



n. 
nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

sw. 

w. 

nw. 

w. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 
sw. 
nw. 
nw. 
nw. 



w. 



Observers. 



R.E.Bowden. 

E. A. Palmer. 

C.C.Gray. 

Dr. Geo. Roberts. 

Wm. J. Phillips. 

T. B.A.Watson. 

T.W.Lyman. 

C.C.Irwin. 

Dr. F.A.Long. 

Dr. P. H.Salter. 

G.S.Clingman. 

U. S. Weather Bureau. 

Chas. N.Cole. 

W.H.Hamlin. 

W.Gerecke. 

Dr. A. D. Nesbit. 

I. H. Weaver. 

C.J.Kadish. 

E.D.Smith. 

Dr.A.S. vMansfelde. 

G.D.Cairington. 

H.C.Miller. 

A. C. Zimmerman. 

Doane College. 

E.B.Taylor. 

Mrs. Ira Draper. 

L.L. Fuller. 

W.F.Cramb. 

F.M.Flory. 

Dr. J. T.Fleming. 

Dr. C.M.Easton. 

U. S. Weather Bureau. 

E.Morton. 

W.F.Gingrich. 

L.E.Ost. 

L.W.Hahn. 

C.M.Miller. 

Wm.N. Hunter. 

G. Treat. 

H.B.Ware. 

O.P.Lowry. 

F.A.Pettinger. 
Chas. R. Hare. 
F.Rein. 
H.L.Ormsby. 
Geo.B.Mair. 
J. A.McRae. 
L.L. Williams. 
R.W.Haller. 
Geo. S.Truman. 
A. V.Carlson. 
E.Corbin. 
C.E. Manner. 
IraP.Griswold. 
E.S.Hayhurst. 
J.E.Goodrich. 
Jas. Milford. 
Erastus Smith. 
Paul Anderson. 

R.E. Pitcher. 
J F.Edwards. 
C.G.George. 
W.F. Winger. 
C.S. Draper. 
Dr. S.R. Razee. 
F.T.Owen. 
T.P.F.Haine. 
J.C.Swarts. 
C.Engstrom. 
Robert Malcolm. 
C.T.Watson. 
John McKenzie. 
Joel Hull. 
A.Conover. 
W.Bardon. 
D.F. Hostetter. 

Robt. H.Willis. 
J.P.Finley. 
F.J. Bellows. 
A.B.Persinger. 
Grant E. Bolkcom. 
U. S. Weather Bureau. 
F.D.Gallup. 
D.McNall. 

J.Kridelbaugh. 
Post surgeon. 

C. A. Waterman. 

D. A.Piercy. 
Mrs.C.Arter. 
Ezada Phelps. 

U.S. Weather Bureau. 



* Temperature data from thermometers not self registering. t Occurred on more than one day. », b , ", etc., indicate number of days missing from observed readings. 
All records are used in determining State or district means, but State and district departures are determined by comparison of current dataof only stations with normals. 






CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



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CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



December, 1809. 















Daily precipitation for Nebraska, December, 


1899. 


























Stations. 


Day of month. 




i. 


2. 


3- 


4. 


5- 


6. 


7- 


8. 


9- 


10. 


it. 


12. 


■3- 


14. 


15- 


16. 


■7- 


18. 


'9- 


20. 


21. 


22. 


23- 


24. 


25- 


26. 


27- 


28. 


29. 


30. 


3». 


O 




.10 


t 

■5 








t 


".82 


t 






t 


t 
•09 








+ 














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* 
t 


t 

* 


* 


t 
* 
•25 


? 

.02 

. IO 
.10 


• 


t 

* 


• 


+ 

* 


0. 10 

1.06 
0.25 

0.73 
0.99 
























• 


* 






















































.62 


.08 
• 44 
.80 
•73 
•83 
■85 
•15 








t 




















I 5 


•05 
• 05 


.01 

t 


t 
t 
•05 

"t 

t 
•03 




t 


.01 
.12 


t 
t 
t 

.04 
t 








































•15 

t 
t 

•32 












• 14 
•33 

f 


•25 
•34 

.12 


.26 
•55 


.05 
.01 
•05 

t 
























t 

.04 
• 05 

t 


"+ 




t 
































1.74 

2.06 
1-34 
0.15 
1.60 
0.66 
































t 


•■5 






















t 




















.02 


t 

t 

.... 


• 03 

t 

.10 
t 












































t 










.62 

* 

+ 








•30 
.01 

t 
t 




•05 


















t 




.40 


.... 


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t 






t 










.62 

•3° 

.80 

• 77 


t 




































t 




























.20 




.10 

t 


• 03 










•25 
.18 


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"t 

• 07 




















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t 


•07 


t 

.20 
• 05 










■■5" 
'•'5 
0.66 










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.14 






















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• 05 


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.10 


t 
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•°5 




































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t 

t 


.... 

t 

.10 

t 


t 


t 










• 30 

t 






.20 

•05 






























.10 

•15 
.10 
.02 


•05 


•05 
.10 


.20 
.08 


.10 

■05 
t 


0-95 
0.63 
0.15 
1. 12 
0.92 
i-59 










t 




























.20 

t 
.01 














t 




























t 


•17 
•15 
t 


.02 










•83 




•05 
























.02 

t 


t 






t 










.67 
.06 






































•79 


•25 

t 


•25 


t 
























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.20 
.02 
t 


t 


t 


t 


.04 
.02 














•05 




















































* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 
.20 
.OI 


+ 
t 




t 




+ 


t 






•°5 

t 














1. 10 

•74 


•25 
.18 


.10 


.20 
t 


















t 










•09 






















.01 




.18 




t 




.02 


1-33 


















































•25 

4- 

.65 


•35 
.63 
. 11 


•55 

•50 


































.20 

•45 


•35 




.20 
•15 


.16 


■•55 
■•94 
■•56 
0.69 






+ 


t 












.20 




























•30 
■30 










































.IO 


•'5 












•05 


.02 


























• 05 


.02 
































































•13 

t 
•25 












•90 
1. 00 


•23 

■17 

■■■5 


•07 
.06 

t 




























t 
t 
•03 


.20 

t 














■•53 
■•57 
■ .63 
0.13 






t 










t 


.08 
.12 

t 










t 














.22 
•04 
•13 
.20 


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t 

.20 
.10 
•05 

t 

t 

X 
• 05 

.11 


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.02 
.02 


.02 


.02 

t 

.06 
•'5 




































t 
t 














t 
























t 
.09 

t 












.20 


t 
1. 00 
.80 

X 

•56 
.89 
•85 


























t 

.10 


t 
. 10 


.08 














"+' 

•30 
•05 

.11 

.12 


• 14 
t 


.10 
. IO 

t 
t 
























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■•59 
1.28 




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t 










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.20 
t 






















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+ 


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t 
t 


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•25 

X 










1.26 
































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X 


X 
i 


.20 
t 






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t 




























•25 


t 
t 
















•30 
•51 


t 
t 


t 


















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t 
t 




• 30 

t 








t 
t 


0.85 
t.4I 

0.95 
0.08 
















•59 






















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.20 
•03 


t 


t 


t 












































t 














t 
•15 


t 






t 




























•05 


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t 
.10 


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.30 
















.65 
























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•25 




























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88 


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.06 

t 
•03 

t 
.11 

t 

.14 
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t 
.20 

.01 








0.30 
0.15 
0-95 
■•3' 
0.32 






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. 10 

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.10 

t 

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.01 


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.10 

t 

t 
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t 

t 
















.40 

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.20 

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.22 


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t 


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t 
t 
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•05 


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■•35 
1. 21 




























































































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"t 

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t 








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•39 

t 

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.68 

t 

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.61 
• 70 
.81 

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•30 

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■75 




















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t 

t 


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•14 

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t 
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■•05 
0.45 
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1.52 


North Platte 












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.02 


t 

.02 




























0.32 
0.74 






•05 










X 






















t 


.02 


.01 


Odell .. 
































■•45 
1.29 

0.15 
1.34 






.06 
t 
.20 


t 
t 










.16 

t 
t 


t 


t 


t 


















t 


t 


.05 


t 








t 


O'Neill 


+ 


• 15 










t 
























































.02 
•05 


t 
.10 




. 10 


















•05 


t 


























t 
.20 


0. 10 








t 




































t 


.10 


t 


1. 00 


















































.06 


t 










.24 


•49 
.20 


t 
• 50 


t 

•35 


.08 




























.12 


•05 
.IO 


.01 


• 05 


.04 
.02 


t 
"t" 


'•■4 














t 
.60 


























1. 17 


Rulo 


•15 


.06 

+ 


.02 
•03 


t 








.68 
.92 


t 




















t 


.... 


I 5 


1 81 










• 0.5 
•42 

1. 00 






.06 




















. IO 




• 03 


.02 


1.26 


































•15 


.18 


0.78 
















•35 
.02 
.02 


t 
"t 


























•05 
.20 


. 10 
.20 
.20 










I.50 




















.10 

t 
•40 
















t 












t 


t 


.10 


'.-OS 

.10 


0.62 








.02 










.83 


.'7 






















.02 




■•3' 






.01 




































.10 


.10 


.10 


0.81 




























































.08 


t 












.84 
•70 
.60 
•15 






























{ 


• 15 














1.07 














•25 
.20 
•04 






























.20 
.20 


t 








1 .15 




















•50 






































1.50 






•15 


.20 










1. 00 


























t 


.20 
• 03 












■■74 
















.20 

• 25 

.11 
























•15 
.04 


.10 
•14 
•04 


•'5 
.01 


.01 


.05 
... 
.02 


."02 
.02 
•05 


0.70 






• 04 
.14 


.04 
.01 










•32 


•53 


.18 


.36 
























■ II 


2.02 














t 






















0.40 














•50 


.62 
•78 
1. 00 
•5° 




•05 






















•OS 
.02 




1.27 


Wakefield .. 




•03 
.06 


.... 
t 

t 

t 

.10 
.12 

t 
































t 


.12 
. IO 
.12 




t 








0.95 
















•03 


• 44 


.21 

•05 

•■5 


f 




















• 03 






.02 


2.04 




.26 










.55 






















1.48 














+ 
























.10 


.20 










0-55 


















■75 
•50 




























.12 










0.99 


York 




t 










• So 






•'5 
























t 


t 




.40 


t 




i 


■•55 







































* Record missing. 



t Trace (when precipitation is less than o.oi of an inch). 



t Precipitation included in that of following day. 



*v. 






i 4° 

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. 



ANNUAL SUMMARY, 1899. 



NEBRASKA SECTION 



OF THE 



CLIMATE AND CROP SERVICE 



OF THE 



WEATHER BUREAU. 



PUBLISHED BY AUTHORITY OF THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE. 



UNDER DIRECTION OF 

WILLIS L. MOORE 

CHIEF OP WEATHER BUREAU 



BY 



G. fl. LOVELiflND, 

SECTION DIRECTOR, 

Office, University of Nebraska, Lincoln. 




Natura 






x 



32 

— i 



> 



72 

= 
O 

32 



z 

K 




I 



( 



Year 1899. 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, 

Climate and Crop Service 

OF THE 

WEATHER BUREAU. 

CENTRAL OFFICE: WASHINGTON, D. C. 



NEBRASKA SECTION, 

G. A. LOVELAHD, Section Director, 

LINCOLN, NEBR. 



Vol. IV. 



LINCOLN, NEBR. 



No. 13. 



SUMMARY OF CROP CONDITIONS FOR 1899. 

The fall of 1898 was very unfavorable for fall-sown grain. 
Low temperature in October retarded growth, and after 
November 1 growth practically ceased. Continued low 
temperature until the second week in April caused all grain 
to start late in the spring. 

The precipitation for the last three months of 1898 was 
1.14 inches below the normal, and for the first three months 
of 1899, 0.70 of an inch below the normal. This shows a 
deficiency in precipitation of 1.84 inches for the six months 
preceding April 1, 1899. Fall-sown grain entered the winter 
in poor condition and was injured by the severe winter, but 
with favorable conditions in April would have recovered 
somewhat. April, however, was unusually dry, with but 
little rain until the last days of the month, and grain suf- 
fered seriously. 

The precipitation and temperature of the next two months 
were about normal, and the precipitation was well distrib- 
uted. All crops made excellent progress. 

July is the critical month for corn. The first half of the 
month was very favorable, but ten days of dry weather — 
from the 17th to the 26th — retarded growth and somewhat 
injured the crop. The deficiency in precipitation for July 
was 0.53 of an inch. In the first half of August, showers 
were general and heavy, but in the last half and in Septem- 
ber the lack of rain considerably lowered the yield of corn. 

The average and normal temperature and rainfall for the 
five months of the crop season, by sections, are as follows : 



Sections. 



Southeastern 
Northeastern 

Central 

Southwestern 

Western 

Northwestern 

State 



Temperature. 



Mean. Aver 



65.2 
65.8 
67.6 
62.6 
62.4 

65.2 



67.4 
65.7 
65.6 
67.2 
63.7 
62.8 

65-4 



Rainfall. 



Mean. Average. 



19-53 
18.18 
15-85 
12.30 
10. 16 
11.94 
14.66 



19-54 
18.46 
16.36 
16.90 
12.30 
12.82 

16.40 



CLIMATOLOGY OF THE YEAR 1899. 
ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE. 

The average atmospheric pressure for the State .was 30.01 
inches, which is 0.05 of an inch below the normal. The 
highest barometer was 31.12 inches, at North Platte on 
February 11, and the lowest was 29.31 inches, at Omaha on 
April 30. The yearly range for the State was 1.81 inches. 



TEMPERATURE. 

The mean annual temperature for the State was 47.8°, 
which is 0.4° below the normal. The mean temperature for 
February, the coldest month, was 12.1°, and for August, the 
warmest month, 73.8°. The lowest temperature was 47° 
below zero, at Camp Clarke on February 12, and the high- 
est was 108°, at Beaver City on June 18 and September 4, 
Pleasanthill on September 5, and Camp Clarke on August 
28. The average local annual range of temperature, as com- 
puted from the records of 84 stations, for the sections and 
State was as follows: Southeastern, 131°; northeastern, 
132°; central, 137°; southwestern, 139°; western, 139°; 
northwestern, 139° ; State, 136°. The greatest annual range 
was 155°, at Camp Clarke, and the least was 124°, at Salem. 
The greatest daily local range of temperature was 66°, at 
Kennedy on September 21. 

PRECIPITATION (RAIN AND MELTED SNOW). 

The average total precipitation over the State for the year 
was 19.51 inches, which is 3.68 inches below the normal. 
The greatest total precipitation was 87.98 inches, at Fre- 
mont, and the least was 6.65 inches, at Merriman. The 
greatest monthly average for the State was 3.83 inches, in 
June, and the least was 0.24 of an inch, in January. The 
greatest local monthly precipitation was 11.76 inches, at 
Tekamah in June, and the least was none, at several western 
stations in January, September, October, and November. 
The greatest amount recorded as falling in twenty-four cou- 
secutive hours was 5.53 inches, at Fremont on August 7. 

SNOW (UNMELTED). 

The following chart shows the distribution of snowfall (in 
inches) over the State for the winter season of 1898-'99: 



HO 30 




20 30 30 
Scale of shades (in inches): 



□ 






Under 20. 20 to 30. 30 to 40. 40 to 50. Over 50. 
WIND. 

The prevailing direction of the wind was from the north- 
west. The average velocity over the State was 9.0 miles an 
hour, which is 0.5 of a mile an hour above the normal. 

Wind and humidity table. 





Wind. 


Humidity. 


Stations. 


Miles. 


Mean. 


Max. 


Dir. 


Date. 


Mean. 


Low- 
est. 


Date. 




96,192 
79, 569 
74,626 


11. 

9-i 
8-5 


48* 

48 

42 


n. 

se. 

ne. 


Jan. 28 
June 1 
Aug. 1 


70 
66 
73 


12 
15 
25 


April 28 
June 17 
Oct. 5 


North Platte 





* Also from the northeast on August 12. 



1 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



Year 1899. 



COMPARISON OF PAST YEARS. 

The monthly maximum and minimum temperatures for several sta- 
tions have been obtained for the years 1870 to 1888, and the following 
table has been revised, and differs slightly from the comparative tables 
previously published : 



Years. 



1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 

!8Si 
18S2 
188} 
1884 
188s 
1 886 
1887 
18.88 



Temperature. 


Pre- j 

cipita- j 








Mean. 


Max. 


Min. 


tion. ! 

I 


47-6 


><>3 


—25 


22.64 


48.5 


107 


—16 


25-34 


49-4 


103 


— 16 


25-^7 


48.6 


100 


-27 


24.39 i 


47-4 


i°5 


—26 


21.23 i 


48.0 


104 


—35 


3"-9' 


49-2 


106 


—2! 


23-5r 


45-7 


109 


—34 


3°. 74 


46.5 


10! 


—39 


24.00 


47-4 


IOO 


—27 


25.98 


47-6 


110 


—33 


23-71 


47-5 


106 


—32 


22.99 


47-3 


IO5 


-3° 


22.86 


49-3 


II! 


—27 


22.64 



Years. 


Temperature. 


Mean. 


Max. 


Min. 


1891 

1892 

'893 

1894 

1895 

1896 

1897 

1898 

1899 

Average for 
the past 24 


49-3 
47-7 
47-7 
47-6 
50.0 
48.6 
49-4 
49.1 
48.5 
47-8 

48.2 


112 
no 

113 

no 

114 

no 

109 
113 
109 
108 

107 


—34 
-38 
—42 
—28 
-38 
—34 
— 22 
—26 
— 22 
-47 

—3° 



Pre- 
cipita- 



17.18 
30.62 
24. 12 
16.80 
'3-30 
18.70 
26. 19 
23-5° 
20.70 

19-5' 



23- '9 



Means for the six equal sections of the State 





Temperature. 


Precipitation. 


Number of days- 


Sections. 


Mean. 


Aver- 
age.* 


Mean. 


Aver- 
age, t 


Snow. 


Rainy. 


Clear. 


Partly 
cloudy. 


Cloudy. 


Southeast . . 
Northeast.. 

Central 

Southwest . 

West 

Northwest . 

State 


50.6 
47-3 
48.2 
50.1 
46.1 
45-0 
47-8 


«>. i 

47.8 
47-9 
49-9 
47-9 
46.4 


27-39 
23-70 
20. 19 
16.76 
13-42 
16.25 

19- 51 


29.20 
27.24 
23-79 
23.79 

•7-35 
18.36 


23-9 
15-6 
17.0 
15.8 
22.9 
3°-4 
20.9 


63-3 
70.6 
53-8 
45- S 
5'-7 
55-7 
56.6 


158.4 

154.3 
181.0 

'69-5 
183.2 
181. 5 

171. 2 


123.6 
135-6 
■04-3 
129-3 
112. 9 
112. 

II9-5 


82.6 
75-3 
79-5 
66.1 
69. 1 
72.3 
73.9 



* For ten years. t For twenty years. 

Supplemental precipitation table. 



Stations. 



Bartley 

Bassett 

Bellevue 

Benedict 

Bradshaw 

Burchard 

Burwell 

Chester 

Clatonia 

Cody 

Culbertson 

Eden 

Elba 

Ewing 

Fairfield 

Fairmont 

Gordon 

Greeley 

Hayes Center .. 

Hubbard 

Johnstown 

Lyons 

McCool Junct'n 

Marquette 

Merriman 

Monroe 

Nemaha 

Odell 

Osceola 

Ough 

Palmer 

Palmyra 

Paxton 

Plattsmouth . . . 

Pleasanthill 

St.Libory 

Salem 

Sargent 

Schuvler 

Smithfield 

Spragg 

Stockham 

Strang 

Stratton 

Syracuse 

Tablerock 

Thedford 

Univers'y Farm 

Valparaiso 

Wallace 

Wauneta 

Wellfleet 

Wilber 

Willard 

Wisner 



o. 10 

o. 19 
0.05 
0.07 
0.05 



t 
0.05 



0.50 
0.50 
0.20 

t 
0.28 

t 

t 
0.20 

t 
0.50 



t 

0. 12 
0.03 
0.20 
0.80 
0.07 
o. to 
0.00 

t 

0.60 

t 

0.09 
0.30 



0.22 



o. 10 
0.50 

t 
0.49 

0-35 
0.17 

O. IS 



0.70 
0.76 
0.60 
0-35 
+ 
0.03 
0.07 



0.07 
0.40 

0.43 
1. 10 

1-05 

I.I 

0.60 

1. 17 

1. 10 

0.20 

1.07 

0.85 

0.60 

o-55 

1.47 

0.60 



0.20 



0.65 
0.69 
°-75 
o-35 
0.30 



0.70 
0.80 
0.96 
.060 
0.75 
o-57 
0.60 

0.45 
0.85 
0.60 
0.85 



0.45 



0.80 
0.90 
1.40 
0.36 
0.50 
0.90 
0.28 
0.65 
o-53 
0.80 

0-95 
0.92 
0.65 
0.07 
0.62 



o.45 
3-40 
0.44 
0.56 
°-'5 
1. 00 
0.05 
0.41 
0.91 
0.19 
0.94 
1.85 

O.4O 

1.38 
0.32 
0.36 
1.40 
0-35 
1-33 
0.50 



'•25 

0.44 
0.27 
0.80 
0.70 

'•53 
0.96 
0.50 
0.70 



0.80 
1.66 
0.90 
2.03 
0.72 
2-15 



0.30 



0.61 
0.50 
0.90 
0.90 
0.97 
2. 19 

0-35 
0.52 
0-77 
0.91 
1.90 
1.75 
0.85 





>> 


c 


<s 


< 


S 


0.46 


1.79 


1.42 


5-54 


2.17 


5-54 


1.48 


3-54 


1-25 


5-'9 


1.20 


3-94 


O.42 


2-97 


0.S8 


4-9' 




3.36 


t 




0.4S 


'•93 


1.63 


6.63 


0-55 


4-3° 


I.SK 


3-°5 


1-75 


3-"o 


1.58 
0.70 


3- =9 
5.25 



3-36 1 -9i 
3-57 3- 6 7 
7-42 3-°4 
3 " 



1. 10 3.40 
o.34 3.24 
1.43! 5- '5 
o. ioi 4.7s 
1. 10 5.94 
1.64 2.48 
0.65I 4.37 
t 3-°° 
I. ill 4.18 
3.09J 6.71 
5-40 



0.22 

0.27 

0.40 

2.72 

0.40 

3-°4 

1.69 

°-43, 

1.20 5.25 

0.42 1.83 

0-62 5.95 



4-54 
1.44 
3-99 
5.20 
2-57 
5-13 
3-4' 



i 



0-73] 



0.81 3.42 

1. 00 

2.00 3.18 
0.421 1. 61 
2.00! 4.94 

I-47J 5-47 
0.20 2.95 
1.51I 2.32 
2.45J 4- '6 
o. 101 4.65 

1.62 

°-75 5-33 
'■75 3-4o 
0-39 4-63 
1.63 4. :8 



6.70 
8.47 
4.18 
3-93 
9.62 

6-39 
1.65 
3.61 
3-46 
4-3' 
4-53 
4-5° 
6. 10 
1.80 
3-95 
'•52 
4. 10 
1.90 
6. 14 



3-28 
4.69 
1.27 
6.13 
3-77 
0.04 
3-95 
7.68 
2.87 
1.08 
2.45 
3-33 
1.50 
2.85 
3-36 
1.29 
0.25 
2-37 



5-73 
1.69 
4-45 
4.83 
3-29 
5.26 
7-53 
5-3° 



3-86 
6.06 



'•55 



5 

4-5° 

3-59 



5- '8 3-°3 

4.08 2.99 

1 . 00 o. 55 

3-55 '-oij 

2.68 5.48 1 

5-8o 4-70 



6-35, 
2.5° 
2. 79! 
1.32 
2.81 
1.98 
3-8o 
2-35 



2.00 10.85 



3-59 
2.50 



3-77 '-98 



5-" 
3.02 
2.87 
5-43 
2-57 
8.24 
9- "3 
2.63 
2.80 

5-99 
1. 71 

5-0.5 



3-26 
2.80 
4-65 
1.09 

3-24 

5-97 

5.36 

3-78 

0.8s 

2.88 

2.40 

3-25 

2.18 

4 

7 

2.90 

2.24 

2.56 
o. 10 
4.8. 
5.80 
4.84 
3-57 
2.08 

3-29 

4-72 
1.87 
3-35 
4.3 6 
3-21 
5-55 
3-7i 
8.19 
1. 91 
5-78 



0.46 



0-51 
1.27 
1. 18 
0.82 
o.54 
0.42 
'■43 



0.03 
0.87 
0.61 
0.00 
0.50 

°-"5 
0.30 

l.°5 
0.12 



2.45 
2.64 
1. 81 
6.06 
3-32 
'•9t 
2.61 
2-95 
3-" 

4. "I 

3.89: 6.61 
1.8SJ 1.24 
2-751 2.59 



'•95 
2.04 
4.28 
5-4' 
3-03 
2.34 
3-64 
0.60 
'•35 



t 
0.72 



1. 16 
0.00 
0.50 
0.64 
'•52 
1. 10 
0.00 
0-52 
0.69 
0.25 
0.46 
0-'5 
0.52 
0.80 
0.32 
0.90 
0.71 
0.20 



t 

0.20 
0.62 
1.24 
0.18 
0.62 
0.30 
0.20 
0.00 
0.80 

o-39 
0.57 

0-53 



3-23 
o-93 
1. 81 
3-12 
0.00 
3-65 
3- 80 



0.23 

4-9° 
0.20 

0-57 
'•30 
3 

0.80 
1. 00 
t 



t 
0.89 
1. 81 



0.00 
0.62 
4-35 
3-95 
0.42 
0.00 
o. 12 
3-39 



3-99 

3-20 

0.40 

2-55 
0.20 

'•75 
0.00 
*i.25 



3-63 
0.07 
4.12 
3-57 
o. 11 
2.5' 
1.64 

°-'5 
0.00 
0.80 
3-" 

0.37 
1.47 



2.75 



'•59 
1.36 
1-4" 
o.so 
0.66 
o-54 
1. 00 



'.65 
1. 00 
0.60 
0.47 
0.90 

I- '5 
0.20 

°-35 
2. 10 



o. 10 
0.96 
1. 00 
0.84 
0.00 
0.69 
0.81 



0.72 

2- '5 
0.50 

0.81 



'•'5 
1.06 
0.51 
°-5> 
1.07 
0.71 
1. 81 
'•35 



0.67 
2-54 
0.70 
0.81 
0.50 
0.61 
0.63 
0.00 
2.40 



1. 10 
'•95 



'.63 
'•5° 
1.80 



3'-53 
26.95 
29.30 



0.95 14.65 

1.36 31.64 

2.25 

0.50 

0. 11 

1.87 



0.58 



1. 16 



o. n 
2.00 
0-25 
1-35 
1-3' 
1.26 
o. 10 
1.26 
1.05 
'•45 
'■34 
0. 10 
1. 00 
'•5° 



'7-7' 
36.91 
21.72 
'7-85 



23.62 



19.04 
16. c8 



24-43 



6.65 
32.94 



1. 31 

'•57 
1.67 

1.45 
0.86 
'■5° 
0.62 
0.81 



1.60 
0.14 
1.40 
1.72 
0.70 
1.29 
1.27 
0.2c 



1.54 
0.17 
0.99 



25-45 
12.13 



26.64 



29.87 
'8.31 
33.36 



23. 98 



20.8S 



22.89 
'4-43 
24-56 
34-44 
'4-34 



27-73 
'3-95 



29.28 



* Eight days missing from record. 



t Trace of precipitation. 



Monthly means for 1899. 



Months. 



January . . 
February.. 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 
September 
October . . . 
November 
December , 



Mean 
barome- 
ter. 



30.12 
30.20 
30.08 
29.98 
29.89 
29.90 
29.92 
29.85 
3 fl -°3 
3°-°' 
30.08 
30.02 



Temperature. 


Mean. 


Aver- 




age.* 


23.0 


19.9 


12. 1 


24-3 


26.8 


33-8 


49.0 


49-3 


59-6 


59-3 


70.0 


69.6 


73-4 


74-7 


73-8 


72.8 


64.4 


63.6 


53-° 


5°-' 


43-4 


34-7 


25-5 


25.8 



Average 

wind 
velocity. 



Precipitation. 



Mean. 



0.24 
0.61 
0.92 
0.99 
3-7' 
3-83 
2.87 
3.26 
0.46 
1. 00 
0.88 
0.84 



Aver- 
age.* 



0.65 
0.67 
'•'5 
2.49 
3.61 
3-9° 
3-4° 
2.59 
1.80 
'•54 
0.70 
0.69 



Snow. 



2.4 
6.2 

8.1 
o-7 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
0.2 
3-3 



' For past twenty-four years. 



VOLUNTARY OBSERVERS 



Stations. 


Observers. 


Stations. 


Observers. 




R. E.Bowden. 

F.A.Petlinger. 

J.Kridelbaugh. 

R.E. Pitcher. 

C'has.R.Hare. 

J. F.Edwards. 

E.D.Smith. 

Dr. A. S. v Mansfelde. 

O.C.Steele. 

F. Rein. 

G.D.Carrington. 
H.C.Miller. 
R.S.Baker. 
A.C.Zimmerman. 
C.G. George. 
E.F.Stouffer. 
R.B. Brabham. 
W.F. Winger. 
Dr. E. A. Palmer. 
C.S. Draper. 
E.O.Roggy. 
H.L.Ormsby. 

W.S.Green. 

Geo.B.Mair. 

Robt. H.Willis. 

J.A.McRae. 

W.J.Kissick. 

F.W.Jones. 

W.E.Pontius. 

C.C.Gray. 

Dr. Geo. Roberts. 

Doane College. 

Mrs.L.A.Wibley. 

Dr. S.R. Razee. 

E.B.Taylor. 

Mrs. Ira Draper. 

L.L.Williams. 

D.J.Wood. 

L.L. Fuller. 

S.M.Wellman. 

A.Dahl. 

G. H.Benson. 
W.F.Cramb. 
M.L.Jones. 
G.H. Borden. 
Post Surgeon. 
F.T.Owen. 
Wm. J. Phillips. 
F. M.Flory. 
Geo.S. Truman. 
J.P.Finley. 
A.Burwell. 
A.V.Carlson. 
E.Corbin. 
Thomas Connor. 
Amer. Beet Sugar Co. 

T.P.F. Haine. 

T. B.A.Watson. 

Dr. J. T.Fleming. 

J.C.Swarts. 

R.C.Orr. 

C. A. Waterman. 

Dr.C.M.Easton. 

(J.O.Franklin. 

T.W.Lyman. 

C.Engstrom. 

M.M.Beacom. 

R.Malcolm. 

G.M.Heiney. 

C.E. Magner. 

D.A.Piercv. 

F. J. Bellows. 

Mrs.C. A.Arter. 

Ira P.Griswold. 

U.S. Weather Bureau. 

H.F.Bethune. 

1 


Lodgepole 


A.B.Persinger. 
E.S. Hayhurst. 
C.C. Irwin. 
N.R.Kellam 




Alliance 


Lynch 




McCook 

McCool Junction . 


C T Watson 


Arapahoe 


F.E.Porter. 
Dr. F.A.Long. 






Do 


Marquette 


John Ellis 




F. Hussong. 
Joel Hull 








Do 


Dr.H. Hapeman. 


Bartley 




Beatrice 


Nebraska Citv 

Do '. 


R.1J. Douglas. 






R J Duff 






G.E Bolkcom 


Blair 

Bluehill 


Norfolk 


Dr P H Salter 


North Loup 

North Platte 


J.E.Goodrich. 




G.S.Clingmau. 
I B Huffman 




Odell 








O'Neill 


Chas N Cole 




Ord 


Jas Millord 


Central City 




G. W.Murbarger. 
Wm.Ough. 
Dr. L.M. Brady. 
E II Smith 


Ough 


Oxford 










W.D Bancroft 










Plattsmouth 


W.L.Pickett 




J. W. Ingles. 






Do 


C. F. Bukey. 


David City 


Red Cloud 

Do 




W.S Burdick 




Rulo 


W.Bardon 




W. F.Gingrich. 


Ed<*ar 




Elba 

Plricson 


St. Paul 


Paul Anderson. 
W.W McDermet 




W.H.Hamlin. 




Sargent 


J.S.Spooner. 






F.D.Gallup. 

L.E.Ost. 

U.S. Weather Bureau. 


Franklin.' 


Seward 

Sioux City, Iowa. 




S.W. Spragg. 
Ezada Phelps. 












S.Diller. 


Grand Island 

Do 


Stratton 


C.W.Shurtliff. 
L W Hahn 




D.W.Van Home. 


Do 


Do 


S.H.Dopp. 
L.E.Pratt. 
CM. Miller. 


Hairier 




Dr A D Nesbit 


Thedford 




Hastings 

Hayes Center 


University Farm . 

Valparaiso 

Wakefield 


W.N. Hunter. 

S.W.Perin. 

U.S. Weather Bureau. 

W.J.Craven. 








H S Toogood 


Holdrege 

Hubbard 


Wauneta 

Weepingwater . .. 
Welllleet 


J.W.Hann. 
G. Treat. 


Kearney — ." 




C.J.Kadish. 
D McNall. 


Wilber 

Willard 

Wilsonville 

Wisner 

Wyiuore 

Yankton, S.Dak.. 


S.E.Davis. 


Kimball 


Wesley W.Lewis. 
D.F.Hostetter. 






G.W.Howe. 




H.B.Ware. 


Do 


U.S. Weather Bureau. 




O.P.Lowry. 







i :•• 






Year 1899. 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



Climatologrical data for the year 1899. 



Stations. 



Counties. 



Temperature (degrees Fahrenheit). 





Precipitation, in 


inches. 




c8 




Sky. 


•a 


3 


>> 










ca 


(-. 




V 


Si 










•O 




fc ™ 


to 

B 


si 

o 

"3 
o 


S. 

o 
S 

00 
» 

V 


a 




>> 

a 

o 

a 

OD 

C3 


43 

a 
o 


"3 

— 

o 
a 

O 


tx 

B 

"3 

u 

o 

a 

3 


o 

03 

a 
p 


a » 

a.2 

3° 


►J 


H 


O 


B 


iJ 


S 


H 


(5 


« 


& 



K-3 



■o S 
9* 



Northeastern Sec. 

Agee * 

Blair 

Columbus 

Creighton 

Fremont 

Hartington 

Hooper* 

Lynch 

Madison 

Norfolk 

Oakdale 

Omaha 

O'Neill 

Santee 

Stanton* 

Tekamah 

Wakefield 

Westpoint 

Southeastern Sec 

Arborville* 

Ashland 

Auburn 

Aurora * 

Beatrice 

Crete , 

David City 

Dawson 

Fairbury 

Fairmont 

Geneva 

Harvard 

Hebron 

Lincoln 

Nebraska City 

Nemaha* 

Pleasanthill* 

Salem* 

Seward * 

Strang* 

Superior* 

Tablerock* 

Tecumseh 

Turlington 

\V eepingwater * 

Wilber* 

Wymore* 

York * . 

Central Sec. 

Ansley 

Ashton* 

Brokenbow * 

Callaway 

Central City* 

Ericson* 

Genoa 

Gothenburg 

Grand Island 

Kearney* 

Lexington 

Loup* 

North Loup 

Ord* 

Kavenna 

St.Libory* 

St. Paul * 

Southwestern Sec 

Alma 

Beaver City 

Benkleman* 

Bluehill* 

Haigler* 

Hastings * , 

Imperial 

McCook* 

Madrid* , 

Minden 

Redcloud* 

Republican * 

VVilsonville* 

Western Sec 

Camp Clarke 

Kimball 

Lodgepole 

Nesbit 

North Platte , 

Whitman* 

Northwestern Sec 

Alliance* 

Fort Robinson 

Hay Springs . 

Kennedy 

Kirkwood * 

Spragg 

Valentine 



Holt 

Washington 

Platte 

Knox 

Dodge 

Cedar 

Dodge 

Boyd 

Madison 

...do 

Antelope 

Douglas 

Holt. 

Knox 

Stanton 

Burt 

Dixon 

Cuming 



York 

Saunders. .. 

Nemaha 

Hamilton .. 

Gage 

Saline 

Butler 

Richardson 
Jefferson. .. 
Fillmore . . . 

...do 

Clay 

Thayer 

Lancaster.., 

Otoe 

Nemaha 

Saline 

Richardson 

Seward 

Fillmore . . . 
Nuckolls — 
Pawnee .... 

Johnson 

Otoe 

Cass 

Saline 

Gage 

York 



Custer . . . 
Sherman . 
Custer — 

...do 

Merrick .. 
Wheeler . 
Platte 
Dawson . . 

Hall 

Buffalo... 
Dawson . . 
Sherman . 
Valley ... 

...do 

Buffalo... 
Howard . . 
...do 



Harlan 

Furnas 

Dundy 

Webster .... 

Dundy 

Adams 

Chase 

Red Willow. 

Perkins 

Kearney — 
Webster — 

Harlan 

Furnas 



Cheyenne . 
Kimball . . . 
Cheyenne . 

Logan 

Lincoln . . . 
Grant 



Box Butte 
Dawes — 
Sheridan . . 
Cherry — 

Rock 

...do 

Cherry — 



1,442 
i,6oo 
1,203 
1.309 



1,585 
1,532 



1,103 
1,975 



1,472 
1,060 
1,387 
',313 



1, 100 
',°5' 
1,792 
1,235 
1,368 
1,619 

945 
1,316 
1,641 
1,633 
1,812 
1,458 
1,199 

941 



909 

1,435 
1,627 

1,574 
1,023 

I,H3 
1,214 
1,080 
1,325 
1,222 
1,642 

2,3<>7 
2,061 

2,477 
2,555 
1,708 
2,029 
1,584 
2,557 
1,860 
2,146 

2,385 
2,067 
1,961 



2,028 



1,796 

1,939 

2,147 
2,968 
1,967 
3,256 
1,932 
3.278 
2,506 
3, 294 
2,169 
1,687 
1,939 
2,298 

3,800 
4,697 
3,820 



2,841 
3,588 

3,9*8 

3,764 
3,821 



2,613 



46.4 
47-8 
48.2 



45- o 
48.0 
47.1 
47-1 
46.4 

46.3 
50.2 
45-6 
47.8 
46.7 
48.5 
46.7 
49-5 

48.8 
50.2 
5<-4 
49.6 
50.2 
50.2 
49.2 

52.9 

50.8 
49-5 
49.6 
49-1 
50.6 
50.2 
50.6 
5°-9 
5°-5 



49.8 
5i-2 
53-0 
52.0 
51-0 
5°-i 
46.4 
50.2 

50.3 
49-3 

47-2 

48.7 
45-8 
46.9 



5 
. 5 
49.6 
50.6 



10 48.0 
47.0 



, 46.8 
10 48.2 



49.8 
49-7 



2 50.9 

51-8 
5 
5 50.8 



49.0 
9 49-6 
5 50-6 
7 
16 49. 



49-8 
5"-4 

46.9 

45-8 
46.1 
46.1 
47-8 



44-3 
44-4 
44.0 
45-6 
44-5 



98 
102 

99 
101 
1 02 J 

99 
103 
104 

98 

99 
102 
100 

106 
102 
100 

i°4i 

100 
100 
101 
102 
104 
io 3 t 
100 
100 
103 
1 01 
100 
105 
108 
98 
102 
100J 

I02J 
102 
I02 
IOO 

97* 
104 

98* 

ioij 

l°5 

106 % 

102 

IO4 

94 
104 
104 
103$ 
104 
100 

105 

104 



I02» 
104 
104 
IOO 

I04 
108; 
106 
[05 



I OI 
107$ 
106 
I06 

i°5 



I02i 
I03 

I08 

98} 
102} 

•°5 
101 



965 
102 
101 
i°5 
105 



June 18 
Sept. 6t 
Sept. 6 
June 18 
Sept. 6 
Sept. 7 
Sept. 6 
June 18 
Sept. 6 
Sept. 7 
Sept. 6 
Sept. 5 
June 18 
Aug. 29 
June 19 
Sept. 5+ 
Sept. 6 

Sept. 5 

"ido.".' 

...do.. 

...do.. 

...do.. 

...do.. 
Aug. 11 
Aug. 10 
Sept. 6 
Aug. 3 
Sept. 5 

"ido!"! 

...do.... 
Aug. 1 
Sept. 5 
Aug. 1 
Sept. 6 

Aug. 22 
Sept. 6 
...do.... 
Sept. 5 

Aug. 10 
Sept. 5 

June 18 
...do.... 
...do.... 
...do.... 
July 10 
Aug. 9 
Sept. 5 
June 18 
Sept. 5 
Sept. 5t 
June 18 
Sept. 6 



Sept. 5 
June 18 
Sept. 5 
June 18 

Sept. 6 
Sept. 4 
June 11 
Aug. 22 



Sept. 6 
Aug. 29 
June 19 
July 25 
June 18 



Sept. 6 
June 18 

Aug. 28 
Aug. 27 
June 18 
July 25 
...do — 



July 22t 
July 22 
Aug. 27 
July 25 
Tune 1 8 



July 25 



—40 

—37 

—47 
— ^o 
-36 
—34 
—35 
-36 

—40 

—37 
—41 
—35 

—33 



Feb. 11 
Feb. nt 
Feb. 11 
Feb. 9 
Feb. 11 
..do... 
..do... 
..do... 
..do... 
..do... 
Feb. 9 
Feb. 11 
Feb. 10 
Feb. 11 

...do.... 

...do.... 

...do.... 
Feb. 9 

Feb. 11 

...do.... 
Feb. 12 

...do.... 
Feb. 11 
Feb. 12 
Feb. 11 
Feb. 12 
Feb. 11 
Feb. 12 

...do.... 

...do.... 

...do.... 
Feb. 11 

...do.... 
Feb. 12 
Feb. nt 
Feb. 12 
Feb. 11 
Feb. 12 

...do.... 

...do.... 

...do.... 
Feb. nt 
Feb. 11 

...do... 
Feb. 12 
Feb. nt 

Feb. 11 

...do.... 

...do.... 

...do.... 

...do.... 
Feb. 12 
Feb. 11 

...do.... 
Feb. 12 

...do.... 
Feb. 11 
Feb. 12 

...do.... 

...do.... 

...do.... 

...do.... 

...do.... 

...do.... 
...do.... 
...do.... 
...do.... 
...do.... 
...do.... 
...do.... 
...do.... 
...do.... 
...do.... 



Feb. 12 
...do.... 

...do.... 
Feb. i! 
Feb. 3 
Feb. 1 it 
Feb. 12 
Feb. 11 

Feb. nt 
Feb. 10 
Feb. 11 

...do.... 

...do.... 



Feb. 11 



23.48 
31-65 
24.61 
20.38 
37-98 
27-95 
29.03 
24-73 
23.46 
23.81 
20.81 
26.74 
20 -35 
20.86 
25.68 
30.06 
19-57 
25-64 

24.01 

30.87 
34-02 



27- 75 
3°-33 



32-76 
26.29 
23.62 
23-42 
22.56 
28.42 
22. 53 
30-72 
32-9) 
29.87 
33-36 
28.99 
22.89 
25.78 
34-44 
29.28 
29.66 
30.40 
29.28 
32-73 
23.11 

22.79 
18.96 
21.95 
1569 
22.95 
19-35 
22.30 

15-91 
25-37 
27-65 
■9-34 
21.84 
19.92 
13-70 
24.09 
18.31 
23-79 

16.05 
14-23 
11.22 
21-55 

13-43 
18.81 
17-56 



12.14 

25-57 

23-&2§ 

17.03 

16.50 

'3-38 
12.21 
10.27 
18.51 
13-99 
11.23 

11.66 
14-35 
15-84 
18.85 
22.76 
20.88 
14.02 



6-95 
10-55 
5.80 

4-73 
10. 17 
7.68 
9.62 
9-25 
5-93 
8.30 

5-47 
6.18 
4.48 
4.80 
6.07 
11.76 
5-74 
5-55 

6.60 

10.65 
5-63 



5-50 
8-49 



8.15 
5-16 
6. 10 
6.04 
4-3° 
7-33 
8-39 
6.08 
6.71 
7-53 
10.85 
8.80 
5-U 
5-61 
6.06 
5-54 
5-37 
8.42 
6.61 
5-54 
6.12 

5-67 
4.38 
6.42 
5-65 
6-73 
4-95 
5-54 
4.01 
7.02 

7-93 
4.12 
8.20 
5-58 
3.60 
8.91 
5-30 
5-55 

4-53 
3-94 
2-73 
7-47 
3-23 
4-55 
4.22 
3- 01 
2-95 
9.61 
5-37 
5-37 
6. 10 

2.75 
3-<>7 
2.65 
5-47 
3-58 
4.58 

3-45 
3.00 
2.94 
5-19 
6.s8 
5.78 
2.84 



Aug. 
June 
..do. 
Aug. 
June 
..do. 
..do. 
Aug. 
May 
..do. 
..do. 
Aug. 
July 
Aug. 
May 
June 
May 
..do. 

..do. 
June 
July 



May 
June 



July 
..do. 
June 
..do. 
July 
June 
..do. 
May 
..do. 
June 
July 
June 
..do. 
..do. 
July 
Aug. 
..do. 
June 
Aug. 
..do. 
June 

..do. 
..do. 
July 
June 
..do. 
. do. 
May 
..do. 
June 
..do. 
..do. 
..do. 
..do. 
..do. 
..do. 
..do. 
Aug. 

June 
July 
Aug. 
June 
..do. 
..do. 
..do. 
July 
..do. 
June 
..do. 
..do. 
July 

May 
..do. 
July 
May 
..do. 
Aug. 

May 
..do. 
Mar. 
Aug. 
..do. 
..do. 
May 



o. lot 
0.08 
0.01 

O. 10$ 

0.15 
0.31 

0.07 
0.14 

O. 12 
O.O5 
O.08 
O.O7 
O.I3 

T. 

0.09 

0.07 

0.13 

T. 

T. 

0.03 
0.27 
0.05 

T. 
0.23 
0.40 
o. 14 

T. 

T. 
0.17 
o. 01 
0.05 

O. II 

0.18 
0. 10 

°-i5 
0.20 
0.20 

T.i 

0.00 
o. 17 
0.05 
0.32 
o-35 

T. 

T. 

T. 

0.04 
0.09 

T. 

T.t 

T. 

T. 
0.07 
0.20 
o. 12 
0.00 
0.05 
0.00 
0.20 

T. 
0.05 
0.12 
0.16 

o. 10 
o. 10 

T.t 

T. 

O. <Xj% 
O.O4 
O.08 

T. 

0.00 
0.03 
0.04 

0-15 

0. oo£ 

T. 

T. 
0.00 
0. 10 
o. 11 
0.00 

0.00 
0.25 
o. 4 it 
0.00 

0-15 
o. 10 
o. 10 



Sept. 
Jan. 
..do. 
..do. 
..do. 
Apr. 
Jan. 
Dec. 
Jan. 
..do. 
..do. 
..do. 
Feb. 
Sept. 
Jan. 
..do. 
..do. 
..do. 

..do. 
..do. 
..do. 
..do. 
..do. 
..do. 
..do. 
..do. 
..do. 
..do. 
..do. 
..do. 
..do. 
..do. 
..do. 
..do. 
Sept. 
Jan. 
Sept. 
Jan. 
..do. 
..do. 
..do. 
..do. 
..do. 
..do. 
..do. 
..do. 

..do. 
..do. 
..do. 
..do. 
..do. 
..do. 
..do. 
..do. 
..do. 
..do. 
..do. 
Oct. 
..do. 
Jan. 
..do. 
..do. 
..do. 

..do. 

..do. 
Oct. 
Jan. 
Oct. 
Jan. 
Dec, 
Oct. 
Sept. 
Jan. 
..do. 
Mar. 
Oct. 

Sept. 
Nov. 
Sept. 
Jan. 
..do. 
Sept. 

..do. 

Nov. 
Jan. 
Sept. 
Dec. 
Jan. 
Sept. 



ii-3 
10.7 



19.0 
38.2 
16.4 
11. 1 
14-3 
'5-9 
12.6 

15-9 
11. 9 
29.2 
13-7 
16.5 
20.9 



9.0 



38.0 
13-2 
28.0 
23-7 



25.0 
7.8 
26.4 
20.3 

24.5 
19. 1 



25.0 
31-3 
34-5 
17.: 

23-5 
26.0 
38.2 
13-5 
35-3 
32.5 
18.0 
21.0 
i°-5 

20.1 
12.0 
10.9 



'3-0 
■7-5 
14-7 
21.0 
18.6 
14.0 
32.5 



13-7 



20.5 
15-8 
10.3 

9-6 
7-3 

21.7 
14-5 
■5-2 
20.7 
32-8 



23.0 

24.8 
17-4 
6-5 
11. 



3'-5 
27-3 
34-2 
18.5 
19.8 
14.0 



37-0 
48.9 
40.5 



64 
92 
69 
54 
69 
102 
64 
66 
70 
97 
73 
89 
61 
82 
58 
69 
73 
74 

52 
72 
83 



163 
149 



184 



140 
199 



205 
123 
117 



97 



189 
145 



214 

168 



185 
226 
189 
83 

174 



151 



118 
29 
76 
131 
118 
207 
172 
160 
197 



156 
163 
216 

243 
167 



257 
171 
175 
143 
150 
152 
1S9 
198 



121 

177 



215 



120 
290 
168 
161 
206 
187 
134 



130 

159 



167 



17S 
263 
'77 



126 
'79 



183 
82 



89 
170 
135 



[96 



no 
156 



112 
97 



136 
73 
76 

190 
133 



175 
318 
222 
133 
"7 

45 
129 

33 



117 
97 

34 

68 
115 



48 
US 
114 
102 

133 
124 

57 
9« 



113 
U5 



80 



177 
41 
142 
121 
107 
121 
126 



180 
185 



'33 
144 



120 
54 
107 



7' 
72 
"3 



44 
66 
100 
92 



So 



72 
18 
67 
101 
140 
"3 
64 
172 
80 



92 

105 
115 

54 
83 



60 
79 
76 

120 
82 
89 

119 
76 



131 
73 



49 



85 



68 
34 
55 
83 
52 
57 
105 



102 
62 



78 



nw. 

se. 

se. 



nw. 
nw. 
nw. 



nw. 
nw. 
nw. 



s. 

nw. 

n. 

sw. 

n. 

se. 

se. 

s. 

s. 

se. 

s. 

se. 

s. 



s. 
nw. 



se. 
s. 



se. 
se. 



nw. 
nw. 
nw. 



n. 

n. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

n. 

s. 

nw. 

nw. 



se. 
ne. 



nw. 
nw. 
sw. 
nw. 

s. 



nw. 

nw. 

w. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

sw. 
nw. 
nw. 
nw. 
nw. 
nw. 



* Temperature data from thermometers not self registering. t Same temperature occurred on more than one date. \ Occurred in more than one month. 

II R.R.Douglas' report for March used to complete year's record. § W.S.Burdick's report for February, March, and August used to complete year's record 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



Year 1899. 






Honthly and annual mean temperature for the year 1899, with departures from the normal. 



Stations. 



Northeastern Sec. 

Agee * 

Blair 

Columbus 

Creighton 

Fremont 

Hartington 

Hooper* 

Lynch 

Madison 

Norfolk 

Oakdale 

Omaha 

O'Neill 

Santee 

Stanton* 

Tekamali 

Wakefield 

Westpoint 

Southeastern Sec. 

Arborville* 

Ashland 

Auburn 

Aurora* 

Beatrice 

Crete 

David City 

Dawson 

Edgar* 

Fairbury 

Geneva 

Harvard 

Hebron 

Lincoln 

Nebraska City 

Rulo* 

Seward* 

Superior* 

Tecumseh 

Turlington 

Weepihgwater * 

Wymore* 

York * 

Central Sec 

Albion 

Ansley 

Ashton* 

Brokenbow * 

Callaway 

Central City* 

Dunning* 

Ericson* 

Genoa 

Gothenburg 

Grand Island 

Kearney* 

Lexington 

Loup * 

North Loup 

Ord* 

Ravenna 

St. Paul* 

Southwestern Sec 

Alma 

Arapahoe* 

Beaver City 

Benkleman* 

Bluehill* 

Curtis 

Franklin 

Haigler* 

Hastings * 

Holdrege* 

Imperial 

McCook* 

Madrid* 

Minden 

Redcloud* 

Republican * 

Wllsonville* 

Western Sec 

Camp Clarke 

Gering 

Kimball 

Lodgepole 

Nesbit 

North Platte 

Seneca* 

Whitman* 

Northwestern Sec 

Alliance* 

Fort Robinson 

Hay Springs 

Kennedy 

Kirk wood * 

Springview 

Valentine 



January. 



19. i 
24. c 

19.8 
20.0 

25-1 

20.4 

21.0 
20.0 
22.7 
21. I 

23.2 



20.7 

23- 

22. 

18. 

22.6 

21-5 



22.6 

23- 

2S. 

24. 
21.8 

21.9 
22.0 

20.8 



24. 
25. 

26. 

25- 

28. 

2.S- 
26. 
25- 
'23. 

28. 
25-3 



26. 

27-5 
22.4 
24.8 



21.4 



+ r.9 



February, 



+ 0.5 



o-3 



+ 1.0 



+ 0.7 

— 7-<- 

— 1.4 

— 1-3 

— 4.5 

— 1.8 
+ 4-8 

0.0 
+ 1-4 

— 0-5 

— 3 

— 2.7 
+ 1.4 



o-3 
2.4 



2.9 
0.9 



+ 1.4 



+ 1.0 

— 0.5 

— 2.0 
+ 4.2 



2.6 

2.6 



1.8 



March. 



-10.3 



-10. o 
- 9-2 

-8.4 

-10.2 



-IO.5 



-II. 2 
-IO.9 
-IO.3 
-9-6 

-6-7 

- 8.5 

- 9-4 



-11. 1 
-9.8 
-10.5 
-10.3 

- 8.8 

- 9-9 

- 7 



-10.2 

- 9-3 

-11. 8 

- 9-3 

- 7-4 
-11. 4 
-11.9 
-10.6 
-10.4 

- 8.7 
-10.7 



-11. 1 
-"•5 
-15 
-11. 2 
-12.4 
- 9 
-11. 4 
-9.6 



- 9-9 
-12.8 
-'3-3 
-Il.o 



-10.9 
-14.9 



-14. 
-14.8 



-'3-7 
-12.8 
-12.8 
-10.7 



• 3 

• 3 + 



19. 

17.8!- 
21.0I + 



•1-9 
4-9 

8.1 
7-4 
II. 4] 
11. 7 
10.4 

'3-1 
9.0 

10.4 

8.5 
9.8 
8.4 

10.6 
9-' 
9-4 
9.6 



— 12.3 



-16.4 
-15-3 
-13-7 
-14.2 

-12.5 
-16.8 
-10.3 

-11. 6 
-14.4 
-12.7 
-12.3 



21.7 
23-7 
=5-9 
21.2 
26.0 
18.2 
25-4 
22.2 

21.8 
22.2 
22.2 
26.8 
21.7 
21.6 

24.2 
25-4 
21-5 
24.2 

25.8 
27. C 
3°-4 
28.6 
29.2 
27-1 
26.7 
3'-9 



-8.3 



- 7-4 

- 8.2 

- 7 
-10.8 



7-9 



29 

29 

28.6 

3°.« 

27.8 

29.0 

34-2 

27-3 

32.4 

29- 5 

27.8 

25-3 

31-3 

27.8 

+26.0 
26.4 
26.3 
28.9 
27.8 
23-5 
23.8 
22.5 
25-4 
31-6 
28.4 

31- 

28.0 
26.1 
27.2 

24.8 
27-3 
28 

33-0 
31.8 
32.8 
32.4 
29.6 
31.0 
32.0 
34-2 
27-4 
24.1 
31.8 
31.6 
27.4 
28.3 



3>.8 
30.8 

29.8 
26.4 
29.2 

29-5 
26.2 
27.6 
27.2 
26.4 

24.0 
23.8 
20.5 
24.2 
20.6 
21. 1 
23- o 



7-5 
7-8 
8-7 
7.8 
9.2 
7.0 



6.8 
8.3 
6.2 

4-9 

5 

7-5 
3-9 



6.7 

4-7 

6 

9.4 

7 

5-7 

9 

3-5 

7-i 

5-4 

7-8 



April. 



47-3 

48.3 

49.0 

47.6 

49.6 

45-8 

50.0 

53-2 + 

47-6 — 

47-8 + 

48.0 — 

50.6 

47.6 — 

49-4 + 

5<M + 

48.5 

48.4 

5°-3 



— 2.6 



45-8 
5'-° 
52.1 
50.0 
50.2 
51-8 
53-4 
52.6 
54-o 
51-5 
5i-3 
49-8 
52.0 
5"- 8 
+51-3 
55-2 
5'-3 
57- u 
5°-! 
50.7 
47-1 
53-5 
51.7 

+49-3 
5°-I 
5°-i 
45-9 
46 - 
50. S 



- 6.0 

- 6.1 
-4.6 

- 5 
-10.6 

7-6! 42.2 



8.4 
7.0 



4-3 
2.4 
7-6 



5-3 



-6.4 



5-2 
3-7 



6.1 

4-3 



5-7 
9-1 

3-1 
5-5 
6.3 

6-5 



5-6 



■ 4-4 

■ 3-2 

■ 3-i 

■ 4-9 

■ 7.o 



9-1 
8.9 
6.8 



9.6 
7-4 



47- o 

50.0 

54 

5'-4 

55-9 

48.8 

48.5 

49-6 

48.4 

5^-2 

5"-8 

52.6 

52-4 

52.6 

5"- 4 

5<-3 

47 

51-7 

5'-4 

49- o 

52.2 

54 

5°-4 

45-o 

50.0 

48.8 

5'-2 

5°-7 



47-6 
47-4 
46.0 
46.6 
47-4 
48.8 
48.4 
1.0 44-4 



44-9 
46.2 

43-5 
46.6 
46.7 
46.4 
47-4 



May. 



3-6 
2.5 

2.3 
2.2 
2. 1 

0.4 

3-8 



+ 0.8 



0.4 

'•5 
1.2 

2-7 
3-7 
3-5 
1-9 
3-1 



- 2.3 

— 0.3 
+ 0.3 



— 1.6 

— 2.9 

— 5 

— 2.0 
+ 0.7 
+ 
+ 
+ 4.1 

— 2.3 



— 0.9 

— 0.9 



— 1.2 

O.o 

— 1.0 

— 5-6 

— 0.9 



— 1.3 
+ I.I 

+ 3-9 

— 2.2 

— 3 

— 1.0 

— 5-2 

— 3-2 

— O. I 



+ 1.5 

— 0.8 

— i-3 
+ 0.7 
+ 0.2 
+ 0.7 
+ 1-3 

+ 0.7 

— 0.9 

i-5 

o. 2 



— 1.6 

+ 0-5 



58.3 

60.2 

60.4 

58.8 

60. 6 

57-4 

64.2 

6i 

58.6 

59-4 

59-5 

62.3 

57-8 

60.9 

60.7 

60.4 

60.0 

62.0 



64. 

62, 
61. 
62. 
62. 

b 63. 
68. 
62. 
66. 
63. 
62. 

59- 
6.5. 
61. 

59-2 
58.8 
60.4 
55-5 
58.2 
61.2 



61.4 
60.6 
59-4 
61.8 
62.0 
61.0 
59-i 
59-6 
58.4 
60.0 
61.4 

61.8 
64-5 
63.8 
62.4 
63.1 



64.6 
65.4 
61.8 



59-6 
64.0 

57-9 
61.7 



62.5 
63.4 

56.0 

54.2 

54-5 

56 

56.8 

58.2 

5' 

52.5 

53-7 
53-1 
52.8 
57-4 

+57 
56-2 

T56.8 



+ 1 
+ 1 
— o 



+ o 



+ 



+ 1 



+ o 
o 

— 6 

— o 

— 3 



+ 

— 1 

+ 1 

+ 1 
+ 



+ 3 



+ I 



+ 1 



+ 1 



I 

— I 

— 0. 
6 

— 2 

+ o 

— 3 

— 2 
+ o 



— 1.3 
+ 0.2 



June. 



+ 

+ 1 
— o 



+ 

+ D 

+ I 

+ 

+ 

+ 

— o 

+ I 



+ I 

— o 
+ o 

— 2 

— o 
+ o 

+ 4 



+ 4 



+ o 



+ o 

+ I 

— 3 



+ 1 



+ I 

— 
+ o 

— 4 



+ 1 



+ 1 



— 1 
3 



+ o 



July. 



— 2.1 



+ 0.4 

— 0.8 

— 3-o 

— 1.4 



72.5 

72.8 

72.5 

72.9 

72 

72.0 

72.3 

73-4 

71.4 

72.7 

72.4 

75- o 

7i-5 

75-8 

72 

73-2 

72.4 

74.0 

72.9 — 2 
74.8— 2 
75.6— 



-4 — 3 
.6— 1. 
•5— I. 
.6 + 2. 
■ 7 



75- ° 
71-7 

72.8 
73-2 
74-4 
74-4 



74.8 
79.0 
75-5 
74-8 
72.3 
76.9 
74-4 

7°-3 

71.4 

75 

71.8 

72.0 

75-3 

70.0 

75-2 

74.2 

71.9 

74 

77-4 

71.0 

71.2 



73- ° 
71.8 
75-o 

73-9 

7°-5 
75-9 
73-6 
74-4 
73-8 
75-4 



73-o 



73-7 
74-5 
77-8 
72.4 
74-9 
75-8 
76.5 

75-8 
72.8 
69 

T70.8 
71.8 
72.6 
72.8 



69. 1 
72.0 
72.0 
72.2 
72.4 
76.0 
73-6 



'•3 
1-7 

— 0.6 
1.0 
1.0 
1-5 
0.6 

— 1-5 
1.7 



'■7 



— 1.2 

— 2.3 

— 3-o 

— i-7 

— 1.6 



— 1.7 
+ 1.2 

— 2.4 

— 2.2 

— 1-3 



-3-6 



— >-9 

— o. 1 

— 3-9 

— 1.6 

— 3.3 

— 2 

— 2.3 

— 0.8 

— 3-2 
0.0 

+ 

— 1.0 



— 2.0 

— 1.2 



+ O.9 

— 2.9 

— 1.5 

— 2.6 

— °-7 



— 2.3 

— 2.4 
+ 1-5 

— 3-2 

— 3-0 



1. 1 



+ 0.4 

— 2.6 
+ 0.3 

— 2.1 

— 0.8 
0.2 



2.8 

— o. 

+ 0.7 

— 1.2 



August. 



September 



+ 1.3 
+ °-3 



+ J 

+ 1 

+ o 

+ 9 



+ o 



+ I 

+ 3 



+ 3 



+ 2 

— o 

+ 4 

+ -> 
+ I 



+ 3 



+ 1 

+ o 

+ 1 

+ 3 



+ 2 



+ 

+ 1 

+ I 

+ 2 

+ O 

+ O 

+ 2 

— O 



— I 

+ 4 



64.0 — 
64.4 ... 
64.2 — 
60.7 — 
63.8- 
61.6 — 
62.7 
61.3- 
63.6- 

62.6 — 
62.4 
66.4 + 

60.7 — 
66.0 + 
61.6 — 
64.4 — 
63.1 
66.0 



66.2 — 

67.0 — 

65-4 — 

63.1- 

65-4 

64.4 

64.0 

68.4 

70.7 

66.2 

65-2 

65-7 

67.4 

66.7 

65-9 
67.9 — 
65.6 — 
65-9 — 
65- 
66. 
61. 
65. 
°5- 



60.8 
62.0 
65.6 
58.6 
61.4 
65-4 



6 — 



— 1-7 

— 1-5 

— 4-9 

— 0.9 



65-5+ I 
63.6 — o 
66.4 + 1 
65- 2 — 3 
64.2 
62.3— 3 
65.0 + o. 

62.9 

64.8 — 0.6 
65.2 



"66.6 
64 

68.4 
64.6 
69.6 

'66.3 



2-3 



65.6 

67.1 

65.6 

67.0 

61. 

66.6 

66.7 

63.5 
67.0 

65.7 
63-3 
62.9 
62.9 

64.0 

64.7 
61.4 
62.7 

63.6 

60.9 

62.0 

62. 

60. 

65 

63 



0.4 
2.4 
0.6 
1.3 

2.5 
1.8 

1.3 

1.9 
O.I 



+ O.9 

+ O.4 

+ 1.6 

— 0.4 

+ 1.7 

— 0.9 

+ 



— 1. 
+ 0.9 

— o-3 

8 +'o! 7 
1 + 0.9 



October. 



November 



+ 4 



+ 5 

I s 

+ 4 

+ 4 

+ 6 

+ 1 

+ 2 

+ 9 

+ 5 



+ 9 



+ 4 
+ 3 



+ 6 

+ 

+ 6 

+ 1 

+ 1 

+ 1 

+ 4 



+ 3 

+ 



+ 3 

— 1 

+ 5 

+ 1 



+ 3 



+ 5 



+ 1 

+ -• 



— 3 

— 2 



+ 1 
+ '2 



3 

4 
9 + o. 



3 — "• 
o + o 



December. 



+12 



+ 
+ 10 

+ 9 

+ 10 



+ia 
+11 

+ 9 
+ 10 

+10 
+10 

+ 9 
+ 9 



+ 8 
+ 9 
+ 9 
+ 10 
+ 

+ 9 
+ 10 



+10 

+ 8 
+ 8 
+ 8 
t 8 
+ 9 
+ 8 
+ S 
+ 11 
+ 8 
+ 10 
+ 6 



+ 7 



+ 7 

+ 9 

+ 7 

+ 8 

+ 4 



2 +IO 

3+6 
7 +10 
8+6 
1 + 7 
6+ 7 
3+ 8 



+ 7 

+ a 



9 
7 
+ 6 

7j+ 5 
8|+ 9 
4+4 



+ 6 
+ 9 
+ 
+ 
+ 



+ 10 

+ 8 
+ 7 

+ 10 

+ 9 

+ 10 
+ 14 
+ 7 



23.6 

23-9 
25.8 
20.8 
25-4 
20.3 

23-5 

23-8 

24-3 

23 

22.6 

25-7 

23.2 

23.1 

21.8 

25-4 

22.9 

24.6 



Annual. 



'•5 



1-5 

— 2.6 

0.0 

2.9 



— 0.8 

— 0.2 

— 0-3 
-3-8 

— 1.0 

— 2.2 
+ 1.6 

— 2.2 

— 0.8 



6 
G 
8 
9" 
9 + 
1 — 
6 ... 



2-3 
1. 1 

3-8 



26. 
126. 

25- 

27. 

25- 

!--'5- 
29. 
24. 
28. 
26. 
25- 
22.5 
21.6 
25-3 

k 24.5 
24.8 
25.4 
24.9 
27-5 
25-4 



24.4 
26.9 
26.8 
25-9 
27.2 
25.6 
24-7 
23.0 
25-7 
25 

28.4 
28.6 
30.2 
27.6 
'23.0 



28.2 
30.2 
24.6 
3°-3 
28.4 
29.7 
26.8 
25.8 
28.2 
28.6 
27.5 

26.8 
27.2 

28.4 
26.2 
25-7 
27-5 
22.6 
25-4 



— 2.8 



-3-6 

— 0.7 

— 3-9 
+ 0.1 

— 3-0 



0.0 

— 2.6 

— 3 

— 3 

— 2.2 

— 1.6 

— 2 



3-5 
3.4 



— 1.6 

— 1.6 

— 6.0 



— 2.9 



+ 2.7 

— 0.6 

i-7 
0.0 

— 2.4 
0.0 

+ 0.3 

— 1.4 



49 



— 3-7 

— "-3 
0.4 

1.3 

0.0 

— 4-3 

— 0-3 



24.8 — 0.2 
26.0 — 2.5 
23.8— 1. a 
23-4 — 5-2 
19.8— 3.8 



20 8 



6.5 



49 



45 



0.7 



+ 0.6 

0.0 

4- 0.2 

— 0.8 



0. 1 



+ 0.1 

— 0.3 
+ 0.6 

— 1.0 
+ 0.5 
+ 0.7 

— 0.6 



— 0.6 

— o-5 

— o.4 

— 1-3 

— 0.3 
+ 0.6 
+ 2.4 



— I.I 
0.0 

— o-5 

— 0.2 
+ 0.9 



— 2.1 
+ 1.0 

— 0.2 

— 0.1 

— 1.2 



1-9 



— 0.9 

— 0.2 



+ 0.8 



+ o-3 
0.0 

— 1.3 



"■3 



1 etc., indicate number of days missing from record; \ 2 days; c , 3 days. etc. 
* Ob.-erved readings. + One day missing from record. 



Year 1890. 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



Monthly maximum temperatures for the year 1899, with dates. 



Stations. 



January. 



February. 



March. 



April. 



May. 



June. 



July. 



August. 



September. 


Octo 


B 




a 


a 




3 


a 




a 


x 


a 


M 


a 


a 


d 


S 


a 


a 



November. 


Decei 


a 




a 


3 




3 


a 




a 


P 


0) 


X 


ed 


a 


C3 


a 


a 


S 



Northeastern Sec. 

Agee* 

Biair 

Columbus 

Creighton 

Fremont 

Hartington 

Hooper * 

Lynch 

Madison 

Norfolk 

Oakdale 

Omaha 

O'Neill 

Santee 

Stanton* 

Tekamah 

Wakefield 

West Point 

Southeastern Sec 

Arborville* 

Ashland 

Auburn 

Aurora * 

Beatrice 

Crete 

David City 

Dawson 

Edgar* 

Fairbury 

Fairmont 

Geneva 

Harvard 

Hebron 

Lincoln 

Nebraska City 

Pleasanthill * 

Rulo* 

Seward* 

Superior* 

Tecumseh 

Turlington 

Weepingwater * 

Wymore* 

York* 

Central Sec 

Albion 

Ansley 

Ashton* 

Brokenbow* 

Callaway 

Central City* 

Dunning* 

Ericson* 

Genoa 

Gothenburg 

Grand Island 

Kearney* 

Lexington 

Loup* 

North Loup 

Ord* 

Ravenna 

St. Paul* 

Southwestern Sec 

Alma 

Arapahoe* 

Beaver City 

Benkleman * 

Bluehill* 

Curtis 

Franklin 

Haigler* 

Hastings* 

Holdrege* 

Imperial 

McCook* 

Madrid * 

Minden 

Redcloud* 

Republican* 

Wilson ville* 

Western Sec. 

Camp Clarke 

Gering 

Kimball 

Lodgepole 

Nesbit 

North Platte 

Seneca* 

Whitman * 

Northwestern Sec 

Alliance * 

Fort Robinson 

Hay Springs 

Kennedy 

Kirkwood * 

Springview 

Valentine 



21+ 



171 



22+ 



21 t 



19 

19 

19 

19 

'9 

JOT 

19 

21 

19 
20 
■9 
■9 



19 

19 

19 

19 

19 

,qt 

19+ 

i6t 

[g 

19 

■'9 

16+ 

19 

'9 

18 

19 

19 



19+ 
15 

,yt 

'9 



IQ 
19 
27 
27 

'9 

14 
18+ 

15 

'9 
19 
18 
'9 
19 
19 
19 



24+ 
8 



27 

I3t 

13 

12 

28 
29 

28 
24+ 



21+ 

28 

26 

28 

26+ 

28 

26+ 

12 

12+ 

261 

29 

26+ 

28 

26 

28 

12 

28 

26 

28 

12+ 

27 

25 

12 

26 

26 



24 
If. 
12+ 



27t 
12 

13+ 
26 
12+ 
28 



I2t 



86 
100 
89 
88 
90 
87 
90 

93 

88 
88 
87 
85 



90 



16 

31 

26 

15+ 
12 
11 + 



3° 

15 
II 
26+ 
11+ 

15 
11 

30 

3° 
3° 
15 
3" 
3° 
3° 



3' 
31 
26+ 

3° 
3° 
3° 

l.S 
27 

28 y 

15 

y 

31 

3° 

26 

27 

3° 



9+ 
3° 
26 
28 
31 



27 

3° 

11 

3° 

28 

31 

3° 

11 

24 

30+ 

30 

3° 
3° 
9+ 
10 
30 
11 

25 + 
11+ 

30 



105 
93 
95 
98 

91 
94 
94 

102 
94 
97 

102 
96 

i°3 
102 
98 
94 
95 
93 

100 
96 
97 
97 
97 
95 
99 
98 
99 
93 



90 
97 
98 

97 
100 
98 
94 
99 
99 
98 
97 
93 



94 
i°5 
106 
102 
104 

92 
100 
102 

97 
•°3 
1 01 

98 
105 
100 
102 
100 
104 
100 

103 

104 
IC8 
106 
98 
102 
100 



9+ 



11+ 
30 
31 + 
3>3 



9 
9+ 

25 
12+ 



25+ 



ill 
26 



107 
106 

96 
i°5 

90 
102 
103 

102 
101 
98 

102 

99 

100 
96 
96 

96 
101 

96 
104 
l°5 

IOI 

IOO 



100 

93 
91 
95 
90 

93 
90 

IOO 

92 

94 
95 
92 
98 

IOO 

92 
92 
93 
96 

97 
95 
96 
°5 
95 
92 
92 
99 



96 

IOO 

96 
93 
93 
94 
92 
94 



11+ 

II 

10+ 

21 + 

11+ 

25 

10 

11+ 

20+ 

10 

20+ 

10+ 

12+ 

20+ 
17 



26 
25 
28 
28 
10 
26 

"it 

12 

lor 



96 
95 
94 
97 
96 
98 
92 
99 
95 
96 

100 
95 
99 

104 

94 
96 
97 
94 

104 
97 
99 

104 
98 
99 



25+ 
25 
10+ 
1 + 



st 



91 

IOO 

98 

99 
93 

98 
97 

91 
95 
97 
92 
98 
94 
100 

IOI 

97 
97 
99 
9 S 
96 
100 



31 
26+ 
23 
10+ 

29 
23+ 

10+ 
10+ 
10+ 
4+ 
26 



104 
103 
100 
99 
99 
98 
99 
104 
101 
97 
102 
100 

97 

96 



95 

99 
102 

96 
103 

92 



104 

99 

103 
103 
96 
9S 
100 



95 
95 

96 
100 
104 
102 
91 
99 



25t 



25+ 



107 
100 
i°5 
i°5 
104 



95 

'106 



97 



106 
94 
95 

98 



103 
104 
9t 
102 

l°5 
101 
96 



-5 
5 
25 
10+ 

7t 
9 



22+ 

25 

i 9 r 

25 

25 

25 



107 
102 



96 
102 
100 
i°5 

IOI 

105 

104 



97 



97 
97 
92 
93 

94 
98 
101 
97 
95 
92 
96 



10+ 
28 



29 
10+ 



28 
29+ 



IO+ 
3 



23 
9 

-"3 
10 
22 

4t 

3 
10 

3 

9+ 

28 

28 
29 



94 
99 
99 
94 

100 



93 
99 
101 
102 
99 
96 
95 
96 
99 
102 
100 

106 
102 

IOO 

104 

IOO 
IOO 
IOI 
IOO 
102 

103 

103 

99 

IOO 

103 

IOI 
IOO 

108 

IOO 
102 
102 
102 
IOO 

97 

98 

IOI 

99 

IOO 

106 



90 



28 

19+ 

28 



102 

104 

102 

104 

IOO 

102 
104 

103 

102 

102 



104 
102 

108 

IOO 
102 

102 



28+ 



29 
28 
28 

28+ 



22+ 

28 



15 
27 
29 
30 
28 
16 
29 

1+ 
16 
27 

9 
9 

9* 
9* 



IOI 

104 

103 

102 
102 

104 

IOO 
102 
102 

103 

IOO 

97 
99 

96 

99 



88 



95 



23 



12 

12+ 



12+ 

23 



IJ+ 



23 



23 



*3 

12+ 



7+ 



15 
17 
17 
15 

16 

17 

16 

16+ 

16 

16+ 

15+ 

9 

17 

8 

16 
16 

16 
17 

15 

9 

15 

9+ 
15 

9 
16 

15 



18 
13 

9 

9 

9 

9 

9. 
29+ 

15 

16 

16+ 

16 

16 

16 

9+ 

9 



'7 

9+ 
151 
it> 
14+ 
10+ 
16 

9 

9 

9 

9 



8t 
14 

9 
16 



9t 
16 

14 

9 
17 

9 

16 

9 
16 



24 

2+ 
23 

1 

9 
23 



23 

2 
23 
23 
23 
23 

23 



1 + 

9t 



25 
25 

25 
1 

23 



25 

26 + 



25 
25 



8+ 



♦Observed readings. 



+ Same temperature occurred on more than one date. 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



Year 1899. 



Monthly minimum temperatures for the year 1899, -with dates. 



Stations. 



January. 



February. 


a 




3 




R 






Q 


c 


£ 




« 


s 


P 



March. 



April. 



May. 



June. 



July. 



August. 



September. 


October. 


November. 


Decer 


a 




a 




a 




a 






3 




3 




3 


a 




a 




a 




a 
















a 









a 




a 
















5 


P 


3 


a 


a • 


p 


§ 



Northeastern Sec. 

Agee* 

Blair 

Columbus 

Creighton 

Fremont 

Hartington 

Hooper* 

Lynch 

Madison 

Norfolk 

Oakdale 

Omaha 

O'Neill 

Santee 

Stanton* 

Tekamah 

Wakefield 

West Point 

Southeastern Sec. 

Arborville* 

Ashland 

Auburn 

Aurora * 

Beatrice 

Crete 

David City 

Dawson 

Edgar * 

Fairbury 

Fairmont 

Geneva 

Harvard 

Hebron 

Lincoln 

Nebraska City 

Pleasanthill* 

Rulo* 

Seward* 

Superior* 

Tecumseh 

Turlington 

Weepingwater * 

Wymore* 

York* 

Central Sec. 

Albion 

Ansley 

Ashton* 

Brokenbow* 

Callawav 

Central City* 

Dunning* 

Ericson* 

Genoa 

Gothenburg 

Grand Island 

Kearney* 

Lexington 

Loup * 

North Loup 

Ord* 

Ravenna 

St. Paul* 

Southwestern Sec 

Alma 

Arapahoe* 

Beaver City 

Benkleman * 

Bluehill* 

Curtis 

Franklin 

Haigler* 

Hastings * 

Holdrege* 

Imperial 

McCook* 

Madrid * 

Minden 

Redcloud* 

Republican* 

Wilsonville * 

Western Sec 

Camp Clarke 

Gering 

Kimball 

Lodgepole 

Nesbit 

North Platte 

Seneca* 

Whitman * 

NORTHWESTERN SEC 

Alliance * 

Fort Robinson 

Hay Springs 

Kennedy. 

Kirk wood * 

Springview 

Valentine 



3° 
31 
3° 
3° 
3° 
3° 
3° 
3° 
3° 
3° 
3° 
3° 
29 

3° 
30 
3° 
3° 
3° 

3° 

29 

29 

30 

3°+ 

3° 

29 

3° 
3° 
29 
3°t 
29 
3" 
3° 
3° 
3° 
3° 
3° 
3° 
3° 
29 
29 
3° 
3° 
3° 

3° 
29 
30 
3° 
3° 
30 
30 
3° 
3° 
29 
3° 
3° 
29 
30 
3° 
3° 
3° 
30 

3°t 

31 

3' 

3" 

3° 

3' 

28 

31 

3° 



3° 



30+ 

3' 

3° 

30 

28 

30 

31 
7 

30 
3° 
30 
3>+ 
3° 



—3° 
-29 
—29 

—33 
—29 

—33 
—32 
—33 
—3° 
—35 
—33 
—26 
—33 
—33 
—33 
—29 

—32 
—29 



—28 
—28 
—32 
—33 
—27 
—3" 
—3° 
—37 
-38 
—32 
—32 
—33 
—34 
—26 
—26 
—26 

—25 
—26 
-36 
—26 

—25 
—29 

—32 
—28 

—3° 
-36 
—35 
-36 
-36 
—32 
—30 
—35 
—30 
—33 
—34 
—34 
—39 
-38 
—33 
—3° 
-36 
—32 



—37 
—35 
—23 
—34 
-36 
—39 
—31 
—3° 



—35 
-38 
—37 
—33 



—40 

—37 

—47 
—45 
—3° 
-36 
-34 
—35 
—26 
-36 

—40 
-37 
— 41 
—35 
—33 
—30 
—37 



lit 



nt 



nt 



6t 

6 

6 

6 

6 

6t 

6 
22 

6 

6 

6 

6 

5 
23 

6 

6 

6 

5 

6 
6 
6 
6 
6 

lit 
5 
6 



6 
5 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
7 
6 
6 

6 

5 

6 

6 

it 

6 
27 

6t 

6 

4 

6 

6 
14 

6 

6 

6t 

6 

6 



5 
27 
27 

6 
27 

6t 
27 

6 
31 
27 
28 
27 

6 



27 
z8t 



27 
27 
26 
26 
27 
27 
28 
3° 

27 
26 

I2t 



4t 



9 

15 
15 
9 
30 

7 
Ht 



15 
St 
8t 
9 
5 
9 



56 



13 

4t 

7 
23 

6 

6 

7 



[0+ 



24 
■ 7t 
24 
29 

25 



7+ 
19 
■7 

8 
25 
25 
'7 



23 

17 
24 
3° 
29 
8 
3° 
3°t 
27 
29 
29 
23' 
29 



17+ 



27 
28t 



3+ 
28 

4t 
24 
24 

3 



28 
3+ 
29 
28 

2 

28 

24 



23 
25 
24 
24 
24 
23 
-'4 
24 
24 
24 
24 
25 
23 
24 
24 
25 
24 
24 

31 
24 
25 
24 

25 

I2t 

23 

25 



2 4 t 

24 

23 

24 

24 

2.5 

25 

24 

5 
24 
24 
15I 
25 
25 
24 
24 

24 

23 
24 
24 
24 
24 



24 

24 

24 
24 
30 
24 
24 
24 

29t 

31 

30 
23 

24 

30+ 

24t 

24 



28 
29 
29 
29 
29 
29 

29 
29 
29 
29 
29 
29 
28 
29 
29 
30 
29 
28 

28 
29 
29 
29 
29 
29 
28 
29 
29 
28 
28 
28 
29 
29 
29 
29 
26 

29 

29t 

29 

28t 

29 
29 

29 
29 

29 
28 
29 
29 
29 
28 



29 
29 
28 
29 
29 

2Ht 

29 
28 

29 
29 
29 

29 
26 

29 1 

29t 

29 

18 



29 
29 

2gt 

17 

3" 

29 
29 
23 



29 
28 

28 

28 

27t 

28 

28 

28 

28 

28 

27 

28 

28 

28 

28 

28 

28 
28 
5 
28 
31 
28 



18 
31 
29 

31 
28 
28 

19 
27t 

7t 
I7t 
29 
29 

5+ 
17 
28t 
28 

28t 

27 
17 

28 

29+ 
16 

28t 



27 
28 
31 

zSt 

28t 

26 

2;t 
28 
28 
28 

28t 



28t 

28 

17 
28 
28t 



28 
29 

2S 

28t 
3' 

3' 

26 



31 
31 

27t 

18 

i8t 
18 



3 
3 
3 
3 

2 5 t 



— 2 

— 5 



— 7 

— 3 



— 7 

— 8 



— 2 

5 



— 1 
4 



— 9 

— 4 



— 8 

— 4 



4 

3 

6 

— 2 



— 4 
1 
4 

— 1 



— 5 
3 
9 
6 



— 4 

— 5 



4 
31 
30 
28 
3° 
30 
3° 
28t 
3°t 
29 

4t 
3° 

3t 
3" 
30 
3' 
3° 
26t 

14 
3° 
'5 

4 
28 

4 
3° 



27 

I4t 
27 
14 
28 
3° 
3° 
14 
28 
4 

I4t 
28t 
30 
30 
Ht 
14 

nt 
13 
14 
14 

Ht 
I4t 



14? 

I3t 

13 

•4 

Mt 

18 

14 

14 

14 

14 

29 

19 

H 

14 

I 9 t 

14 



13+ 

14 

14 

4 
'4 
14 
'9 
28 
23 

4t 
14 

14 
14 
■3 
14 
14 
14 
'4 
3 

I4t 
29 • 

14 
I 4 t 



* Observed readings. 



t Same temperature occurred on more than one date. 



Year 1899. 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



Monthly and annual precipitation for the year 1899, with departures from the normal. 



Stations. 



January. 



February. 



March. 



April. 



May. 



June. 



July. 



August. 



September October 



November 



December. 


a 









'.3 


« 


c) 


u 


49 


9 


o. 




o 


E9 

O. 






£ 


« 



Annual. 



NORTHEASTERN SEC. 

Agee 

Blair 

Columbus 

Creighton 

Fremont 

Hartington 

Hooper 

Lynch 

Madison 

Norfolk 

Oakdale 

Omaha 

O'Neill 

Santee 

Stanton 

Tekamah 

Wakefield 

Westpoint 

Southeastern Sec 

Arborville 

Ashland 

Auburn 

Aurora 

Beatrice 

Crete 

David City 

Dawson . . 

Edgar 

Fairbury 

Geneva 

Harvard 

Hebron 

Lincoln 

Nebraska City* 

Rulo 

Seward 

Superior 

Tecumseh 

Turlington 

Weepingwater 

Wymore 

York 

Central Sec. 

Albion 

Ansley 

Ashton 

Brokenbow 

Callaway 

Central City 

Dunning 

Erioson 

Genoa 

Gothenburg 

Grand Island 

Kearney 

Lexington 

Loup.. 

North Loup 

Ord 

Ravenna 

St. Paul 

Southwestern Sec. 

Alma 

Arapahoe 

Beaver City 

Benkleman 

Bluehill 

Curtis 

Franklin 

Haigler 

Hastings 

Holdrege 

Imperial 

McCook 

Madrid 

Minden 

Redcloudt 

Republican 

Wllsonville 

Western Sec 

Camp Clarke 

Gering 

Kimball 

Lodgepole 

Nesbit 

North Platte 

Seneca 

Whitman 

Northwestern Sec 

Alliance 

Fort Robinson 

Hay Springs 

Kennedy 

Kirk wood 

Springview 

Valentine 



0.27 
0.08 
o. 01 
o. 10 

0.15 
0.85 

0.07 
o. 16 

O. 12 

O.05 
O.08 
0.07 
0.l8 

o. 16 
0.09 

0.07 

0.13 
T. 

T. 

0.03 
0.27 
0.05 

T. 
0.23 
0.40 
o. 14 
0.05 

T. 
0.17 
0.01 
0.05 

O. (I 

0.18 

0.20 

o. 24I 
o. ool 

0.05 1 
0.32 

o-35 
T. 
T. 



0.04 
0.09 
T. 

T. 
T. 



-0-33 
-0.61 



-0.05 

-0.18 
-0.25 
-0.25 
-0.49 
-0.62 
-0.30 
-0.48 
-0.18 
-0.71 
-0.41 
-0.69 

-0.46 
-0.63 
-0. 52 
-0.25 
-0-45 
-0.49 
-0.46 
-0.71 
-0.45 
-0.78 
-0.30 
-0-54 
-0.77 
-0.62 
-0.66 
-0.72 
-0.40 
-0-57 
-1. 01 
-0.32 
-0.56 

—0-57 



0.13 
0.39 
0.72+0.19 



— 0.09 
—0.13 
+0.58 



°-53 

0.81 

1.40 

0.78 

0.38 +0.05 

0-75 +°- '3 

0.95+0.20 

0.47; — °* ' 2 

0.71 — 0.08 

—0.34 

+ 0-39 
+0.15 
+0.01 

+0-39 
— 0.06 



°-9S 
o.75 
0.86 
0.87 
o-59 



0.58 
0.80 



-0.41 
-o.c8 



-0.22 
-0-54 



o-7.S 
0.85 
0.98 
°-75 
0.82 
1.20 
0.50 
1.45 
1. os 



— c. 10 
+0.14 

—0.15 

+ 0.02 
— 0.21 
+ 0.21 
+ 0.04 
— O.24 
+ O.49 
— 0.26 
+ 0.20 

+ 0. 18 

1.291+0.64 
0.56 J— 0.37 



0.98 
0.50 
1.20 
1.60 
0.60 

0.93 
0.91 
1. 10 
0.50 



1. 10 

0.85 
0.36 
0.22 
0-55 
o-75 



0.00 
0.30 
—0.38 
+ 0.86 
— 0.62 
+ 0.03 
+0.03 

— 0.24 

+0.42 
+ 0.10 
—0.05 

0.00 
+0.07 

0.00 



r.02 
0.63 
0.81 
0.36 
0.87 
1-45 
1.28 
0-59 
0.62 
0.54 
0.80 
0.64 
0.63 
1. 16 
0.69 
0.60 
0.83 
0.62 



o.35 
0.4.S 
2.21 
0.20 
1-34 
0.77 
0.45 
2.48 
0.40 
1.40 



— 0.22 
—0.76 
— 0.91 



—0.44 

-0.38 

— 0.46 

— 0.27 

—0.8 

—0-74 

+0.12 

—0.27 

—0.87 

— 0.22 

-0.83 



—0.84 
—0.89 
— 0.19 
—0.98 
— 0.24 
— 1.02 
—1. 19 
+ 0.46 
— 0.61 
— °-34 
1. 10+0.04 
0.96 — o. 14 
1.13—0.47 
0.70 — 0.67 
1.25—0.29 
3.401—1.46 
0.52 — 0.86 
i.ooj+o. 18 



1.50 
1.24 

0.34 
1.04 

2.15 

0.31 

1.36 

1-54 
0.71 
0.48 
1.42 
1-73 

1. 14 
2-3' 
1-33 
1.92 
0.76 
'•33 

1. 15 

1.00 
2.81 
1.08 
0.96 

1. 16 



— 2.92 
—2.83 
—0.65 
—3-32 

— 2.07 
—2.93 
—2.04 
— 1.69' 
— 1.40 
—2.80 
—0.79 
— 2.10 
— F.47 
—2.28 
—1.32 

—2.16 
—1.61 
— 0.42 
— 2.07 
— 1.46 
— 1-57 



o. so 
1. 61 
1.32 
1-54 
o. 10 

0.67 
0-55 
0.64 
0.3-' 
T. 
o. 10 



—1.28 
+0.17 
— 0.07 

—1.28 

— 0.29 

— °-75 
— 0.02 
—0.77 
—0.97 
— 1.0S 



1-52 
0.97 
1-03 
1.64 
1-39 
°-79j 



— 1.27 
—2.23 
—1-75 

— !-5° 
—2. 14 

O.83 



4.63+I.92 

1-75— 1-37 

2.05—1.53 
'•55|— 1-42 
3.201+0. 14 
3.38 +0.63 
3.05 +0.38I 
2.06 
1.30 

0-73 



3.00 
5-21 
5-19 

4.32 
6.90 
7.63 
3-74 
3-9<> 
5-93 
8.30 

5-47 
4-45 
3-4o 
2-47 
6.07 
4.00 
5-74 
5-55 

6.60 



-2.3: 



-2-51 
2.20J — 0.79 
1-75—0.95 
1.30—2.54 
0.55—1.80 
1. 25-1. 88 



4.67 

2.89 

4.60 

2-57 

2.98 

4-05 

2.29 

6.c8 

4-3° 

3-59 

3-1° 

4-79 

4 

3-74 

5-34 

2.69 

4-5° 

2. 12 
2.82 
3-C8 
2.21 
5- '2 



11.76 

3- 
5- 



-0.18 



+ 1 



+0. 

— 0.1 
+0. 

—1. 
— o. 
— o. 

— 2. 
+ 1. 
— I. 



—O.98 
— O.72 



+ 0.51 
—O.65 

+ 0.45 
+ O.44 
+ 0.27 
+ 1.42 



+ O.92 
+ 5-29 
+ 1.28 
+ 0.57 

+4-88 
+ 2.99 

— 0. 16 
+ 0.85 
— o. 03 
+ 1.07 
+0. 10 
—0.23 
+0.26 
+ '•97 
+6. ii 
—2.28 
+0.76 

+ 1.34 
+5-8i 
—0.68 
—0.84 
— 0.26 
+3-93 
+ 1.26 
—0.68 
+0.76 
—0.20 
+ 0.22 
—0.33 
+ 2.54 
+ 3-92 
—1.99 
051—0.99 
80+4.31 
6 1 + 1 . 40 
43|— >-45 

49; — 0.20 

42 +3.53 

.71 

. IJ 



6.13 

5- 67 
4-3» 
4-47 
5-65 
6.73 



+ '•75 

+ 1.66 
+ 1.64 
+ 0.30 
—0.74 
+ 1. 12 
+ 2.6S 



4.32 
2.54 
4. 11 
2-55 
2-95 
1.66 
2.52 

3-3: 



+1.78 



+1.84 

—1.25 
—1. 19 

— 1.04 



2.16 
'•35 
'•73 



3-25 
3-2: 
0.83 
3-58 



— 0.06 
+0.99 
— 1.60 
—1. 81 
—3-02 

4.481+1.98 
2.56—0.38 

— 0.06 
— 0.20 

— 2. 02 
— 0.14 



3-03 

3-54 
5-°3 



+0.81 
—0.86 
+ 0.81 



4-9' 
3-7' 
4-5o 
8.15 
2.10 
5.16 
2.61 

4-3° 
5.60 

'•47 



4.09 



6-95 

6.18 

4.03 

4-73 

9.78 

3 

4-95 

9-25 

3-23 

2. 

2. 18 
6.18 
4 

4.80 

3.61 

3-°3 
3-3' 
396 



+4.64 
+ 2.40 

+o.77 
+ 2.41 
+6.12 
+0.16 

+6.72 
— 0.09 
— 0.76 
— 0.29 
+ 2.84 
+ 1.62 
+ 2.67 
+1.15 
—0.3' 
+ 1.07 
+0.45 



+0.76 
— 0.06 
+0.87 
+ 4.02 

+0.28 
+0.45 

+o.c8 

+ 1.78 
+ '■59 
— 2.25! 
2.97I— 0.50 

6.oi| + i.88j 
+ 0.90I 
+ 0.48J 
+ 0.94! 
— 1. 12 
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5- '5 
1.85 
2.61 
4.92 
5-35 



2.'7 
4.86 
3-io 
6.42 



— 1.68 



+0.57 
+ 1.96 
+ 1.26 
+3-55 
1.40 — o. 14 
3.44 +0.46 



— 0.62 
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+ '•94 
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— 0.02 

— '•35 
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8.oo[+3.o8 
3.89i+o.95 
2.05 — 0.81 
5.54+1.85 
5-37+2.45 
3.50-0.03 

5-54 

2.64+0.61 

3.76+I.53 
3.23+0.98 
" +0.98 



2.17 
4-3' 
5.28 
2.63 
4. 16 
6-59 
6.45 
4.76 
'•35 
2.98 
2.05 
3-84 
2.43 
2.66 
4-97 



2.82 
1.85 
2.21 



— o. 10 
—1.07 

+0.41 



o. 10 
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o.93 
o. 10 
0.61 

0.44 

'•53 
0.17 
0.72 
0.86 
'•57 
o.53 
0.70 
T. 
0.41 
0.75 
0.37 
0.80 

I-'3 

0.58 
0.70 
0.90 
0.52 
0.43 
1. 10 
1.09 
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0.58 
0.17 
0.78 
0-39 
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0.92 

0-55 
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0.19 
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0.38 
1.46 
0-55 

0.83 
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-1-32 



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1.25 

0.93 

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0.77 
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— 0.96 
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—0.88 
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-0-55 
-1.80 

-1.44 
-1.46 
-1.30 
-1-25 

-0.70 

-1.66 
-2-3' 

-1.62 
-1.83 

-1.00 
-'•77 
-1.44 
-2.23 
-2.77 
-1.49 
-2.36 
-2.03 
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-2.20 



-0.20 
-0.38 
-0.86 
-0.83 
-0.27 
-0.96 



0.59—0.80 

1.62'— 0.66I 
0.95;— 0-53 
o. 4o| — 0.76 
0.781— 1.37 
1.45—0.05 

0.92I 

0.761 — 0.46 
1. 131— 0.41 
0.95—0.34 
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1—0.87 



2.26 
0-33 

0-491 
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0.97 — o 
1.84—0 
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1. 10 +0.34 
1. 19 
0.60 — 0.05 
0.661 — 0.30 

1.28J+0.42 
0.721—0.34 

o.97 

1. 18 +0.49 
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0.95— 1. 10 



2-47 
4-32 
1. 00 
3-35 
2.98 
2.05 
3-54 
'■57 
3.66 
2.92 
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3-3° 
2.58 



3-9o 
3.62 



+ 0.35 
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3.61 +0.7 

1-75 

2. 12 



+ 0.07 
+ 0.03 

+ 1-75 
+ 1.01 

4.051 + 1.68 

3. 14I+0.62 

4.18 

1. 31 —0.43 



0.84 
0.44 
0.28 
0.42 
o.45 
0.00 



0.87 
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o.73 
53 



0.78 
0.43 
1.38 
1.02 
1. 21 
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0.81 

0-79 
0.82 



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1.02 

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0.52 

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0.87 
0.65 
0.58 
0.83 
2.55 
0.98 
0.62 
0.71 
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o. 10 
1-5' 

1. 12 
0.92 
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1.26 
1.29 
0.14 
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0.74 
1.29 
0.15 
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1.07 
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1-74 
2.06 
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1.60 

'•59 
1.80 

1-33 
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1. 41 
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1.06 +0.44 
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+0.55 
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o. 60I + 0. 06 

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0.98 — 0.63 



1. 16 
0.66 
0.63 
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22.79 

18.96 

21-95 
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22.95 



I. 21 

4.07 
8.02 

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1.04 
2.03 
1. 81 
5. 12 
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0.62 
2.40 
1-37 
5.81 
0-33 

0.36 

3-43 
0.52 



0.15 

4.61 



3-34 
7-55 
2.87 
4.80 
2.76 
1-52 
4.12 
0.68 
1.40 
1.26 
0.87 
2.16 
4.27 
0.83 



— 1.91 



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T. 

0.07 
0.20 
0.12 
0.00 
0.05 

T. 
0.60 

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0.05 
o. 16 

o. 10 
0.20 
o. 10 
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— o. 52 

— 0.76 

-0.28 

-0.47 

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— 0.67 
0.26 

0.20 

O.30 

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0.31 



O.60 
O.78 
I. OO 

0.68 
0.60 



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0.00 

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0.56I+0.09 



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T. 

0.50 
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0.00 
0.30 
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T. 
1. 00 
0.50 
0.60 
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0.30 



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+ 0.03 



0.41 

0.60+0. 11 
0.32 — o. 12 
0.40 — o. 01 
0.80+0.23 
0.301 — 0.21 
o. 75i— 0-27 
T. —0.45 
1.25+0.19 
0.30 — 0.40 
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0.80 

o-59 

0.50 

o.99 
0.60 
1.40 
0.44 
o.74 
o.75 
0.90 
0.61 

0.73 

0.30 
0.60 
0.87 



-0.40 

-0-75 
-0.06 
-0.30 
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-0.29 
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-0.09 

-0.45 
-0.35 



• ■■V -r- 
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0.40 
0.60 
0.98 
0.90 
0,30 
0.40 



o. 80 



— o. 14 

0.00 

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+0.40 

— 0.09 

+ 0.02 



0.7 

I. 16 

O.9O 

0.52 

1.02 

0.20 

1.90 

O.60 

I. 10 



0-95 
0.15 
O.4O 



o. 65 0. 00 
1.50 +0.91 

o, 10 — 0.39 

—0.36 
—0.13 

—0.17 

0.43—0.56 

0.271—0.51 

0.41 — 0.42 



0.80 
1.041+0.60 



O. II 

0.20 
o. 10 



0.50 
0.70 

0.35 
0.36 



— 0.07 
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+0.19 
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— O.I I 



1.40 

1.92 
0.68 



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O. OS 
0.08 
+ O.0I 
—0.3I 
—0.28 
— O.69 
+ O.71 
+ O.05 
+ 0.13 
—0-35 
+ 0.3: 
-0-34 
+ 0.2I 



+ I.OO 
—O.26 
O.80—O.43 
O.9O +0.31 



O.83 

o. 10 

0.55 



°-55 
0.42 

0-95 



— o. 10 
—0.18 
+0.46 



0.551+0.19 0.88 
o. 56J+0.09 1.76 

0.50—0.19 2.94 
0.751+0.07 2.27 
0.44I — 0. 10] 0.88 
0.25— o. 131 o.8i 
0.45! — 0.251 '.28 



+0. 
— 0.72 
-0.44 

—0.27 
+0.48 
+ 1.21 

+0.56 

-0.33! 
—0.25! 
— o. 16I 



1.85 
1.08 
0.41 
1. 00 
0.25 
0.47 
1.24 

'•75 
1. 21 

0.86J- 
0.60 - 

1.961- 
o. 10 - 
o.50|- 
0.20,- 
'•52- 
0.26 - 
1-25- 

0.87!- 

1.00 
T. 
0.64 
0.05 
0.30 
123 
0.63 

1-35 
0.40 

0.53 
0.41 
0.65 
1. 10 

0.45 
0.82 



3.91 +1.14 



1.20 

0-75 

1.30 

1.56 
0.41 
0.71 
0.96 
0.74 



-1. 91 
-2.54 
-2.68 
-2-39 
-1.94 
-2.67 
-1-37 
-1.61 
-1. 91 
-2.53 

-2.27 
-2.82 
-1.87 
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-3-03 
-2.59 
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-0.62 
-2.76 
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-1.44 
-2-37 
-1.22 
-2.61 
-1-49 
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-3-59 



-I.I3 

-0.S7 
-0.20 
-1.30 

-'•33 



-0.87 

-1.04 
-0.26 
-0.46 



5-54 
4.01 

4-99 
4-77 
2.66 
2.47 
2.81 
2.62 
'•93 
2-77 

2.01 
0.90 
1.28 
'■25 
3-40 
2.72 
5-96 
2-13 
2.26 
7-25 
2.44 
'•57 
2-75 
2.83 
2-57 
3-18 
'•95 

2-75 

7.72 
3.67 
'•25 
5-47 
3-58 
0.15 
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3-45 
3- 00 
2.S2 
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3-03 

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+ 1.46 
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—1.62 

— 1-73 
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—0.23 
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—1.17 

— 1.24 
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— 0.92 
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—2-39 
+ 0.24 
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— 1.03 



+4.90 
+0.84 

— 1.30 
+ 2.30 
+ 0.94 
—2.44 
—0.1 1 

+0.66 
+0.37 
—0.56 

— 1. 15 
+ 0.64 
+ 1.3' 
— o-54 



4-95 
4-2.S 
2.16 
7.02 
7-93 
4.12 
8.20 
5.58 
3.60 
8.91 
5.32 

4-53 



+ 1.27 
— o. 11 
— 2.00 
+ 1.52 
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— 0.60 
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—0-33 

— 0.0 



2.86 
0.90 
7-47 
3-24 
5-6i 
3- 23 



— 1.80 
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—1.16 
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4.5.S+0.20 



4.221+0.83 
2.28 — 1. 41 
1.73 — 1.62 



9.61 
7-05 
5-37 
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1-53 

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1.06 
1.40 

2. li 

1-95 
0.80! 

'•95, 

l.3°i 
r.8o| 
1.97 
3-47 
3- '9 



2.69I — 



+4-21 
+ 1.73 
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-0.75 



1.70 
1. 71 
1.80 
2.48 
4-9° 
4.u6 
3.36 
1. 18 
0.84 

2. II 
4-73 

2-79 
I. 10 

3-94 
2.42 
2.98 
5-7o 
3-70 
2.87 
2.20 
3.60 
3-12 
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2-95 
3-39 
5.01 
3-03 
6.10 



— 1.02 
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+ 2.49 
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2.49 
4.62 
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3- 78 
5- 10 
2-39 
3 



0-74 
0.55 
1-45 
2-73 
1.42 
2-55 
2.65 
1.3' 
3-5' 



2.26 

I.90! — O.02 
2.70J+O. 19 
2.65J+O.51 
3.42I+I.27 
2.04! — O.54 
0.28 — 2.62 

o. 15.— 2.02 

I 
1.47 1.85—0.78 

i.oij 0.97 — 0.95 
0.89 I.60J — 0.69 
0-551 3- 181+0.49 
0.83J 4. ioj+o. 40 
0.51 2.61I+0.54 
0.61; 1. 341 — 1. 51 



-0.83 
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0-93 
2.90 
0.99 
2.89 
2.29 
0.70 
1-45 

2.12 
2.24 
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2.70 
1.83 
0.25 
4-58 



0.56 
0.51 
0.60 
0.53 
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0.65 
1.36 
0.89 
0.63 

0.45 
0.74 



— 2.20 
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-0.88 
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0.43 
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o.39 
o.55 



-1.60 
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0.20 
0.81 
0.50 
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0.20 
0.20 
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0.40 
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0-75 
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o.35 
0.71 
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1.44 
75 
07 



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3.68J + 1.42 
2.59+0.36 



0.00 
0.86 
0.70 
0.18 
0.20 
0.00 
0.90 
0.09 
0.25 
0.00 

T. 

o. 19 
0.00 
0.00 
0.80 
0.28 
0.00 
0.00 

0.00 
0.50 
0.41 
0.00 
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-0-39 
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0.00 
0.46 
0.00 
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T. 
0.14 
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0.30 
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o.74 
1. 19 
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T. 
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—0.18 
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1.70 
0.64 
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1-97 
0.88 
I- '5 
1.04 
1.58 



0.30 
o. 10 

T. 

T. 
1.27 
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1.94 
1.63 
0.60 

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1. 00 

0-95 

1. 00 

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0.56 
1. 14 

1.26 



+ 1.38 
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'9-35 
22.30 
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25-37 
27.65 
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21.84- 
19.92 — 
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24.09!— 
23.79!— 



1.05 
4-43 
4.71 
2.'4 
1.80 
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4.19 
2.20 
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0.54 
2.90 



0.73 
0.40 +0.08 
0.661+0. 17 
0.30 +0. 11 
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16.05 



0.50 
1.02 
0.95 
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2.00 +1.30 



o. 10 
1. 00 
1.17 
0.62 
0.50 



'4-23 

II. 12 

21.55 



+ O.26 
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+ 0.35 
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— 6.64 

- 5-24 
-6.23 



'3-43— 4.23 

18.81 - 7-79 



'7-56 



—o.33 
+0.25 
+ 0.51 
+ 0.28 
+ 0.09 



—0.41 

-0.55 

— o. 29 j 0.32 

+0.72J 0.45 



—1. 17 
+0.19 



T. —0.381 0.55 



-0. 29 O. 50 +0. 20 

-O.I3! I.70 +O.39 

-0.27 O.78I — 0.2I 
-O.76 



0.30 


—0.84 


1.69 


—0.32 


0.09 


—0.82 


0. qS 


+ 0.08 



T. 

0.25 

0.53 
0. 12 
0.67 
0.30 
o. 14 



0.15 

0.13I— 0.35 

0.30 —0.20 

+0.02 

+0.03 

— O. 2i 
+ 0.22 
+ O.06 



12.14 
25-57 
23.62 
17.03 
16.5O 

'3.38 



0.32 

0.6 



—o.45 
—0.26 
— c.23 
—0.52 
— 0.17 
—0.30 
—0.48 



0.25 
0.6q 

0.8s 
0.8S 
0.15 



0.40 



12.21 
10.27 
18.51 
'3-99 



11.23 



— o. 01 
+0.04 
+0. 16 
+0.31 
— 0. 17 



1.06 



— 2.03 

— 6.86 
+ I.23 

— 5-74 

— 5-05 



— 2.31 
-3-26 
+ 1.80 

— 6.26 



— 3-8o 



11.66 — 3.54 
'4.35!— '-6' 
15.84 — 2.84 
18.85I- 1.59 
22.76!+ 0.28 



— 0.04 



14.02 



* R.R.Douglas' report for March used to complete year's record. t W.S.Burdick's report for February, March, and August used to complete year's record. 

T., trace (when precipitation is less than 0.01 of an inch.) 



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12 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



Year 1899. 



DISPLAYMEN. 

[Figures following stations indicate number of forecasts mailed from distributing centers.] 



Stations. 


Dlsplaymen. 


Stations. 


Displaymen. 


Stations. 


Displaymen. 


Stations. 


Displaymen. 


Ansley 


Chas. R. Hare. 

Dr. A. S. v Mansfelde. 

C.J.Wilson. 

G.W.Harmon. 

C.F.Stockwell. 

J.L.Baker. 

E. A. Moore. 

Geo.B.Mair. 

Ranch Telephone Co. 

Nellie Strain. 

Carl Kramer. 

C.A.Sheldon. 

Dr. Geo. Roberts. 

W.Z.Taylor. 

S.R. Razee. 


David City 

Dawson 

Falls "City (7) 

Fairfield 


Croft & Snowden. 

E.B.Taylor. 

M.L. Libbee. 

J.A.Wood. 

J.C.Yutzy. 

M.L.Jones. 

Ranch Telephone Co. 

E.A.Barnes. 

J.T.Fleming. 

Ranch Telephone Co. 

E.D.Einsel. 

W.H.Illian. 

Daniels Bros. 

L. B. Partridge. 

U.S. Weather Bureau. 




E.S.Hayhurst. 

Madison State Bank. 

Dr.W.W.Phar. 

R.G.Strother. 

D.S. Dusenbery. 

W.N.Huse. 

J.E.Goodrich. 

U.S. Weather Bureau. 

Do. 
Chas. N.Cole. 
Jas.Milford. 
Joe Karrer. 
F.S. Col well. 
T.C. Hacker. 










Ranch Telephone Co. 
R S Oberfelder 












Sioux City, la. (15) 


U.S. Weather Bureau. 










Superior 


J 1) Stine 




North Platte (4) . . 

Omaha (54) 

O'Neill 


Dr J M Birkner 






Tilden . . 
















Ord 


W II McNeal 


Humphrey (7) 




Wauneta 


J W Hann 


Creighton (7) 

Curtis (16) 


Red Cloud (15) 


G W.Howe 


Kenesaw 

Lincoln (215) 


Yankton, S.D. (4) . 


U.S.Weather Bureau. 







CLIMATE AND CROP CORRESPONDENTS. 

[Most voluntary observers and displaymen are also climate and crop correspondents, and are not included in this table.] 



Stations. 



Adams 

Adman 

Agate 

Ainsworth 

Akron 

Do 

Alexandria 

Alford 

Allen 

Almeria 

Ames 

Arago 

Arapahoe 

Do 

Archer 

Argo 

Arlington 

Ashford 

Atlanta 

Aurora 

Do 

Axtell 

Ayr 

Ballagh 

Bancroft 

Banksville 

Bartlett 

Basford 

Battle Creek 

Bayard 

Beaver Crossing. 

Bee 

Bega 

Belden 

Belgrade 

Bell 

Belvidere 

Berea 

Berlin 

Bertrand 

Bingham 

Bismarck 

Bladen 

Blair 

Bloomington 

Bluesprings 

Bookwalter 

Bower 

Bradshaw 

Bray ton 

Brock 

Brownlee 

Brule 

Bruno 

Brunswick 

Burress 

Burwell 

Cairo 

Calvert 

Cambridge 

Camden 

Cameron 

Campbell 

Carleton 

Carpenter 

Carroll 

Cedarbluffs 

Cedar Rapids 

Chalco 

Chambers 

Champion 

Chapman 

Chester 

Clarks 

Do 

Clearwater 

Colbergen 

Cook 

Cornell 

Cortland 

Cotesfield 

Coxville 

Cozad 

Crab Orchard — 

Craig 

Crawford 

Creston 



Correspondents. 



H.J. Merrick. 

T.B. Pawling. 

Mary E.Graham. 

T.W.DeLong. 

J.H.Halligan. 

Edward Savage. 

Rev.T.H.Lillie. 

J. A.Erskine. 

R. Burgess. 

R.D.Williams. 

S.E.Miller. 

W.L.KIeber. 

A.H.Wood. 

C. E.Shopbell. 

E.D. Chapman. 

O.N.Hammarlun. 

M.C.Grover. 

Cora M. Ashford. 

M.D.Case. 

A.M. Glover. 

F.C.Putnam. 

H.F. Hooper. 

R.M.Ratcliff. 

Sarah J. Ballagh. 

H.O.Hilbers. 

W. H. Benjamin. 

W.H.Updike. 

Jerome Shamburg. 

S.K.Warrick. 

A.V.Taylor. 

J. H. Waterman. 

E.H.Noxon. 

A. Johnson, Jr. 

E.T.Crellen. 

R.L.Osborne. 

John Alcorn. 

H.E.Morgan. 

F.A.Stratton. 

J. H.McEachron. 

W.W.Lewis. 

W.C.Wood. 

H.W.Ludwig. 

P.W.Warner. 

W.W.Stockton. 

W.T.Britton. 

S.A.Smith. 

A.D.Barclay. 

Postmaster. 

A.Linsley. 

H.M.Thorpe. 

B.H.Bailey. 

J. S. Campbell. 

J.P.Krum. 

M.W.Mahoney. 

S. A. Bear. 

T.J.Harvey. 

D.S.Beznon. 

C. A. Alford. 

M.W.Nesmith. 

D.Easton. 

Elisha Kinney. 

H.C.Streator. 

J.G.Orndorff. 

J.H.Bryant. 

H.U. Carpenter. 

James Baker. 

John Yung, Jr. 

Dennis Tracy. 

S.M.Bianche. 

R.C.Wry. 

W.L.Davidson. 

E.I.Gallogly. 

Stephen Forsdick. 

R.A.Patterson. 

A.T.Gianque. 

M.C.Bressler. 

I.C.Barnes. 

J.W.Smith. 

Isaac Underhill. 

Peter Meyer. 

Thomas Blanchard. 

W.H. Kaiser. 

W.W.Smith. 

F.M.Sharrett. 

A.B.Jacobs. 

F.R.Wingfield. 

W.J.Belknap. 



Stations. 



Crete 

Cropsey 

Dakota 

Danbury 

Dannevirke 

Davey 

David City 

Daykin 

Decatur 

Deloit 

Dennison 

Deshler 

DeWitt 

Diller 

Dodge 

Dorp 

Dubois 

Do 

Dunbar 

Dunlap 

Dwight 

Eagle 

Eddy 

Edgar 

Do 

Edholm 

Elgin 

Elk City 

Do 

Elk Creek 

Ellis 

Elwood 

Emerick 

Essex 

Exeter 

Fargo 

Farnam 

Farwell 

Firth 

Fletcher 

Fullerton 

Fulton 

Galena 

Gary 

Geneva 

Genoa 

Gering 

Germantown 

Do 

Gibbon 

Gilchrist 

Gilmore 

Glen 

Gothenburg 

Graf 

Grand Island 

Grant 

Greeley 

Gregory 

Gross 

Guiderock 

Haigler 

Hainesville 

Halsey 

Hampton 

Hansen 

Hardy 

Hartington 

Hartman 

Harvard 

Hastings 

Haydon 

Haymow 

Hazard 

Hemingford 

Henderson 

Highland 

Holdrege 

Hoskins 

Hough 

Howell 

Hubbell 

Humboldt 

Huntley 

Hyannis 

Ida 

Inavale 



Correspondents. 



J.S.Brown. 

B.F.Moore. 

Mellet Schemid. 

A.J.Gillespie. 

M. A.Madsen. 

J.E.Kehler. 

J.R.Townsend. 

J.E.Flanner. 

T.R.Ashley. 

F.H.Nolze. 

Thos. Stevenson. 

J.D.Plummer. 

F.R.Wild. 

C . W . Tonnemaker. 

C.L.Browne. 

Jas. Hudson. 

W.E.Atkinson. 

A.R.Kuowles. 

C.H.Wilson. 

B.C.Fenner. 

J. P. Dunlap. 

G.W.Venner. 

S.O.Loomis. 

J. W. Connor. 

Wm. Darby. 

F. F. Loom'is. 

Anton Zirbes. 

R.F.Gaines. 

Geo.G.Sharpe. 

L.S.Waggoner. 

Robert Wriglev. 

White & Hare. 

Chas. Letheby. 

Jas.L.Balcom. 

C.N.Phillips. 

Bora Saal. 

J.B. Kitchen. 

Mike Larkowski. 

E.J. Brethou wer. 

Allen Barker. 

L.W.Morgan. 

J.S.Craig. 

S.McGooden. 

Wm.Reep. 

W.E.Propst. 

J. W. Nation. 

N.M.Snyder. 

Everett Parker. 

L. S. Callaghan. 

C.Putnam. 

F.W.Knott. 

O.M.Deemer. 

J.C.Hansen. 

A.M.Allen. 

Geo.Kohout. 

H.O.Ferrar. 

Isaiah Babcock. 

W.E.Morgan. 

Sam'l Gregory. 

B.B. Gross. 

C.E.Vaughan. 

M.N. Palmer. 

A.C.Mohr. 

J.W.Clouse. 

E.L.Ingalls. 

F.M.Frink. 

G.A.Bixby. 

C.H.Plumleigh. 

Fred'k Teppert. 

F.A.Butler. 

C.W.Winkler. 

A.J.Deets. 

A.Giacomini. 

Jno.Boecking. 

J.T.Pinkerton. 

C. A.Flippin. 

S.Snoke. 

H.O.Barber. 

Ludwig Ziemer. 

F.J. Coil. 

J.L.Soobody. 

Joseph Lamb. 

J.H.Smith. 

J.F.Deniel. 

M. E, Harmston. 

Aaron H. Kraut. 

O.R. Pitney. 



Stations. 



Indianola 

Jackson 

Juniata 

Kearney 

Keene 

Keystone 

Kimball 

Leigh 

Lewis 

Liberty 

Lisco 

Lomax 

Luce 

Luella 

McC'ook 

Macon 

Madrid 

Magnet 

Malmo 

Maplecreek 

Marsland 

Martland 

Mascot 

Mason City 

May wood." 

Mead 

Meadow 

Middleburg 

Milburn 

Milford 

Millard 

Minden 

Missioncreek 

Monterey 

Montrose 

Morsebluff 

Moulton 

Mt. Clare 

Murdoek 

Mynard 

Naponee 

Nebraska City 

Neligh 

Newark 

Newboro 

Newcastle 

Newport 

Nickerson 

North Platte 

Do 

Nysted 

Oak 

Oakdale 

Oakland 

Oconee 

Ohiowa 

Oleyeu 

Olive 

Omaha 

Omega 

Ong 

Orchard 

Ord 

Orleans 

Do 

Orum 

Osburn 

Osco 

Osmond 

Otto 

Overton 

Oxford 

Palisade 

Palmyra 

Panama 

Papillion 

Paul 

Pauline 

Pawlet 

Pawnee City 

Pender 

Do 

Peru 

Petersburg 

Phebe 

Pierce 



Correspondents. 

E.S.Hill. 

James Flynn. 

M.B.Hardin. 

H.S.Bell. 

John Swanson. 

C.Fenwick. 

Peter Larsen. 

G.W.Kibler. 

Lewis Willson. 

R.W.Kirby. 

J.C. Hudson. 

G. H.Blakeslee. 

C.H.Menze. 

M.D.Cravath. 

Chas. S.Ferris. 

Thos. Moore. 

H.C.Freas. 

Lewis Andrews. 

J.P.Frustrom. 

A.D.Brown. 

L.Snow. 

John Muir. 

A.C.Troutman. 

John Amsberry. 

W.M.Stewart. 

Gust Monteen. 

S.J.Stewart. 

W.J.Peake. 

Wm. Milburn. 

H.O.Sehaaf. 

Henry Kelsey. 

T.B.Keedle. 

T.J.Griggs. 

August Langen. 

J.J. Wasserburger. 

Cherney & Watson. 

L.D.Austin. 

F.A.Killough. 

J.L.Earle. 

W. A.Swearingen. 

J.S.Wray. 

C.W.Seymour. 

R.H.Wade. 

W.H.Merrick. 

Joseph Urban. 

A.L.Bladen. 

C.P.Wiltse. 

H.W. Herman. 

W.W. Hunter. 

J.C.Piercy. 

Ludwig Petersen. 

P.K.Hayden. 

J.H.Bretz. 

Wm. Miller. 

C.E.Chapin. 

F.J.Sieber. 

John Bauer. 

T.O.McIntyre. 

Walter Breen. 

W.E.Wisner. 

H.B.Rousey. 

James Alexander. 

W.S.White. 

W.L.Beeman. 

John Gillilan. 

W.M.Blew. 

Peter Rheinheimer. 

L.T.Meyer. 

Boyd S.Leedom. 

E.J. Peterson. 

W.H.Robbins. 

F.J.Miller. 

J.F.Hoag. 

J.W.Acott. 

H.E.Moore. 

A.H.Fricke. 

A.M.Durr. 

Lucien Dean. 

W.E.Colvin. 

J.L.Clark. 

N.H.Nye. 

D.K. Hancock. 

H.H.Whitfield. 

S.D.Phillips. 

Jesse W.Lea. 

A.L.Brande. 



Stations. 



Pilger 

Pinecamp 

Plain view 

Pleasantdale 

Pleasanthill 

Plymouth 

Princeton 

Prosser 

Purdum 

Ramsay 

Randolph 

Kedcloud 

Redwillow 

Rescue 

Reynolds 

Rising City 

Riverton 

Roca 

Rockville 

Rosemont 

Ruby 

Ruskin 

Ryno 

St. James 

St.Paul 

St.Peter 

Do 

Sandcreek 

Scribner 

Sedlov 

Shelby 

Shickley 

Silvercreek 

South Sioux City 

Spencer 

Springfield 

Springgreen 

Springview 

Staplehurst 

Star 

Stella 

Sterling 

Strickland 

Stockham 

Stuart 

Sumner 

Do 

Swanton 

Swedehome 

Tate 

Taylor 

Telbasta 

Thornburg 

Tobias 

Troy 

Trumbull 

Tyron 

Ulysses 

Underwood 

Utica 

Vacoma 

Valley 

Do 

Venango 

Verdigris 

Wabash 

Warnerville 

Washington 

Waterloo 

Watertown 

Wausa 

Wayland 

Wayne 

Webster 

Weeping Water . 

Weston 

Westpoint 

Whitney 

Willford 

Winnebago 

Winside 

Wolbach 

Wood River 

Worms 

Wyoming 

Yale 



Correspondents. 



I.B.Jeffries. 
N. F. Bruce. 
A.M.Colson. 
E.J.Newton. 
J. W. Ingles. 
J.J.Tomlinson. 
C.W.Jewell. 
A.T.Shattock. 
S.H.Oldham. 
D.C. Hooper. 
J.L.Stewart. 
C.H.Rust. 
Mrs.F.J.Helm. 
A. C.G.Williams. 
B.F.Walker. 
J.C.Perry. 
A.L.Gray. 
E.E.Blackman. 
E.H.Kittell. 
W.S.Orr. 
H.M. Bowers. 
J.E.Jones. 
L.H.McCall. 
J.G.Turner. 
I.M.Gillespie. 
U.G.Stowell. 
Geo. O.Reynolds. 
Jesse Gidley. 
W.D.Golder. 
H.Osentowska. 
J.C.Bennett. 
C.W.Price. 
J. H. Pollard. 
W.R.Wallace. 
C.E.Moffet. 
■J.G.Timberlake. 
E.A.Wyatt. 
C.L.Phelps. 
J.M.Opper. 
C.O.Btes. 
L.Fisher. 
V.Zint. 
W.I.Dunbar. 
J.W.Gray. 
James Harvey. 
E. A. La very. 
G.D.Gunn. 
L.O. Westcott. 
P.O.Chindgren. 
J.J.Brown. 
G.F.Scott. 
Edw. Schafersman. 
R.C.Walker. 
Stanley Larson. 
R.Walsh. 
J.B.Elliott. 
G.H.Daly. 
E.B.Richardson. 
Mrs. C. A. Underwood. 
J.C.Lloyd. 
H.Jacobson. 
H.M. Puffer. 
J.A.Sullivan. 
J.M.Kimball. 
G.W.Saunders. 
B.F.Allen. 
O. A. Sleeper. 
J. W. Fitch. 
A.I.McDougall. 
A. L. Fitch. 
Robert Lynn. 
Samuel Hoffer. 
A.J.Ferguson. 
A.J.Wilson. 
F.F.Everett. 
M.O.Worrall. 
J.H.Thompson. 
Wm.McCauley. 
Emma T.King. 
H.G.Niebuhr. 
R.R.Smith. 
E.A.Wight. 
S. A.Sherrerd. 
P.E.Brase. 
L. A.Kropp. 
D.B.Smith. 



■ 



M' 



! 



'"■06 

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. 



REPORT FOR JANUARY. 1900. 



NEBRASKA SECTION 



OF THE 



CLIMATE AND CROP SERVICE 



OF THE 



WEATHER BUREAU. 



PUBLISHED BY AUTHORITY OF THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE. 



UNDER DIRECTION OF 

WILLIS L. MOORE 

CHIEF OP WEATHER BUREAU 



BY 



G. A. LiOVEljRHD, 

SECTION DIRECTOR, 

Office, University of Nebraska, Lincoln. 
















OS 

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January, 1900. 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



3 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, 

Climate and Crop Service 

OF THE 

WEATHER BUREAU. 

CENTRAL OFFICE: WASHINGTON, D. C. 



NEBRASKA SECTION. 
G. A. LOVEIiAND, Section Director, 

LINCOLN, NEBK. 



Vol. V. 



LINCOLN, NEBR. 



No. 1. 



TEMPERATURE EXTREMES. 

(Taken from "Symons's Monthly Meteorological Magazine," for October, 1899.) 
(Continued.) 

" ' The author, however, has closely approximated it, hav- 
ing experienced at Fort Conger, February, 1882, the very low 
temperature of — 66.2°, and on the Maricopa Desert, Ari- 
zona, August 28, 1877, he saw the temperature of the air at 
114°, while the metal of his aneroid barometer, beside him 
as he rode, assumed a steady temperature of 144°. ' — Ameri- 
can Weather, by General Greely, page 121. 

THE HOTTEST SPOT ON EARTH. 

" ' The hottest region on the earth is on the southwestern 
coast of Persia, where Persia borders the gulf of the same 
name. For forty consecutive days, in the months of July and 
August, the thermometer has been known not to fall lower 
than 100°, night or day, and often to run up as high as 128° 
in the afternoon. At Bahrin, in the center of the torrid part 
of the torrid belt, as if it were Nature's intention to make the 
region as unbearable as possible, no water can be obtained 
from digging wells 100, 200, or even 500 feet deep, yet a com- 
paratively numerous population contrive to live there, 
thanks to copious springs which break forth from the bot- 
tom of the gulf, more than a mile from shore. The water 
from these springs is obtained by divers, who dive to the 
bottom and fill goatskin bags with the cooling liquid and 
sell it for a liviug. The source of these submarine fountains 
is thought to be in the green hill of Osman, about 500 or 600 
miles away.' — Boston Herald, 1890. 

HEAT IN WESTERN ASIA. 

" 'The heat probably reaches its maximum in the low-lying 
coast district of the Tehama on the Red Sea, and along the 
west coast of the Persian Gulf. From the bare rocky walls 
skirting both sides of these land-locked basins the sunbeams 
are reflected with redoubled strength on the glowing waters, 
thus producing an enormous evaporation, which converts the 
surrounding atmosphere into a vapor bath. For Europeans 
a trip across the Persian Gulf is considered at these times 
extremely perilous, and the unhealthy climate of the Te- 
hama has become proverbial.' — Stanford' 1 s Asia, page 127. 

A TEMPERATURE OP 122° AT NIGHT. 

" ' Advices from the Red Sea continue to describe the dis- 



comforts experienced at Suakin as very serious. The Eng- 
lish soldiers, it is said, are 'a pitiful sight;' not one man is 
in fairly healthy condition ; while even the Indian troops are 
grumbling bitterly and almost mutinous. The heat is tre- 
mendous, the frequent sandstorms are most distressing, and 
the deaths very numerous. 

"'But if Suakin is bad, Massowah, which the Italians 
have occupied, is worse. A private letter says : We called 
in at Massowah, and had to anchor for the night; and a 
more frightful, horrible night I never spent — not a breath 
of air, and the thermometer 122° Fahrenheit. This is no 
exaggeration. We were panting about the deck; the heat 
seemed to choke you; sleep was out of the question. Some 
negroes seemed to feel the heat more than Europeans, and 
were groaning fearfully, and pouring buckets of water over 
their heads, which, however, was of very little use, as the 
water was* between 95° and 100° Fahrenheit. Five Italian 
officers have committed suicide, and no wonder! Aden, after 
Suakin and Massowah, is a perfect paradise.' — British Medi- 
cal Journal, 1885. 

HIGH TEMPERATURES. 

" 'The highest temperature is met with near the level of 
the sea in the Circars, and in the Great Western Desert. 
The thermometer is recorded to have stood in 1799 in the 
northern Circars, at midnight, at 108°, and at 8 a. m. at 112° 
Fahrenheit. A land wind had blown for a fortnight. In 
the Arabian Desert the temperature of the night is remark- 
ably sultry*, being generally 100°, rising toward morning, 
and during the day being much higher. In the ' suffocating 
pandemonium ' of the great salt lake of Bahr Assal, in lati- 
tude 11° 37' 30" N., and longitude 42° 33' 6" E., 570 feet 
below the sea level, Major Harrisf found the thermometer 
at 126° Fahrenheit, though covered up, and this suffocating 
heat continued throughout the day of his encampment.' — 
Thomson's Introduction to Meteorology, page 55. 
(To be continued.) 



LATE REPORTS. 



December, 1899, Report, page 4. — Monthly precipitation, Plattsmouth, 
1.31. Monthly precipitation, Merriinan, 0.10. Monthly precipitation, 
Smithfield, 0.62. Monthly precipitation, Spragg, 0.81. Monthly pre- 
cipitation, Willard, 0.17. 



CLIMATOLOGY OF THE MONTH. 

General characteristics: The month was characterized by 
high temperature and lack of precipitation. The only Jan- 
uary with a higher mean temperature is 1880, when it was 
1.7° higher than in 1900. The precipitation was the least 
recorded during the past twenty-five years. Nearly all of 
the precipitation of the month fell in a rainstorm on the 8th 
or 9th in the eastern portion of the State. Very little snow 
fell, and the ground has been uncovered the whole month. 

Atmospheric pressure: The mean pressure was 30.16 inches, 
which is 0.06 of an inch below normal for January. The 



* Eraser's Journey into Korassan, Chapter 1, Climate of Oman, 
t Highlands of Ethiopia, Volume I. 






CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



January, 1900. 



highest during the mouth was 30.68 iuches, at North Platte 
ou the 28th, aud the lowest, 29.27 iuches, at Omaha ou the 
24th. 

Temperature: The meau temperature for the State, as de- 
termined from the records of 99 statious, was 80.2°, which 
is about 9.9° above the average of the past twenty-five years. 
The highest temperature was 72°, at Loup on the 18th, aud 
the lowest, 18° below zero, at Lynch on the 31st. The 
mean daily range of temperature, as computed from the rec- 
ords of 53 stations, was 25.4°, and the mean of the greatest 
daily range was 44.1° The greatest range at any station 
was 61°, at Lodgepole on the 2d. 

Wind: The prevailing direction of the wind was from the 
northwest. The average velocity was 8.1 miles an hour, 
which is 0.1 of a mile below the normal. The highest was 
52 miles an hour from the west, at Valentine on the 24th. 

Precipitation: The average precipitation for the State, as 
determined from the records of 130 stations, was 0.07 of an 
inch, which is 0.56 of an inch below the average for the past 
twenty-five years. The largest precipitation reported at any 
one station was 0.82 of an inch, at Plattsmouth, and the 
least, none, at several stations in the southern and western 
portions of the State. 

Snowfall: The average snowfall (in inches) for the several 
sections was as follows: Southeastern, trace; northeastern, 
0.1; central, 0.1 ; southwestern, 0.2; western, 0.1; north- 
western, 0.7. The average for the State, as determined from 
the records of 101 stations, was 0.2. 

Aurora: An aurora was observed on the 20th. 

Coronae: Corona? were observed on the 8th, 11th, 16th, 
and 18th. 

Fog: Fog was reported on the 1st, 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th, 9th, 
10th, 16th, 17th, 18th, and 19th. 

Parhelia: Parhelia were observed on the 11th, 12th, 28th, 
29th, 30th, and 31st. 

Sleet: Sleet fell on the 10th and 15th. 

Barometer, wind, and humidity table. 



Stations. 



Ashland 

Lincoln 

North Platte 

Omaha 

Valentine ... 



Barometer. 


Wind. 


Humidity 


a 


u 


oi 







03 
O 




> 




e 

tL . 

. u 
~ 3 
» 
|>.C 

< 


Maximum 

velocity. 


c 
a 








03 


6 



5 


* 


1 
* 


30.16 

30.14 
30.20 
30.13 

30.17 

1 


30.55 
30.50 
30.68 
30.51 
30.67 


28 
28 
28 
28 
28 


29.72 
29.71 
29.84 
29.67 
29.68 


24 
24 
23 

24 
23 


















7,583 

5.3^9 
6,796 
7.376* 


10.2 

7.1 

9-' 
9.9 


42 
36 

3t 
52 


nw. 
nw. 

nw. 
w. 


24 
24 
24 
24 


73 
69 

79 


33 
33 

51 


2, 
2. 









* Record missing for four and one-half hours. 
Means for the six equal sections of the State. 





Temperature. 


Precipitation. 


Number of days- 


Sections. 


Mean. 


Aver- 
age.* 


Mean. 


Aver- 

age.t 


Rainy. 


Clear. 


Partly 
cloudy. 


Cloudy. 




30.6 
28.0 
29.9 
3'-9 
30.8 
30.1 
30.2 


18.5 
15-0 
17.0 
20.8 

21.2 

17-9 

18.4 


0. 17 

0.13 
0.02 
0.02 
0. 01 
0.07 

0.07 


0.80 
0.77 
0.72 
0.69 
0.56 
0.49 
0.67 


0.9 
i-5 
0.5 
0.5 
0.4 
1. 1 
0.8 


16.5 
17.9 
19.4 
17. 1 
20.3 
20.7 

18.6 


7-8 
9.0 

7-9 
10. 1 

7-4 
8.1 

8.4 


6.6 
4.1 
3-7 
3-8 
3-2 
2.1 

3-9 









* For ten years. 



t For twenty years. 



COMPARISON OF PAST JANUARYS. 

Tho monthly maximum and minimum temperatures for several sta- 
tions have been obtained for the years 1876 to 1888, and the following 
table has been revised, and differs slightly from the comparative tables 
previously published : 



Years. 



1876 
[877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
i88i 
1882 
1SR3 
1884 
■ 885 

.886 
1887 
iSKS 



Temperature. 


Pre- J 
cipita- 








Mean. 


Max. 


Min. 


tion. j 


24.6 


59 


— 9 


0.20 


18.7 


59 


— :6 


0.98 


25.5 


59 


— 4 


0.44. 


20.9 


68 


—22 


0.80 


3<-9 


70 


— 2 


0.38 


10.8 


64 


—35 


0.91 


21. 1 


55 


— 8 


o-56 j 


n. 2 


5° 


—34 


1.04 


17-3 


5> 


—32 


0.46 


12.6 


55 


—27 


0.51 


9-9 


64 


—33 


1. 21 


15-2 


63 


—30 


0.49 


10.6 


72 


-3b 


o.47 


22.4 


58 


— 16 


0.91 



Years. 



1890 

1891 

1892 

1893 

1894 

1895 

1896 

1897 

1898 

1899 

1900 

Average for 
the past 25 
years 



Temperature. 


Mean. 


Max. 


Mln. 


16.3 


72 


—34 


27-5 


70 


— 10 


18.8 


72 


—42 


23-0 


65 


— 22 


19.4 


82 


-38 


19.0 


72 


—21 


28.4 


78 


— 20 


21.8 


66 


— 22 


27.0 


63 


— 20 


23.0 


74 


—21 


30.2 


72 


— 17 


20.3 


65 


—23 



Pre- 
cipita- 
tion. 



0.78 
1-43 
0.86 
0.13 
0.60 
0.36 
0-37 
0-79 
0.67 
0.24 
0.07 



0.63 



Climatological data— supplemental table. 



Sections and 
stations. 



0> 0J 

- — 
eg t- 



v ,p 



26.6 



27-5 



29.8 



32. 6 h 

3'-4 

32.6 



29.4 
34-6 



28.68 
32.1 

33-2 
33-4 



NORTHEASTERN. 

Bellevue 

Ewing 

Lyons 

Monroe 

Schuyler 

Sioux City, Iowa 

Wisner 

Yankton, S. Dak 

Southeastern. 

Benedict 

Bradshaw 

Burchard 

Chester 

Clatonia 

Eden 

Fairfield 

Fairmont 

Hickman 

McCool Junct.. . 

Marquette 

Nemaha 

Odell 

Osceola 

Palmyra 

Plattsmouth — 
Pleasanthill — 

Salem 

Strang j 32.1 

Syracuse 

Tablerock 31.0 

University Farraj 31.6 

Valparaiso i 

Wilber I 30.1 

Central. 

Burwell I 

Elba ! 

Greeley 

Mason City 

Palmer 

St.Libory 

Southwestern. 

Bartley 

Culbertson 

Hayes Center... 

Ough 

Sargent 

Smithfield 

Stratton 

Wallace 

Wauneta 

Wellfleet 

Western. 

Paxton 

Thedford 

Willard 

Northwestern. 

Cody 

Gordon 

Johnstown 

Merriman 

Spragg 



Precipitation, in 
inches. 



tr.-a 



0.29 
0.00 
0.14 
0.03 
T. 
0.24 
0.21 
0.06 

0-35 
0.25 

0.00 
T. 

0.00 

0.25 
T. 

0.15 



32-4 
3i-4 



0.05 

T. 

0.26 

0.47 

O. TO 
O. IO 
0.82 

T. 
0.20 
0.00 

0.35 
0.23 
0.12 



0.12 

T. 

0.02 
0.02 

T. 

T. 
0.04 

0.05 
0.02 
0.02 
0.00 



0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 



s 

£5 d 



-O.64 
-O.4I 
-O.29 



-0-37 
-0.35 
-0.36 
-0.47 



—0.50 
— 0.21 



—o.37 
—0.86 
—0.49 



— 0.20 
—0.63 
—0.37 
+0.01 
—0.32 
— o. 17 
—0.05 



— 0.42 
—0.34 

—0.65 
— o. 16 



-0.16 

-0.50 

-0.23 

-0.21 



-O.74 

-o-33 



-0.41 
-"■55 
-0.31 



-0.33 
-0.63 



T. 



0.00 
0.05 
0.00 
T. 
0.00 



-0.36 



Number of 
days— 



nw. 



nw. 
nw. 

SW. 

nw. 



nw. 
nw. 



nw. 
ne. 
nw. 



Observers. 



nw. 
sw. 
nw. 



n. 
sw. 



nw. 
nw. 



E.F.Stouffer. 
G.H.Benson. 
N.R. Kellam. 
Wm. Webster. 
L.N. Dickinson. 
Weather Bureau. 
Geo. W.Howe. 
Weather Bureau. 

R.B. Brabham. 

E.C.Hoggy. 

J.A.Kinsey. 

W.J.Kissick. 

F.W.Jones. 

D.J.Wood. 

M.L.Jones. 

G.H.Borden. 

O.O.Franklin. 

F.E.Porter. 

John Ellis. 

R.J. Duff. 

I. B. Huffman. 

G. W.Murbarger. 

W.D.Bancroft. 

W.L.Pickett. 

J. W. Ingles. 

J.E.Hart. 

S.Diller. 

D.W. VanHorne. 

S.H.Dopp. 

S.W.Perin. 

W.J.Craven. 

S. E.Davis. 

W.S.Green. 
S.M.Wellraan. 
J. A.PInkerton. 
John Amsberry. 
E. II. Smith. 
W.I.Meader. 

R.S.Baker. 

Mrs.L.A. W'ibley. 

R.C.Orr. 

Wm.Ough. 

J.S.Spooner. 

Ueo.C. Junkin. 

C.W.Shurtliff. 

H.S.Toogood. 

J.W.Haun. 

Wm. G.Hawkins. 

Frank N. Pearl. 
B. A.Darrow. 
Wesley W.Lewis. 

S.A.Ballenger. 
Amos Burwell. 
G.M.Heiney. 
F. Hussong. 
S.W. Spragg. 



MS 



January, 1900. 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



Climatological data for Nebraska, January, 1900. 



Stations. 



NORTHEASTERN SEC. 

Agee * 

Blair 

Columbus 

Creighton 

Fremont 

Hartington 

Hooper * 

Lynch 

Madison 

Norfolk 

Oakdale 

Omaha 

O'Neill 

Santee 

Stanton* 

Tekamah 

Wakefield 

Westpoint 

SOUTHEASTEUN SEC. 

Arborville* 

Ashland 

Auburn 

Aurora * 

Beatrice 

Crete 

David City 

Dawson 

Edgar* 

Fairbury 

Geneva 

Harvard 

Hebron 

Lincoln 

Nebraska City* 

Rulo* 

Seward * 

Superior* 

Tecumseh 

Turlington 

Weepingwater * 

Wyinore* 

York* 

Central Sec. 

Albion 

Ansley 

Ashton* 

Brokenbow* 

Callaway 

Central City* 

Dunning* 

Ericson * 

Genoa 

Gothenburg 

Grand Island 

Kearney* 

Lexington 

Loup* 

North Loup 

Ord * 

Ravenna 

St. Paul 

Southwestern Sec. 

Alma 

Arapahoe * 

Beaver City 

Benkelman* 

Bluehill* 

Curtis 

Franklin 

Haigler * 

Hastings* 

Holdrege * 

Imperial 

McCook * 

Madrid* 

Minden 

Redcloud * 

Republican* 

Wilson ville* 

Western Sec. 

Camp Clarke 

Gering 

Kimball 

Lodgepole 

Nesbit 

North Platte 

Seneca* 

Whitman* 

Northwestern Sec 

Alliance * 

Fort Robinson 

Hay Springs 

Kennedy 

Kirkwood * 

Springview 

Valentine 



Counties. 



Holt 

Washington. 

Platte 

Knox 

Dodge 

Cedar 

Dodge 

Boyd 

Madison 

...do 

Antelope 

Douglas 

Holt 

Knox 

Stanton 

Burt 

Dixon 

Cuming 



York 

Saunders 

Nemaha 

Hamilton ... 

Gage 

Saline 

Butler 

Richardson . 

Clay 

Jefferson. ... 
Fillmore — 

Clay 

Thayer 

Lancaster . 

Otoe 

Richardson . 

Seward 

Nuckolls 

Johnson 

Otoe 

Cass 

Gage 

York 



Boone 

Custer 

Sherman 

Custer 

...do 

Merrick 

Blaine 

Wheeler 

Platte 

Dawson 

Hall 

Buffalo 

Dawson 

Sherman — 

Valley 

...do 

Buffalo 

Howard 



Harlan 

Furnas 

...do 

Dundy 

Webster 

Frontier 

Franklin 

Dundy 

Adams 

Phelps 

Chase 

Red Willow. 

Perkins 

Kearney .... 
Webster .... 

Harlan 

Furnas 

Cheyenne . . . 
Scotts Bluff. 

Kimball 

Cheyenne . . . 

Logan 

Lincolu 

Thomas 

Grant 



Box Butte . 

Dawes 

Sheridan ... 

Cherry 

Rock 

Keya Paha . 
Cherry 



Temperature, in degrees Fahrenheit. 



1,442 
1,600 
1,203 
1,309 



1.585 
1.532 
1,722 
1.103 
1.975 



1,472 
1,060 
1,387 
i.3'3 



1, 100 
1,051 
1,792 
1,235 
1,368 
1,619 

945 
1,722 
1,316 
1,633 
1,812 
1,458 
1,189 
941 
842 
1,435 
1,574 
1,113 
1,214 
1,080 
1,222 
1,642 

1,747 
2,307 
2,061 

2,477 
2,555 
1,708 
2,621 
2,029 
1,584 
2,557 
1,860 
2,146 
2,385 
2,067 
1,961 



2,841 
2,971 
3,588 

3,968 
3,764 
3,821 



2,028 
1,796 

1,939 
2,173 

2,147 
2,968 
1,967 

2,553 
1,820 
3,256 
1,932 
2,324 
3,278 
2,506 
3,294 
2, 169 
1,687 
1,939 
2,298 

3,800 



4,697 
3,820 



2,613 



17 
9 
3 
8 
5 
14 
13 
30 



29.8 
28.2 
29.8 



28.3 
25-9 
27.4 
28.6 
29.8 
27.2 
27.7 
29.6 
27.0 
28.0 
25-4 
28.6 
26.2 
27.7 

27.4 
30.0 
31.6 
31-1 
3i-o 
24.8 
29.0 
32.6 
35-4 
31.0 
29.4 
3°-5 
3i-4 
30.7 
31-9 
31-4 
32.2 
30.8 
3°-4 
3°-4 
25- 5 
25.6 
29-5 

28.4* 
29.6 
30.6 
30.0 
27.1 
27.6 



29.4 
30.2 
3'.6 
28.8 
31.0 
31.2 
29-5 
28.1 
30.2 
30.6 

32. 2» 

35-3 
33-0 
33-1 
30.0 



32. 6' 
34-6 
29.4 
30.8 
32.4 
33-7 
30.6 
31-2 



31.4 
29.9 

27.8 
31.0 
33-1 

3 l '-9 
27.5 
31-4 
3"- 3 
33- S 

3°-4 
33-3 
30.2 
3°-4 
25-7 



30.8 



a 

~o 
*3 o 



-9.6 
+ S.'o' 



+ 9-8 
+ 8.4 



+ 11. o 
+ 5..I 
+ 9-5 
+ 9-5 
+ 10.4 
+ 6.6 
+ 11.3 
+ 5-5 
+ 6.8 



+ 8.2 
+ 3.0 
+ 4-6 
+ 6.5 
+ 8.3 
+ 10. 1 
+ 12.8 

+ 1-9 
+ 6.2 
+ 6.3 
+ 7-4 
+ 7-2 
+ 6.9 



+ 3-6 

+ 4-8 
+ 6.6 
+ 6.3 
+ 4-o 
+ 2.7 
+ 4-1 



+ 11. 1 
+ 5-3 
+ 7-1 
+ 3-4 
+ 5-5 
+ 5-5 
+ 8.2 
+ 2.2 
+ 6.3 
+ 2.1 



+ 4-° 
+ 4.6 
+ 3-2 



+ 7-9 



+ 4-7 
+ 5-6 
+ 5-6 
+ 3-1 
+ 4-3 
+ 10.0 



+ 4-4 
+ 2.1 



5-6 
6.4 
6.0 
3-5 
9-9 
4.8 

[O.I 



+ 8.2 
+ 10.6 
+ 11.2 

+ 7-5 
+ 2.8 



+ 12.0 



65 19 



I3+! 
23 

14 



2ot, 

13 

14 

13 

22 I 
22ti 
I3t 
19 
22 I 

13 i 

13 I 



13 

24 

13 

13 

19 

■3+ 

22 \ 

13 

13 

13 
I 9 t 
19 

iS 

13 
13 
19 

'9 

I2t 

19 
19 
19 
19 



— 4 

— 4 

— 2 

— 6 

— 6 

— 5 

— 5 

— 4 

— 5 

— 5 

— 7 

— 8 

— 9 



3i 
31 
31 
3i 
3i 
3i 
3i 
28 
30 
31 
3' ! 

28t 

-•St 
28 1 



31 

28t 45 



46 



28 
28 
28 
28 
23 
28 
28 
28 
2 

28t| 

28 



46 



39 






28 


47 


8 


28 


5° 


7 


27 


43 





28 


bi 


9 


28 


36 


5 


28 


39 





28 





28 

28t; 43 
43 
48 



29 

a8t 



28 46 



Precipitation, in inches. 



ti u 

s o 



0.04 

0.31 

o. 01 



0.24 
0.40 
o. 10 

T. 

0.14 
0.14 

0.13 

°T 15 
T. 
0.24 
0.22 
0.30 
T. 

0.05 
o. 10 
0.25 
0.03 
0.50 
0.20 
0.15 
o. 10 
o. 10 

T. 
0.17 
0.16 
0.05 
0.13 
0.15 
0.15 
0.40 

T. 
0.2s 
0.28 
0.26 

T. 
0.20 

0-15 

T. 

0.02 

0.0s 

T. 

T. 



T. 
0.04 

T. 
0.00 

T. 

T. 

T. 
0.02 
0.03 
o.oi 
0.04 

o. 01 

T. 

T. 

T. 

T. 
0.00 
0.00 

T. 

T. 

T. 
0.07 
0.20 
0.02 
0.05 

T. 
0.00 

T. 

T. 
T. 
T. 
T. 
T. 
0.06 
T. 



9 ; 0.O6 

7 I T. 
7 0.17 
5 1 0-29 
o o. 15 
5 i T. 



13 0-04 



a 


0) 


o_; 




£ * 


s 


liti 


•*■ tn 






a 


■£ s 


£ 


s ° 


Sis 





—0.41 

—0.15 

—0.27 



— 0.72 

—0.45 



—0.29 
— 0.19 

—0.15 

— 0.40 
—0.54 
—0.43 
—0.58 
—0.03 

— 0.50 

— 0.20 
— 0. 64 

—O.36 
—O.52 

—O.47 
—O.23 
+ O.04 
—O.49 

—0.75 
— 0.6.| 
—0-33 
—0-7S 
— 0.26 
—O.36 
— 0.72 
-0-57 

—0.66 
—0.64 
— 0.21 

—0-53 
—0.77 
—0.31 
— 0.62 



0.04 
0.25 

0.01 



-0-34 

-0. 11 
-0.41 
-0.13 
-o. 11 
-0. 19 
-0.48 



-0.47 

-0.75 
-0.40 
-0.52 
-0.52 
-0.65 
-0.21 
-0.71 
-0.22 
-0.66 
-0.35 



—0.26 
—0.21 
— 0.24 
— 0.26 
— 0.24 
— 0.40 
— 0.17 
—0.38 
—o.43 
— 0-55 
— 0.09 
—0.39 
—0.89 
—0.32 
— o. 19 
— 0.22 



-0-59 
-0.60 
-0.48 
-0.42 

-0-39 
-0.28 
-o. 19 

-0.86 
-0.57 
-0.51 

-"•45 
-0.48 



-0.49 



0.22 

o-i5 
o. 10 

T. 
0.14 
0.12 
0.07 
o. 14 

T. 

T. 
0.17 
0.20 
0.20 

T. 

0.05 
o. 10 

0.21 

0.03 
0.50 
0.20 
0.15 
0.06 
o. 10 
T. 
0.17 
0.16 
0.05 

O.I3 
0.15 

°-i5 
0.40 

T. 
0.25 
0.21 
0.24 

T. 
0.20 



T. 

0.02 
0.03 

T. 

T. 



T. 
0.04 

T. 
0.00 

T. 

T. 

T. 
0.02 
0.03 
0.01 
0.04 

0.01 

T. 

T. 

T. 

T. 
0.00 
0.00 

T. 

T. 

T. 
0.07 
o. 10 
0.02 

O. OA 

T.' 

0.00 

T. 

T. 

T. 

T. 

T. 

T. 
0.06 

T. 
0.02 

T. 
o. 10 
0.24 
o. 10 

T. 



S t3 



a 
3§ 



T. 
T. 



T. 

1-5 

0.0 

T. 

T. 

T. 

I-" 3 



T. 



T. 
T. 



1.0 
0.0 
T. 
0.0 
T. 



* 



ja-o 

a 

3 



T. 
0.0 
0.0 

"t." 

T. 
T. 



T. 
T. 

% 5 
T. 

T. 



T. 
0.0 

T. 
0.0 

T. 

T. 

T. 
0.2 



0.1 
0.0 

0.1 
T. 
T. 



T. 
0.0 
0.0 

T. 

T. 

T. 

0-5 
2.0 
0.2 
0.2 

T. 
0.0 

T. 

T. 
T. 
T. 



T. 
T. 
T. 
0.6 

T. 
o-7 

2-5 

i-5 



Sky. 



a 



II 

1° 



3 
O 
O » 

a 

3 
8 



9* 



nw. 

nw. 
nw. 



nw. 

nw. 

sw. 

s. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

sw. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

s. 

nw. 

n. 

nw. 

nw. 

s. 

w. 

s. 

nw. 

nw. 

n. 

nw. 

nw. 



9 
13 



nw. 

n. 

nw. 

nw. 

n. 

nw. 



nw. 
nw. 
nw. 
nw. 



nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

s. 

w. 

nw. 

nw. 

s. 

n. 

nw. 

sw. 



nw. 

sw. 

ne. 

nw. 

11. 

n. 

w. 

nw. 



nw. 
nw. 
nw. 



nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

nw. 

w. 

nw. 

w. 



nw. 
sw. 
nw. 
nw. 
nw. 



I w. 



Observers. 



R.E.Bowden. 

E. A. Palmer. 
C.C.Gray. 

Dr. Geo. Roberts. 

Wm. J. Phillips. 

T. B.A.Watson. 

T.W.Lyman. 

C.C.Irwin. 

Dr. F.A.Long. 

Dr. P. H.Salter. 

G.S.Clingman. 

IT. S. Weather Bureau. 

Chas. N. Cole. 

W.H.Hamlin. 

W.Gerecke. 

Dr. A. D. Nesbit. 

I. H. Weaver. 

C.J.Kadish. 

E.D.Smith. 

Dr.A.S. vMansfelde. 

G.D.Carriugton. 

H.C.Miller. 

A. C. Zimmerman. 

Doane College. 

E.B.Taylor. 

Mrs. Ira Draper. 

L. L. Fuller. 

W.F.Cramb. 

F.M.Flory. 

Dr. J. T.Fleming. 

Dr.C. M.Easton. 

IT. S. Weather Bureau. 

R.R.Douglas. 

W.F.Gingrich. 

L.E.Ost. 

L.W.Hahn. 

C.M.Miller. 

Wm.N. Hunter. 

G. Treat. 

H.B.Ware. 

O.P.Lowry. 

F.A.Pettinger. 
Chas. K. Hare. 

F. Rein. 
H.L.Ormsby. 
Geo.B.Mair. 
J.A.McRae. 
L.L.Williams. 
R.W.Haller. 
Geo. S. Truman. 
A.V.Carlson. 
E.Corbiu. 
C.E.Magner. 
IraP.Griswold. 
E.S.Hayhurst. 
J.E.Goodrich. 
Jas. Milford. 
Erastus Smith. 
Paul Anderson. 

R.E. Pitcher. 
J F.Edwards. 
C.G.George. 
W.F. Winger. 
C.S. Draper. 
Dr. S. R. Razee. 
F.T.Owen. 
T.P.F.Haine. 
J.C.Swarts. 

C. Engstrom. 
Robert Malcolm. 
C.T.Watson. 
John McKenzie. 
Joel Hull. 
A.Conover. 
W.Bardon. 

D. F. Hostetter. 

Robt.H. Willis. 
J.P.Finley. 
F.J. Bellows. 
A.B.Persinger. 
Grant E.Bolkcom. 
U. S. Weather Bureau. 
F.D.Gallup. 
M.J.Johnson. 

J.Kridelbaugh. 

Post surgeon. 

C. A. Waterman. 

D.A.Piercy. 

Mrs.C.Arter. 

Ezada Phelps. 

U.S. Weather Bureau. 



* Temperature data from thermometers not self registering. + Occurred on more than one day. », \ •, etc., indicate number of days missing from observed readings. 
All records are used in determining State or district means, but State and district departures are determined by comparison of current data of oniy stations with normals. 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



January, 1900. 






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cm \p O i 
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cm cm co co co co co 



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CO ♦ CO co co co co 



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co CO CO CO CO co co 



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co CO co cO cO co co 



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co ^■♦cOcOcOcOCO 



co PJ >- P* CM vo On 
CO co co co co co co 



co co cO fO co cO ♦ 



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r-.\D >O00 O NO 
CM CM CM CM COCO* 



cm iDO oo o r-. o 

CM CM CM CM CO CO ♦ 



* « cn m qS oj cd 

cp oy Zi^zxix: 
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2*Jj!Jic3ca 
c c o a — -^"- 



mrna 






o 
o 

C5 






55 

o 

t—i 
e- 
<< 

i— i 

I— i 

o 

w 

ft. 

— 
C 




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<x> 

a 



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a 

35 
50 

a> 

O 

a 



a 



a 
too 



o 



CLIMATE AND CROPS: NEBRASKA SECTION. 



January, 1900. 



Daily precipitation for Nebraska, January, 1900. 



Stations. 


Day of month. 




i. 


2. 


3- 


4- 


5- 


6. 


7- 


8. 


9- 


10. 


11. 


12. 


13- 


H- 


15- 


16. 


17- 


18. 


'9- 


20. 


21. 


22. 


23- 


24. 


25- 


26. 


27- 


28. 


29. 


30. 


3'- 


3 





t 














t 
•15 




t 










.04 




























t 
























































0.04 




















t 


t 






























t 






t 




t 


°- '5 

t 
0.01 

t 

0.05 
0. 10 
0.25 
0.03 
0.05 
0.5b 

t 
0.31 

t 

0.05 
0.00 

t 

+ 

t 

t 
0. 01 




.01 

t 


























































t 


















t 






















t 
























•05 












































t 










t 






.10 












+ 
.04 














































.21 


























































•°3 














































.05 




































































+ 






T 




































































































t 


































t 






























t 
t 
.03 


t 








t 






•25 




.02 










.02 


.02 






















































































t 
















.02 










































































































t 
t 


















t 
































t 






















































+ 


"t 


















t 








t 


t 
























t 








t 




































































.01 












t 
































































































t 
.02 














t 


.20 














































0.20 
0.02 
0.00 
0.15 
0. 10 
10 

t 

t 

0.17 
0.00 
0.24 
0.17 
0.04 

t 


























































t 










































































t 
.01 




t 


•'5 
.06 

.10 


















































t 
t 




















t 


• °3 






























t 










































































t 
















































t 
































































. 10 
































.02 


• 05 






































































t 














.22 

•17 
.04 




.02 

t 














t 








































t 




























































































































t 


























t 

t 






t 

t 
























































t 


























































t 








t 
























.02 



















































































+ 








t 
0.40 




• 05 

t 


.10 














•'5 












.10 




















t 
























.16 












































t 
























































t 














t 














































.02 






















t 








t 
















t 








• os 


t 




.24 


t 


0.29 
0.05 

t 




t 
t 












•°5 
































































































t 




















•°7 






















t 






t 


t 


0.07 

t 




t 






























































































•05 








.10 

+ 


t 
t 


0..5 


Kimball .. 
































t 


















t 
























t 
































t 




t 
t 












t 
t 














t 

t 




























t 




t 




t 








t 


t 


•13 




t 










t 


+ 
























0.13 

t 
















t 


























t 




t 
t 

T 
t 














t 
t 

.14 
+ 
















t 




























t 




























































t 
















.14 




t 








t 
+ 


















t 
















0.14 
0.14 




















































Madrid . 
























.02 






















































































t 


t 


t 
t 


t 


t 




.01 














.04 






































t 


0.05 






































































.26 
























































t 




















t 

.12 
.02 

t 
.07 
























t 


t 




+ 

t 


t 


t 




t 


t 












+ 


t 


.02 








t 


t 


+ 


















0. 14 














t 


























North Platte 


t 
t 
t 
t 


























.06 






















t 






t 


+ 


0.06 
















.03 


• 47 
.14 


t 










•°3 




















0.13 

0.47 
o.i 5 


Odell .. 


t 
























































t 


t 


+ 


t 

t 


t 










t 


.01 






















t 








O'Neill . 


























































.10 




























































































































t 






















.:..i.... 






















t 




•"■|::;: 


























.01 




















t 














t 
t 


















































t 






t 


Rulo ... 






























•15 
























°-i5 


St Paul 














.04 














































t 
















t 










t 


































t 


















t 










































t 




t 














t 




































+ 






t 




t 
















.40 




































0.40 




























































0.00 




:::::::: 










































































•17 












.07 


































0.24 
















t 

■25 
.20 










































t 




























































0.25 


















.02 










































0.22 
















t 








































t 




.04 














.21 








•••••••■•••■ 


t 


.07 






























0.28 


















t 


























t 






t 




0.04 


































































.10 












.20 
































0.30 


















.24 
































+ 








0.26 




t 






















........ 


t 






























t 




















t 




























.02 


.02 


.02 








0.06 




























































t 














.16 
.20 












•05 




























t 






0.21 


York 




















































0.20 




1 


























1 





























t Trace (when precipitation is less than 0.01 of an inch). 



UNiVEBStTYOF^L^OlSURBANA 



3 0112104119224